Date   

Re: Cocoa Beach hands on clinic update and reflections on earlier projects

jerryglow2
 

If you have the CDs in time for Cocoa Beach that will do fine for me.

As for the decals for the KCS car, I lost mine and really wanted the
car badly so did the artwork and sent it in to Tom Stolte for an
upcoming Oddballs set. If you could make the directions available
online (or write it up as an article and point out availability of
the decals) that should shut up the sniveling (fill in your favorite
term).

Jerry Glow


--- In STMFC@..., tgregmrtn@... wrote:

I read some folks feel left out at the Hands on Clinic in Cocoa
Beach.

To date the Kahn's Car clinic was reproduced in The B&O Modeler and
I owe
about 5 folks a copy of a CD to help with additional information
but my own
computer is in the shop after a power failure last weekend. I will
be getting
them out ASAP.

Don't feel left out. All of the projects have been or will be
reproduced in
some other media at some point.

All these projects are donations graciously given and accepted by
the folks
in attendance and are made to be reproducible on your own at your
expense.
The DECALS CAN BE A PROBLEM for the KCS car. However; these
projects are meant
to be an incentive to the Cocoa Beach event or other selective
events for
those who commit to coming. They have been FREE and in the future
will remain
that way as far as I can tell. This years is a donation from
BRANCHLINE for the
car and some additional parts from KADEE® and ACCURAIL®.

As for this coming event the space is now limited and is filling
quickly, so
if you are available to come to the event and would like to be
included for
this years project please let Mike Brock know... OFFLINE... and
please CC me
in the note. I have included those who have spoken up. So, if you
thought you
were included and don't see your name let us know upon reading
this
update...


1.) Denny Anspach
2.) Mont Switzer
3.) John Greedy
4.) Jim Singer
5.) Armand Premo
6.) Clark Propst
7.) Ken Edmier
8.) Roger Hinman
9.) Murrie Helton
10.) Richard Berry
11.) Bob Putt
12.) Rob Gross
13.) Mike Moore
14.) Jerry Glow
15.) Bill Welch
16.) John Wheeler
17.) Mark Kerrlick
18.) Mike Brock

Thanks,

Greg Martin




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Re: Carmer uncoupling levers

MDelvec952
 

In a message dated 12/9/2007 5:40:32 PM Eastern Standard Time,
lndkline@... writes:

And Richard Hendrickson replied:
But it's an interesting question, and the answer seems to be that all
of the USRA freight cars had Carmer uncoupling levers when delivered,
and that they all appear to be the same in size and configuration.
Note, however, that some owners apparently didn't like the Carmer
levers and replaced them in later years with other types of
uncoupling mechanisms (usually of the rotary type).


============

I found the Carmer cut lever discussion quite interesting.

To add to the mix, I've had the chance to use the Carmers in service.
Conrail's fleet of scale test cars included three that were built ca. 1900 -- one
was 1898 and the other were 1905, 1908, etc., and all had Carmer cut levers
that all evidence suggested were original. I remember seeing the 1898 one
stored at the ACF car cleaning facility in Milton, Pa., during a tour there ca.
1995 or so., suggesting it was retired.

Scale test cars annually visit the refinery that is my employer, and as
these moldy oldies would visit we'd move them to the various places they needed
to be, and send them out. Always a special move, they're required to be 2nd
from the hind end in any train, since they had no working air brakes (to keep
the weight constant). Right now NS 80017 is visiting Bayonne and will hit our
refinery next. I'm sure it's a newer one.

One day ca. 2003 or so when one needed to leave and I had some time I
comondeered an engineer and an engine to move one out to Conrail. Since I had to
bury it with another car so Conrail could just couple and pull, I got to play
with it a bit specifically to put the Carmer cut levers through the paces of
typical switching. I saw it as a rare chance to operate a steam-era freight
car. That inlcuded various hitches and kicking cars away from it, and
kicking it into other cars, and operating the cut-lever with the foot while on the
car. All were standard operations in steam days.

The contrast between the Carmers and the steel rods was stark. First, the
Carmers are two-pieces of flat steel or iron connected at the end by a bolt
that is the fulcrum of the uncoupling action, and 90-degree tabs on each
portion transfer its motion to the other portion resulting in a lot of slack in
operating them. The section connected to the coupler is heavier than the section
operated by the trainman. Second, the Carmers require pushing down on the
lever to lift the pin on the coupler. As the Carmers wear, the trainman has
to push further down to lift the pin. When kicking cars, the motion of
walking alongside a Carmer car and pushing down on the lever feels like some men
could have easily been thrown off balance and fallen. And I could see the
possibility of things falling off a car actually hitting the cut lever causing an
unwanted uncoupling, or the Carmer catching something trackside like trees
or brush or debris and the weight of that in concert with the normal rocking
and rolling between cars in a train causing an uncoupling (who of us hasn't
hit or broken a Carmer cut lever on a model?). Riding the car and pushing
down on the coupler with the foot wasn't bad at all. Since the hand holds are
minimal on a scale test car, I wasn't moving when operating it with my foot.

The rotary types that replaced Carmers are usually of one piece of rod, and
it requires lifting the rod to lift the pin on the coupler. Two-piece
rod-type cut levers are often replacements that can telescope to accomodate almost
any configuration of end-sill / coupler relationship. Lifting the lever is
much more comfortable when walking alongside one railcar to kick or drop cars.
The rod falls safely vertical when not in use. And you develop the ability
to lift a lever with your foot to uncouple on the fly.

Conclusion: Carmer cut-levers rightfully belong in the history books as the
rotary-types are safer and easier to use, repair and replace. Museums with
Carmer-equipped cars should couple one to a rotary-type car and allow visitors
operate both. It's such a simple thing, but that simple motion is a staple
in the life of a railroader in any era. I covered a conductor's job
yesterday, worked five hours and made more than 70 hitches and cuts.

Mike Del Vecchio
(a trainmaster whose leg muscles still ache somewhat from all of the walking
in yards and getting on and off and clinging to the sides of tank cars.)



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Re: Air hoses and brackets...

jim peters
 

Denny or anyone else . . .

I share in the obsession, but my thought was to fabricate the bracket in etched brass. To date I have made one inquiry about the do-ability and cost . . . with a "I don't have the time" response.

My thinking was, the etched brass part would allow variance in mounting to the car and with a short piece of .006" brass wire partially wrapped around the air hose (brass of coarse) could be soldered to the other end of the bracket, giving the appearance of a U-Bolt attachment.

If anyone on the group is experienced in the brass etching process, I have all the dimensions worked out and would like to discuss the project further . . . on or off the list.

Jim Peters
Coquitlam, BC


To: STMFC@...: danspach@...: Fri, 7 Dec 2007 09:14:41 -0800Subject: [STMFC] Re:Air hoses and brackets...




A few weeks ago, we were discussing Denny's obsession with air hose>brackets.H-mm. Great interest, yes; but obsession.... :-) ?Well, it ain't over until its over. Courtesy of one of our own List members, I do have some very fine CAD drawings for a very doable good looking but secure HO air hose bracket, which I have presented to PSC for consideration for brass casting. The cost of making a master or pattern is beyond belief, but if a brass pattern can be fabricated (+8% to account for shrinkage), they will do it. If the same pattern is made from resin or wax, they can also do it, but only for very short runs.IMHO, resin or styrene brackets simply do not cut it because there is no way to make them sturdy enough to withstand the most casual handling over any period of time, especially with the relatively stiff brass air hoses (be careful what you wish for!).My intention has been to attempt making a brass pattern, but I am totally preoccupied with other pressing matters that will not let up until mid January :-( .All of this said, the appearance of our prototype freight cars, either individually or en train, is so dramatically improved by the routine inclusion of these details that it is worthy of the effort.Although I am not standing in a trench on this issue, I am much interested that this problem be solved right here in the USA, not China.Denny-- Denny S. Anspach, MDSacramento





_________________________________________________________________
Use fowl language with Chicktionary. Click here to start playing!
http://puzzles.sympatico.msn.ca/chicktionary/index.html?icid=htmlsig


Prototype Rails at Cocoa Beach

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

For those planning to attend Prototype Rails in Cocoa Beach.

The Space Shuttle launch has been moved to Jan 2. The dates for Prototype Rails are Jan 3-6. While the launch date may, of course, move until a later time period, hotel room availability for our weekend will drop to zero VERY shortly...as in today. We have a room block but we've already exceeded it and have added rooms. It may not be possible to add more. Our hotel...the Hilton at Cocoa Beach...is one of two hotels that the media, VIP's and NASA associated people use. If you have not made a reservation by now, DO SO IMMEDIATELY!!! All of the launch associated hotel reservations are now being moved to our time period.

Current launch windows are in the afternoon....3:21 was today's I believe. At the present, I do not know the Jan window but I'm guessing afternoon as well.

DO NOT DELAY ON THE ROOM RESERVATION.

Mike Brock
Prototype Rails Chairman


Cocoa Beach hands on clinic update and reflections on earlier projects

Greg Martin
 

I read some folks feel left out at the Hands on Clinic in Cocoa Beach.

To date the Kahn's Car clinic was reproduced in The B&O Modeler and I owe
about 5 folks a copy of a CD to help with additional information but my own
computer is in the shop after a power failure last weekend. I will be getting
them out ASAP.

Don't feel left out. All of the projects have been or will be reproduced in
some other media at some point.

All these projects are donations graciously given and accepted by the folks
in attendance and are made to be reproducible on your own at your expense.
The DECALS CAN BE A PROBLEM for the KCS car. However; these projects are meant
to be an incentive to the Cocoa Beach event or other selective events for
those who commit to coming. They have been FREE and in the future will remain
that way as far as I can tell. This years is a donation from BRANCHLINE for the
car and some additional parts from KADEE® and ACCURAIL®.

As for this coming event the space is now limited and is filling quickly, so
if you are available to come to the event and would like to be included for
this years project please let Mike Brock know... OFFLINE... and please CC me
in the note. I have included those who have spoken up. So, if you thought you
were included and don't see your name let us know upon reading this
update...


1.) Denny Anspach
2.) Mont Switzer
3.) John Greedy
4.) Jim Singer
5.) Armand Premo
6.) Clark Propst
7.) Ken Edmier
8.) Roger Hinman
9.) Murrie Helton
10.) Richard Berry
11.) Bob Putt
12.) Rob Gross
13.) Mike Moore
14.) Jerry Glow
15.) Bill Welch
16.) John Wheeler
17.) Mark Kerrlick
18.) Mike Brock

Thanks,

Greg Martin




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products.
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Re: The Keystone Modeler - December 2007

George R. Stilwell, Jr. <GRSJr@...>
 

Thanks for the help. The URL you gave shows the December issue.

Ray


Madden's NEW project

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Tom,

For those of us who started with the cast lead ends, metal sides, and hand shaped wood, your latest efforts with the rapid prototyping is opening a whole new era. A tip of the hat for trying new technology, and the expenses incurred. Having shared the photos you may start getting commissions to make parts for others. Many thanks for bringing this technology home to the modelers in a way that is sefl explanitory. And to think, we thought wire grabs and full brake detail were the in thing. GREAT JOB !!!

Fred Freitas
Bennington, VT


Re: inexpensive wire drills

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

Widget Supply sells small drills 10 for $2.29. I ordered a variety of
small number drills from them and am quite satisfied. At about 23
cents each I have no complaints.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: New Haven "shorty" boxcars - help needed

al_brown03
 

--- In STMFC@..., "laramielarry" <ostresh@...> wrote:

Hi Folks

Before I post the DS/SS/Steel split for the New Haven, I thought I
would see if any of you can help me reduce the 25% "Unknown" rate
to something more reasonable.

All of the Unknowns are "shorty" boxcars (36'0" or 36'3"), class
XM, with steel underframes. The interior heights are either 8'5"
or 8'6". Based on a Mainline Modeler article by Chris Barkan and
John Nehrich (July 1988), I assume that most or all of them are
double sheathed. However, Pieter Roos mentions that some New Haven
boxcars built between 1902 and 1912 were rebuilt into single
sheathed cars between 1926 and 1929 (message #14917). So it is
possible that some of the Unknown series are SS.

I don't have the Barkan and Nehrich follow-up article (Mainline
Modeler, September 1988); perhaps some of the following series are
identified there.
No, they aren't.

Series, IL, Capy, number of cars
61161-61653, 36'0", 80K, 6 cars in 1942(this was series 61005-61984
in 1945, 29 cars)
62219-62861, 36'0", 80K, 12 in 1942 (this was series 62031-62993 in
1945, 24 cars)


Most of the following series persisted until 1945, though there
were fewer cars and some of the series numbers were contracted from
those shown.

Series, IL, Capy, number of cars
63000-63999, 36'0", 80K, 451 in 1940
DS. NH 63849 is shown in Nimke, "Central New England", vol 3, p99.

64000-64099, 36'0", 80K, 35 in 1940
64100-64199, 36'0", 80K, 47 in 1940
65000-67850, 36'3", 80K, 1655 in 1940
DS. NH 67818 is shown in Lee, "Down Along the Old Bel-Del", pp334-335.

70000-70999, 36'0", 80K, 696 in 1940
In Maywald, "Classic Freight Cars", vol 1, p 11, is shown a *SS* car
in work service. The revenue number is hard to read but I think it's
70204.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

85000-87850, 36'3", 60K, 429 in 1940
158000-158299, 36'3", 60K, 11 in 1940
171000-172399, 36'3", 80K, 3 in 1940

Maybe one way to classify the above cars as double sheathed would
be to see if they are NOT the SS cars that Pieter mentions???
Anyone know what series the SS cars were?

Best wishes
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming


Re: inexpensive wire drills

Jim & Lisa Hayes <jimandlisa97225@...>
 

I get my cheapie drill bits from Model Expo www.modelexpo-online.com
<http://www.modelexpo-online.com/> . $3.49 for a pack of 10. Search for HSS
drill bit. They're good enough for most of what I do and they usually last
until I drop my Dremel on the floor.



Jim Hayes

Portland Oregon

_


Western Maryland Gondolas

Paul Catapano
 

I was asked to pass this along. Please respond to me off list, or Don directly.
Thank you.

Paul Catapano

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I need help finding
photos of the following WM Gondolas for the upcoming freight car
book. The letters after the class are my addition to separate car
groups within the same class. Any help would be appreciated.

"Don McFall" oldlinegraphics@...

Round Herald
G-13 B 54911-54920
G-11 51201-51300
G-17 5456-5460
Speed Lettered
G-13 B 54911-54920
G-21 5408-5417
G-26 B 55139-55175
G-27 A 55176-55190
G-27 B 55191-55205
G-27 C 55206-55233
G-27 D 55234-55261
G-28 A 55262-55291
G-28 B 55292-55306
G-35 56001-56020
G-42 A 55638-55697
G-42 B 55698-55703
G-43 A 55704-55757


DS/SS split 1945 to 1950: NH (was New Haven "shorty" boxcars - help needed)

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., " Westerfield" <westerfield@...> wrote:

Larry - See our 10500 series at www.westerfield.biz for the earliest
such cars and as rebuilt. F&C at one time made the succeeding series
from about 1906. -
Al Westerfield


Thanks Al

After viewing your website, I conclude that the 70000-70999 series
were single sheathed and the 85000-87850 series were double sheathed
for 1945 through 1950. The other "Unknown" series are not listed on
your site, but a reasonable guess is that they were all DS. On that
assumption, here are the DS/SS/Steel splits for boxcars on the New
Haven for January 1945, April 1949 and July 1950:

NH_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____2,901____50_____23
SS_____577____43_____18
Steel_____2,998____5,973_____5,967
Other_____0____0_____0
Unknown_____0____0_____0
Total_____6,476____6,066_____6,008

NH_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____44.8%____0.8%_____0.4%
SS_____8.9%____0.7%_____0.3%
Steel_____46.3%____98.5%_____99.3%
Other_____0.0%____0.0%_____0.0%
Unknown_____0.0%____0.0%_____0.0%
Total_____100.0%____100.0%_____100.0%

*** Warning: The following series are believed to be double
sheathed, and are included as such in the above tables, but this has
not been verified:
Series, IL, Capy, number of cars 1945
61005-61984, 36'0", 80K, 29
62031-62993, 36'0", 80K, 24
63020-63997, 36'0", 80K, 160
64016-64095, 36'0", 80K, 16
64116-64195, 36'0", 80K, 6
65004-67850, 36'3", 80K, 712
Of these 947 unverified cars, 14 remained in 1949 and 6 in 1950.

Best wishes,
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming


Re: Rapid prototyping parts photos uploaded

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Tom Madden" <tgmadden@...> wrote:

At the risk of offending the freight car sensibilities of the members
of this august forum, I hesitantly mention that I've put a 12-page PDF
file on my web site showing assorted passenger car parts made using
rapid prototyping:

http://home.att.net/~pullmanproject/Pullman_parts.pdf

Tom Madden
Tom,

Wow. One of the most significant items posted to this list in a long
time, and no one says Boo. I guess it's true, no one builds from
scratch anymore.

Thanks for posting the pix, especially those with the strong side
lighting. There are some of us who have been watching this technology
for years, but have always been put off by that little phrase that
always gets mentioned almost as an afterthought between all the copy
that says how easy it is to design parts, and all the copy that says
how well they turn out: "After minor hand finishing…" As one can see
from the photos, the surface isn't much good unless it can be sanded,
and there isn't much hope of sanding if there are rivets present.

The technology would be most useful for freeform 3-D shapes, but that
is that very area where the most hand work is required. The clerestory
roof pattern looks good, after the handwork, but only for a wood and
canvas roof. Both Branchline and Walthers have just recently raised
the bar, so to speak, and now we expect to actually have rivets on
models of riveted roofs.

One thing that ought to be stressed again, is the technology is still
really only useful for patterns. It's too limited in the geometry it
can do a good job of rendering, and too costly for one-offs. One can't
expect to just load in a file and have a complete 3-D model pop out.

Mr. Spock's replicator, it ain't.

Dennis


Re: New Haven "shorty" boxcars - help needed

Westerfield <westerfield@...>
 

Larry - See our 10500 series at www.westerfield.biz for the earliest such cars and as rebuilt. F&C at one time made the succeeding series from about 1906. - Al Westerfield

----- Original Message -----
From: laramielarry
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, December 08, 2007 3:31 PM
Subject: [STMFC] New Haven "shorty" boxcars - help needed


Hi Folks

Before I post the DS/SS/Steel split for the New Haven, I thought I
would see if any of you can help me reduce the 25% "Unknown" rate to
something more reasonable.

All of the Unknowns are "shorty" boxcars (36'0" or 36'3"), class XM,
with steel underframes. The interior heights are either 8'5" or
8'6". Based on a Mainline Modeler article by Chris Barkan and John
Nehrich (July 1988), I assume that most or all of them are double
sheathed. However, Pieter Roos mentions that some New Haven boxcars
built between 1902 and 1912 were rebuilt into single sheathed cars
between 1926 and 1929 (message #14917). So it is possible that some
of the Unknown series are SS.

I don't have the Barkan and Nehrich follow-up article (Mainline
Modeler, September 1988); perhaps some of the following series are
identified there.

Series, IL, Capy, number of cars
61161-61653, 36'0", 80K, 6 cars in 1942(this was series 61005-61984
in 1945, 29 cars)
62219-62861, 36'0", 80K, 12 in 1942 (this was series 62031-62993 in
1945, 24 cars)

Most of the following series persisted until 1945, though there were
fewer cars and some of the series numbers were contracted from those
shown.

Series, IL, Capy, number of cars
63000-63999, 36'0", 80K, 451 in 1940
64000-64099, 36'0", 80K, 35 in 1940
64100-64199, 36'0", 80K, 47 in 1940
65000-67850, 36'3", 80K, 1655 in 1940
70000-70999, 36'0", 80K, 696 in 1940
85000-87850, 36'3", 60K, 429 in 1940
158000-158299, 36'3", 60K, 11 in 1940
171000-172399, 36'3", 80K, 3 in 1940

Maybe one way to classify the above cars as double sheathed would be
to see if they are NOT the SS cars that Pieter mentions??? Anyone
know what series the SS cars were?

Best wishes
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming


New Haven "shorty" boxcars - help needed

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

Hi Folks

Before I post the DS/SS/Steel split for the New Haven, I thought I
would see if any of you can help me reduce the 25% "Unknown" rate to
something more reasonable.

All of the Unknowns are "shorty" boxcars (36'0" or 36'3"), class XM,
with steel underframes. The interior heights are either 8'5" or
8'6". Based on a Mainline Modeler article by Chris Barkan and John
Nehrich (July 1988), I assume that most or all of them are double
sheathed. However, Pieter Roos mentions that some New Haven boxcars
built between 1902 and 1912 were rebuilt into single sheathed cars
between 1926 and 1929 (message #14917). So it is possible that some
of the Unknown series are SS.

I don't have the Barkan and Nehrich follow-up article (Mainline
Modeler, September 1988); perhaps some of the following series are
identified there.

Series, IL, Capy, number of cars
61161-61653, 36'0", 80K, 6 cars in 1942(this was series 61005-61984
in 1945, 29 cars)
62219-62861, 36'0", 80K, 12 in 1942 (this was series 62031-62993 in
1945, 24 cars)


Most of the following series persisted until 1945, though there were
fewer cars and some of the series numbers were contracted from those
shown.

Series, IL, Capy, number of cars
63000-63999, 36'0", 80K, 451 in 1940
64000-64099, 36'0", 80K, 35 in 1940
64100-64199, 36'0", 80K, 47 in 1940
65000-67850, 36'3", 80K, 1655 in 1940
70000-70999, 36'0", 80K, 696 in 1940
85000-87850, 36'3", 60K, 429 in 1940
158000-158299, 36'3", 60K, 11 in 1940
171000-172399, 36'3", 80K, 3 in 1940

Maybe one way to classify the above cars as double sheathed would be
to see if they are NOT the SS cars that Pieter mentions??? Anyone
know what series the SS cars were?

Best wishes
Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming


Re: Anybody have any info about Richfield's Tank Car fleet?

Miles C
 

I've checked out wikipedia, gone to the traveltown website, and not had much
luck outside of that.

I model the 1940's-1950's and was wondering if any models out there are
accurate for ROX cars. (or at least close?)

I don't have good access to ORER's could anybody help me there?

-Miles C.


Re: inexpensive wire drills

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

For use on plastic and resin you can slide a bit on quality (*) and get import stuff from an industrial supply company like ENCO, MSC, or McMaster-Carr. About the best way is to get with 11 friends and buy the drills in their packages of 12 and make your own sets. For example, getting twelve #76 drills reduces the per drill cost by 15% over buying them singly.

(*) To be honest, most people will ruin a drill from improper technique - or just lose it - long before the difference in life between excellent and OK is noticed. . .

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: ed_mines
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, December 08, 2007 1:22 PM
Subject: [STMFC] inexpensive wire drills


Anyone know where to buy inexpensive wire drills like #s 75-80?

----- Original Message -----


inexpensive wire drills

ed_mines
 

Anyone know where to buy inexpensive wire drills like #s 75-80?

Ed Mines


Re: Resin stiles

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

Recognizing that it might well be age and skills-level related, I found that drilling out the resin ladder styles to be one of the most irritating and unrewarding tasks in all my years of kit building. After hours and hours of mind-numbing frustration (the usual time to build an ordinary kit) , I finally assembled two end ladders. However, the next morning when I looked at the finished products, both ladders looked as if they had gone through a war. I pulled them off and replaced them with Tichy ladder- not quite the same, but in my state of mind at the time (unchanged since), eminently acceptable.

I have thought of better ways to do the same thing. I know that one resin producer is thinking of etched pre-drilled styles. An untested idea of mine is to again use the Tichy (or other) suitable syrene ladder, and use the molded steps as an index for drilling the styles. Then, remove each molded step one at a time, each time sequentially replacing it with a drop step. As I say, untested.

I have a very high precision miniature drill press with Albrecht chuck. It is irrelevant to a practical solution, IMHO.

I will not attempt to fabricate any more ladders with resin styles.

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento


DS/SS split 1945 to 1950: WABASH correction

laramielarry <ostresh@...>
 

Hi Folks

In my earlier post of the DS/SS split for the WABASH, 12 SS cars were
inadvertently classified DS in 1945. Here are the corrected numbers
and percentages:

WABASH_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____3,399____1,429_____659
SS_____5,036____4,976_____4,936
Steel_____3,984____5,683_____6,175
Unknown_____0____0_____0
Total_____12,419____12,088_____11,770

WABASH_____1945____1949_____1950
DS_____27.4%____11.8%_____5.6%
SS_____40.6%____41.2%_____41.9%
Steel_____32.1%____47.0%_____52.5%
Unknown_____0.0%____0.0%_____0.0%
Total_____100.0%____100.0%_____100.0%

I apologize for the error.

Larry Ostresh
Laramie, Wyoming

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