Date   

Re: Transporting Sheep In Open Top Cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:
This may be the same kind of car, but it's not identical. The
caption reads "Load of sugar beets being dumped into a Southern
Pacific railroad car in Compton, 1910."
http://digarc.usc.edu/search/controller/asset/chs-m5675/CHS-12736

This is the car in my previous post:
http://www.sacramentohistory.org/admin/photo/935_1940.jpg
The same dumper is shown on page 164 of my Volume 1 on SP gondolas. These beet racks did have A-frame interiors.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Fruit Growers Express Reefers

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Bruce Smith wrote:
Several FGE reefers have been preserved, including ones at the B&O RR
museum, the Southeastern Railway Museum outside Atlanta, and the
Cincinnati museum (in Ky).
Don't forget the very nice one (with interior) at CSRM.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
Also one at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, MI.

Dennis


Re: Transporting Sheep In Open Top Cars

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

I ran across this image today and it made me think about my recent
post.

This is a link to a Southern Pacific photo in USC's digital archive
collection at: http://digarc.usc.edu/search/controller/index.htm .

This may be the same kind of car, but it's not identical. The
caption reads "Load of sugar beets being dumped into a Southern
Pacific railroad car in Compton, 1910."
http://digarc.usc.edu/search/controller/asset/chs-m5675/CHS-12736

This is the car in my previous post:
http://www.sacramentohistory.org/admin/photo/935_1940.jpg

Are they similar cars? The outside posts don't seem to be exactly
the same plus on the beet car they&#92; posts are pared because they are
actually door frames. The car hauling sheep does not have the top
mounted rods running the length of the car. But I don't know. Maybe
the sheep car is some kind of earlier beet car.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA


Long and narrow frieght cars

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Awhile back someone was wondering if there was a formula for determining the width of long freight cars. According to the Plate B (steam era) clearance standard, the maximum car width was 10 ft 8 in so long as the truck centers were 41-3 or less. For longer cars there was a graph of max width vs. truck center distance. Although the line is slightly curved, the formula is approximately (+/- 1 inch)

w = 162 - .8 * L

where w is the max width in inches and L is the center distance in feet.

KL


Re: Fruit Growers Express Reefers

Jeffrey White
 

Thanks for the help, wasn't jerking anyone's chain, I've been away from
the hobby for 30 years.
Jeff

benjaminfrank_hom wrote:


Jeff White wrote:
"I can't find any HO cars marked Fruit Growers Express so maybe my
memory is faulty and they were Western Fruit Express or Pacific Fruit
Express. Anyone know if Fruit Growers Express did in fact exist?"

Sir, surely you're jerking our collective chains. Of course it
existed! Go to the files section of the STMFC file storage group
STMFPH, go to the file titled FGEX, and download the file titled "Bill
Welch - 2002 Naperville Handout.pdf" .
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFPH
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFPH>

Ben Hom


Re: Fruit Growers Express Reefers

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Bruce Smith wrote:
Several FGE reefers have been preserved, including ones at the B&O RR museum, the Southeastern Railway Museum outside Atlanta, and the Cincinnati museum (in Ky).
Don't forget the very nice one (with interior) at CSRM.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Fruit Growers Express Reefers

Bruce Smith
 

Jeff White wrote:
"I can't find any HO cars marked Fruit Growers Express so maybe my
memory is faulty and they were Western Fruit Express or Pacific Fruit
Express. Anyone know if Fruit Growers Express did in fact exist?"
Ben Hom replied:
Sir, surely you're jerking our collective chains. Of course it
existed! Go to the files section of the STMFC file storage group
STMFPH, go to the file titled FGEX, and download the file titled "Bill
Welch - 2002 Naperville Handout.pdf" .
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFPH
In addition, the archives are swimming with FGE information and a simple
Google search brings you photos of not only the prototype, but a few
correct (and lots of incorrect) models. Several FGE reefers have been
preserved, including ones at the B&O RR museum, the Southeastern Railway
Museum outside Atlanta, and the Cincinnati museum (in Ky). See
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/gallery/reefer/reefermain.html for
prototype photos

Prototypical cars in HO are made by Sunshine (resin, several varieties)
and Intermountain. The Accurail wood reefer can be "bashed" to make
several FGE reefers as well. For model photos, see the steam era freight
car site:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/modeling/models/reefers/modelsreefersmain.html

Regards
Bruce
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: TOFC

James Fellows
 

I read a bit about MEC TOFC operations. They began in 1958 with two trailers hauling groceries for IGA between Portland and Bangor. In 1964 the MEC handled 770 trailers. So for a 1960 you need very few trailers and flats.

Jim Fellows

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim O'Connor
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, December 18, 2007 10:21 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: TOFC


This particular x-post Z-van design was made from 1968
through 1976. The old Athearn Fruehauf trailer is based
on a reefer trailer built for PFE in the early 1960's.
In any case the trailer paint schemes (like this one)
are anachronistic as applied to these RTR flats w/ trailers.

http://www.athearn.com/Products/Default.aspx?ProdID=ATH72461

This is the Mopac scheme I like, which dates from the late
1950's and was applied to earlier x-post trailers.
http://www.athearn.com/Products/Default.aspx?ProdID=ATH72457

Tim O'Connor

>Tim O'Connor wrote:
>
>"That's right, but the trailer they used is a late 1960's Fruehauf (a really
>nice model actually) and the trailer paint schemes are from the early 60's
>or later. I almost bought the MP model but the trailer was simply not an
>accurate representation of that prototype so I passed."
>
>Tim;
>I believe the Athearn is to represent the Fruehauf "Z-van" which appeared mid-'60's, but you're right on target anyway - a great trailer model in the incorrect (earlier) paint or lettering scheme...
>
>Regards.
>Peter


Re: Fruit Growers Express Reefers

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Jeff White wrote:
"I can't find any HO cars marked Fruit Growers Express so maybe my
memory is faulty and they were Western Fruit Express or Pacific Fruit
Express. Anyone know if Fruit Growers Express did in fact exist?"

Sir, surely you're jerking our collective chains. Of course it
existed! Go to the files section of the STMFC file storage group
STMFPH, go to the file titled FGEX, and download the file titled "Bill
Welch - 2002 Naperville Handout.pdf" .
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFPH


Ben Hom


Fruit Growers Express Reefers

Jeffrey White
 

I seem to remember long sections of yellow/orange reefer cars going
through my hometown on the IC when I was a kid. IIRC they belonged to
Fruit Growers Express.

I can't find any HO cars marked Fruit Growers Express so maybe my memory
is faulty and they were Western Fruit Express or Pacific Fruit Express.
Anyone know if Fruit Growers Express did in fact exist?

Thanks
Jeff


Re: Western hoppers in the eastern US - Diatomite

Mr Charles burns
 

Hello all
Read your post on diatomaceous earth. I'm modelling
the ESPEE coastline between Santa Barbara, and
Guadalupe, including the Lompoc branch circa 1964.
I chatted with someone who worked the branch in the
sixties, and he told me that it was shipped mostly in
boxcars.I noted that the title of this chat was about
western hoppers. ESPEE ,like the other western
roads,had large fleets of GS gons That did the work
that hoppers did in the east.I'm sure some of ESPEE's
hoppers did stray east. I never saw many hoppers out
on the coast.
Charlie Burns
--- John Hile <john66h@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor
<timboconnor@...> wrote:

SP served the world's largest deposit of
diatomaceous earth in
California, and that stuff was shipped all over
the world. It
has many uses -- including its key use in
DYNA-mite.

Tim O'Connor
Here is some diatomite (diatomaceous earth) info
from the late 1940's:

Although Oregon, Nevada, and Washington were
producing small amounts,
California was the largest producing state, with the
largest quarry
located near Lompoc. Both the Johns-Manville
Products Corp and the
Dicalite Division of the Great Lakes Carbon Corp
appear to have worked
this deposit, with Great Lakes Carbon also working
the second largest
deposit in the state near Walteria.

Uses were grouped as follows: (1) filters, more than
1/2; (2) fillers,
1/3; (3) insulation, 1/8; (4) lightweight aggregate
and abrasive.
Filters for all types of liquids are made in several
varieties for
various specific purposes. Powdered diatomite is
used in fillers
where a chemically inert lightweight mineral is
needed. Insulation
materials include saw brick and manufactured pressed
brick. Natural
and calcined aggregate are also made and sacked.
Metal polishing
abrasives and dental powders are minor uses for
"insignificant" amounts.

Processing of the diatomite was done at the quarry.
Natural brick was
sawed and kiln dried; pressed brick was manufactured
and fired;
aggregates were made and sacked. Sounds like mostly
boxcars to me for
the brick and sacked products, although no further
mention is made of
the filtration market.

Great Lakes Carbon trucked the material from Lompoc
to Walteria where
it was processed with material from the mine located
there.

John Hile



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Re: TOFC TRAILER(S)

Tim O'Connor
 

built 1968 to 1976... if we're talking about the x-post Z van model.

-------------- Original message ----------------------
From: "Frank Greene" <frgreene290@...>
On page 26 Jan 2008 RMC is a Athearn ad for a 40ft Fruehauf Z Vans..Whats
the era
for these trailers..
Joel Norman
Late 1970s.

Frank Greene
Memphis, TN


Re: TOFC TRAILER(S)

Frank Greene
 

On page 26 Jan 2008 RMC is a Athearn ad for a 40ft Fruehauf Z Vans..Whats the era
for these trailers..
Joel Norman
Late 1970s.

Frank Greene
Memphis, TN


Re: Transporting Sheep In Open Top Cars

Bill Kelly
 

Possibly these racks are a predecessor of the Blackburn sugar
beet rack as shown on page 171 of _SP Freight Cars vol 3_.
Interesting that the car in the book is coupled to a stock car.

Later,
Bill Kelly

Tony wrote:
Yes, and I still agree that these superstructures do seem to
have side doors. But even the earliest SP beet racks, called
"Blackburn" racks for their designer, had an A-frame interior, and
said interior looks like it's part of the structure of the rack, thus
not
readily removable. It's possible, of course, that these are modified
beet racks for the exact purpose of stock movement, though SP
throughout the first half of the 20th century had one of the larger
stock car fleets in the country and is thus a little unlikely as a
candidate to create "emergency" rolling stock like this.


Re: Transporting Sheep In Open Top Cars

al_brown03
 

Anyone recognize the location?

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Doug Harding wrote:
Bob I came across this photo a few years ago. At that time it
was
labled as being "gons", which was quite puzzling, ie how did they
get
the sheep in or out of the cars. Tony and I discussed this and
concluded the cars were indeed beet racks, can't recall the
manufacture without consulting old notes. The beet racks have
doors in
the sides.
Yes, and I still agree that these superstructures do seem
to
have side doors. But even the earliest SP beet racks, called
"Blackburn" racks for their designer, had an A-frame interior, and
said
interior looks like it's part of the structure of the rack, thus
not
readily removable. It's possible, of course, that these are
modified
beet racks for the exact purpose of stock movement, though SP
throughout the first half of the 20th century had one of the larger
stock car fleets in the country and is thus a little unlikely as a
candidate to create "emergency" rolling stock like this.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Accurail gon

Curt Fortenberry <arrphoto@...>
 

Alaska RR cars had a different style end though. But from the side a
good stand in.

Curt Fortenberry


Beginning in
1944, a few railroads ordered new cars of this design, notably the
GM&O
and P&WV, and the D&RGW received a bunch by federal mandate which
they
didn't want and which they sold as soon as the war ended to the
Alaska
RR.


Re: CCBX 501

olin4812
 

Back in Feb of '07 Jim B wrote:
Thanks for the info Richard. I didn't really expect the Model
Power
car to be a great model of a specific car. That same green and
white
car has also been produced by Varney and Mantua/Tyco. I was more
interested in the green and white paint, if there are any photos of
the green and white Union Carbide cars, what they carried, when and
what Carbide plants they served.
Thanks agian.
Jim B.
Jim,
There is a picture of GATX 76184 in a green with white lettering
"UNION CARBIDE CHEMICALS COMPANY" scheme on page 102 of Bill Marvel's
Santa Fe Vol1 at Richmond California in 1965. The car has heavy
commodity stains, so it may have been in that scheme since the
permissable discussion period. It looks like a 10,000 gallon ICC
103W or similar to me. If any of our GATX & decal experts know of a
good way to model this car, I'd love to do one too. Once again a
need for a nice dome platform add on part!

Olin Dirks,
Omaha, NE


Re: Transporting Sheep In Open Top Cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Doug Harding wrote:
Bob I came across this photo a few years ago. At that time it was labled as being "gons", which was quite puzzling, ie how did they get the sheep in or out of the cars. Tony and I discussed this and concluded the cars were indeed beet racks, can't recall the manufacture without consulting old notes. The beet racks have doors in the sides.
Yes, and I still agree that these superstructures do seem to have side doors. But even the earliest SP beet racks, called "Blackburn" racks for their designer, had an A-frame interior, and said interior looks like it's part of the structure of the rack, thus not readily removable. It's possible, of course, that these are modified beet racks for the exact purpose of stock movement, though SP throughout the first half of the 20th century had one of the larger stock car fleets in the country and is thus a little unlikely as a candidate to create "emergency" rolling stock like this.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Transporting Sheep In Open Top Cars

Douglas Harding <dharding@...>
 

Bob I came across this photo a few years ago. At that time it was labled as
being "gons", which was quite puzzling, ie how did they get the sheep in or
out of the cars. Tony and I discussed this and concluded the cars were
indeed beet racks, can't recall the manufacture without consulting old
notes. The beet racks have doors in the sides. You might want to search the
group files for our discussion. The photo has intrigued anyone who has seen
it.

Doug Harding
www.iowacentralrr.org

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Re: HO scale Accurail prototypes

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Steve Sandifer asked:
"What other railroads would be accurate for this?

#3700 41' AAR Steel Gondola
http://www.accurail.com/accurail/3700.htm
1941 AAR design first built for ACL."

We covered this in August. See post #65367.


Ben Hom

126321 - 126340 of 194818