Date   

Re: HO Freight Car Truck Axle Lengths

Ken Adams
 

I just fitted 3 sets of new Moloco .088 wheels to 3 pair of Tichy Andrews trucks and they went in with no problem and are free rolling. 
--
Ken Adams
Still in splendid Shelter In Place solitude, about half way up Walnut Creek
Owner PlasticFreightCarBuilders@groups.io


Re: Anyone recognize what road owns this single sheathed auto box car?

Eric Hansmann
 

It looks like a Burlington Route emblem is on the upper part of the door.


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On 07/07/2021 8:39 AM Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi List Members,

Anyone recognize what road owns this single sheathed auto box car?


Metadata can be found at the link below


Also, why is ice involved in this scene?

Enjoy!

Claus Schlund


Interesting NKP double door boxcar

Tom Madden
 

This photo was posted to the Lackawanna Facebook group this morning by administrator Bob Bahrs. Taken at Port Morris, NJ, date unspecified. The photographer, Mr. Barry, seems to have been the company photographer and was active during the early 20th century.

Tom Madden


T&P and PRR (class K7a) stock cars Philadelphia PA 1956

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
T&P and PRR (class K7a) stock cars Philadelphia PA 1956
 
 
Metadata can be found at the link below
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Anyone recognize what road owns this single sheathed auto box car?

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Anyone recognize what road owns this single sheathed auto box car?
 
 
Metadata can be found at the link below
 
 
Also, why is ice involved in this scene?
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Wabash 47103 40ft auto box Philadelphia PA 1951

Richard Townsend
 

That reminds me: we need a source for 3/3/3 ends. If I knew how I’d design one myself for 3D printing.


On Jul 7, 2021, at 7:03 AM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi List Members,
 
Wabash 47103 40ft auto box Philadelphia PA 1951
 
 
Metadata can be found at the link below
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: HO Freight Car Truck Axle Lengths

Raymond Stern
 

Mark,

For over 25 years I have successfully used Northwest Shortline
.088 wheel sets with 33" and 36" wheels. They come in three 
axle lengths, .944", 1.015", and 1.025". The .944" works well
in Atlas trucks.

Raymond


Wabash 47103 40ft auto box Philadelphia PA 1951

Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Wabash 47103 40ft auto box Philadelphia PA 1951
 
 
Metadata can be found at the link below
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Distressing Plastic Freight Cars

Tim O'Connor
 

Andy

As a teenager I recall slathering the interior of a gondola (Mantua or Tyco or such) with Testor's
liquid cement (of the type sold in the 1960's) and it caused the sides of the car to soften and bow
inwards, which is what I was trying to do. But Arrowhead probably has done the best thing - make
the sides from etched metal!

Tim O'Connor


On 7/6/2021 11:18 PM, Andy Carlson wrote:

This doesn't answer the OP's question but an option for gondola side distortion is available for those who cast their own gondolas.

Resin is off course a liquid when poured into the mold and within time it morphs into a solidified casting (which we have been purchasing for decades now). Along the way to being a solid casting, the urethane passes through a range of hardness from liquid to pure solid.

I experimented on a mold from an HO WP Greenville built 29' coil steel gondola side and got some promising results. While still "green" in the mold, picking on the sides with a somewhat pointed, blunt object, outward dents were created. One thing that I discovered was while still in the mold, the distressed green castings tended to revert back to un-dented. The most serious distresses were from de-molding the sides and doing the pointing with the pointed/blunt object while the green casting was on a piece of foam board.

We whom are older than 40 years remember the model presses suggestions of using heated soldering irons from the inside of plastic gondolas to get the dents. Problem was, the resulting dents did not scale well and to me the results looked forced and not very effective. The resin dents, however showed some rather realistic effects.

With all of the YouTube videos offering intros to home resin casting tutorials, and with the readily availability of resins and RTVs, climb on in....the weather is fine!
-Andy Carlson


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Pre-painted resin box car castings

Robert kirkham
 

That is a cool idea!  Would like to see an example of the weathered version as well.


Rob

On Jul 6, 2021, at 8:42 PM, Andy Carlson <midcentury@...> wrote:

I received an order from a STMFC'er this past weekend for one of my resin box car casting sets. This particular one was for a Western Pacific 40' single sheathed z-bar trussed box car.

Since I have been playing around with painting car side molds prior to pouring in the poly urethane resin to see the viability for giving different opportunities for modeling.

The pre-painting molds is exactly what fiberglass boats and Corvettes get their "gel Coat Finishes". One interesting aspect of this is that the surface finish of the mold is transferred 100% to the painted surface so the results are essentially a perfect paint finish.

Another experiment was doing a multi-layer painted mold, visible color followed by hair spray followed with a darkened grey/black color. This allows the use of scratching the paint to mimic the peeling paint distressed car body sides where the exposed wood has weathered to a dark patina.
<WP 40' SS Wayne boxcar.jpg>
This is an example of the paint weathering on one of these WP 40' SS box cars in their final use in Gypsum service.

Pictured below is some of the set of castings for this special order. In addition to the really close WP mineral red color, the hair spray and grey/black colors are under the red. With the initially fully intact mineral red, the builder can use his fiberglass erasure to any level from mild to extreme.

<101_6444.jpeg>

My camera is changing the red color from the close match of the above prototype. Our very own Garth Groff recommended to me an Ace Hardware brand of primer which looks very good compared with vintage color photos of the prototypes.

With a coat of Pledge with Future Acrylic floor coating, one could go to decaling rather quickly. (Please ignore the dust and loose bits of dirt on the pictured castings--next time I will dust before shooting). Besides the viewed sides and ends, I also did the same pre-paint to the roof's mold.

Everyone do well and stay safe,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA





<WP 40' SS Wayne boxcar.jpg><101_6444.jpeg>


Re: caboose colors

Charlie Vlk
 

There is a cabinet card currently on eXxx showing an early Great Northern caboose with dark color drop shadows on lighter color lettering.  The car body might be varnished natural wood or perhaps a shade of yellow/ ocher.  Lettering is of a style recognizable as a forerunner of STMFC patterns.
Charlie Vlk



On Jul 6, 2021, at 11:14 PM, Jim Betz <jimbetz@...> wrote:

Ray,
  I don't think you are taking the date of that article (1906) nor the source (Leavenworth Times, a
newspaper) enough into consideration.  I do not know what color the GN cabeese were in 1906
but, to be perfectly honest, using a newspaper article to determine the 'proper/right' color for a
GN caboose in 1906 seems ... to me at least ... dubious.  It's probably better than nothing at
all but I don't know how much better nor how much stock you should take as it being "a
reliable source".
  It would not surprise me to learn that the GN crummies were tuscan/mineral red in 1906.
But I'd prefer to have a different information source.  At best, it would seem that an article
in the Leavenworth Times is 'good for Leavenworth' ... but since practices on the GN in that
era were considerably different ... it may not apply to what was happening in the Twin Cities.
I believe that the GN and almost all RRs in the early 1900s assigned the caboose to a
specific conductor (as opposed to a "train") and so when the crew was changed out so
was the caboose.  That would mean that if Leavenworth was a division point in the first
decade of the 1900s that any way car the reporter might have seen would be ones that
were assigned to Leavenworth and the lines on either side/around Leavenworth ... but
probably didn't run thru to Spokane, Seattle, etc.  A good guess might be from Leavenworth
to Wenatchee?
                                                                                                        - Jim 


Re: caboose colors

Jim Betz
 

Ray,
  I don't think you are taking the date of that article (1906) nor the source (Leavenworth Times, a
newspaper) enough into consideration.  I do not know what color the GN cabeese were in 1906
but, to be perfectly honest, using a newspaper article to determine the 'proper/right' color for a
GN caboose in 1906 seems ... to me at least ... dubious.  It's probably better than nothing at
all but I don't know how much better nor how much stock you should take as it being "a
reliable source".
  It would not surprise me to learn that the GN crummies were tuscan/mineral red in 1906.
But I'd prefer to have a different information source.  At best, it would seem that an article
in the Leavenworth Times is 'good for Leavenworth' ... but since practices on the GN in that
era were considerably different ... it may not apply to what was happening in the Twin Cities.
I believe that the GN and almost all RRs in the early 1900s assigned the caboose to a
specific conductor (as opposed to a "train") and so when the crew was changed out so
was the caboose.  That would mean that if Leavenworth was a division point in the first
decade of the 1900s that any way car the reporter might have seen would be ones that
were assigned to Leavenworth and the lines on either side/around Leavenworth ... but
probably didn't run thru to Spokane, Seattle, etc.  A good guess might be from Leavenworth
to Wenatchee?
                                                                                                        - Jim 


Pre-painted resin box car castings

Andy Carlson
 

I received an order from a STMFC'er this past weekend for one of my resin box car casting sets. This particular one was for a Western Pacific 40' single sheathed z-bar trussed box car.

Since I have been playing around with painting car side molds prior to pouring in the poly urethane resin to see the viability for giving different opportunities for modeling.

The pre-painting molds is exactly what fiberglass boats and Corvettes get their "gel Coat Finishes". One interesting aspect of this is that the surface finish of the mold is transferred 100% to the painted surface so the results are essentially a perfect paint finish.

Another experiment was doing a multi-layer painted mold, visible color followed by hair spray followed with a darkened grey/black color. This allows the use of scratching the paint to mimic the peeling paint distressed car body sides where the exposed wood has weathered to a dark patina.
Inline image
This is an example of the paint weathering on one of these WP 40' SS box cars in their final use in Gypsum service.

Pictured below is some of the set of castings for this special order. In addition to the really close WP mineral red color, the hair spray and grey/black colors are under the red. With the initially fully intact mineral red, the builder can use his fiberglass erasure to any level from mild to extreme.

Inline image

My camera is changing the red color from the close match of the above prototype. Our very own Garth Groff recommended to me an Ace Hardware brand of primer which looks very good compared with vintage color photos of the prototypes.

With a coat of Pledge with Future Acrylic floor coating, one could go to decaling rather quickly. (Please ignore the dust and loose bits of dirt on the pictured castings--next time I will dust before shooting). Besides the viewed sides and ends, I also did the same pre-paint to the roof's mold.

Everyone do well and stay safe,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA






Distressing Plastic Freight Cars

Andy Carlson
 

This doesn't answer the OP's question but an option for gondola side distortion is available for those who cast their own gondolas.

Resin is off course a liquid when poured into the mold and within time it morphs into a solidified casting (which we have been purchasing for decades now). Along the way to being a solid casting, the urethane passes through a range of hardness from liquid to pure solid.

I experimented on a mold from an HO WP Greenville built 29' coil steel gondola side and got some promising results. While still "green" in the mold, picking on the sides with a somewhat pointed, blunt object, outward dents were created. One thing that I discovered was while still in the mold, the distressed green castings tended to revert back to un-dented. The most serious distresses were from de-molding the sides and doing the pointing with the pointed/blunt object while the green casting was on a piece of foam board.

We whom are older than 40 years remember the model presses suggestions of using heated soldering irons from the inside of plastic gondolas to get the dents. Problem was, the resulting dents did not scale well and to me the results looked forced and not very effective. The resin dents, however showed some rather realistic effects.

With all of the YouTube videos offering intros to home resin casting tutorials, and with the readily availability of resins and RTVs, climb on in....the weather is fine!
-Andy Carlson



Re: HO Freight Car Truck Axle Lengths

Richard Townsend
 

In my youth, which was a long time ago, I loved the appearance of the AHM truck compared to the Athearn, The AHM truck sideframes seemed "sharp" while the Athearn sideframes seemed "muddy" to me. But the AHM trucks were so wide.  I would have loved to see AHM trucks much closer to scale width with shorter axles.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


-----Original Message-----
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Sent: Tue, Jul 6, 2021 7:24 pm
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] HO Freight Car Truck Axle Lengths

Accurail trucks are SUPPOSED to work with axles up to and including 1.015" long, but that is the max, unless you twirl "the Tool" in the journals and make the cone break out of the sides of the boxes a tiny bit. The general move to shorter axles over the years has been most gratifying, allowing for exact scale width on even 40 ton trucks, but it wasn't always that way; the NMRA RP sets the maximum length at 1.035"... zounds!

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.


Re: Distressing Plastic Freight Cars

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

On Tue, Jul 6, 2021 at 06:50 PM, Bob Chaparro wrote:
How did you keep the floor from deforming?
Plastic injection moldings have a LOT of unrelieved stress frozen in place, and if you soften the entire molding, it likely will turn into a cross between a strip of bacon and a croissant. Possibly a couple car weights laying on the floor would be enough to keep it cool, but it's doubtful. It seems a heat gun would be give more control to only heat the sides.

Dennis Storzek


Re: HO Freight Car Truck Axle Lengths

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

Accurail trucks are SUPPOSED to work with axles up to and including 1.015" long, but that is the max, unless you twirl "the Tool" in the journals and make the cone break out of the sides of the boxes a tiny bit. The general move to shorter axles over the years has been most gratifying, allowing for exact scale width on even 40 ton trucks, but it wasn't always that way; the NMRA RP sets the maximum length at 1.035"... zounds!

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc.


Distressing Plastic Freight Cars

Bob Chaparro
 

Distressing Plastic Freight Cars

Serious Question:

Has anyone tried using an air fryer to soften a plastic gondola or hopper so that the sides could be distressed?

What temperature did you use?

How did you keep the floor from deforming?

Thanks.

Any yes, I am aware of other methods for deforming plastic freight cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Friction Bearings – How Old Is This Term?

Nelson Moyer
 

I came late to this thread, but the first time ‘friction bearing’ was used related to truck journals was in the March 1956 Model Railroader. ‘Solid bearings’ was first mentioned relative to truck journals in the October 1941 issue of Model Railroader.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Clarence Zink
Sent: Tuesday, July 6, 2021 6:21 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Friction Bearings – How Old Is This Term?

 

As a model railroader professionally employed in the oil & gas, water well, geotechnical, and mineral drilling businesses since 1972, the "friction bearing" has been used in the drill bit field for several decades, and is understood to be a lubricated, sliding contact type bearing.  In the drilling business, the term "friction bearing" is interchangeable with "journal bearing", and represent certain characteristics for durability.  A friction/journal bearing may consist of an internal stationary spindle in direct contact with the external "rolling cone" (which breaks the rock), or it may have a 'bushing' between the rolling cone and spindle.  In any case, metal slides against metal.  It must be lubricated, or the friction will quickly destroy the bearing.  In the drilling business, these types of drill bits are always "sealed", to prevent contamination by drill cuttings, and premature destruction of the bearings.

As opposed to a "roller bearing" type drill bit, which consists of a rolling cone (which breaks the rock), the stationary spindle, and conventional "roller bearings" inserted between the cone and spindle.  In this type of drill bit, the bearing system may or may not be "sealed", depending on the drilling application.  If the roller bearing is sealed, then the drill bit is intended to be used with a drilling fluid to flush cuttings from the hole.  If the roller bearing is not sealed, it is termed either an "open bearing" bit or an "air bearing" bit.  If an "open bearing" type, then the drill bit is intended to be used as a "throw away" type bit with a limited life. with either liquid or non liquid flushing medium.  If it is an "air bearing" bit, it is intended to be used with extremely large quantities of compressed air as the flushing medium, and is intended to be used to destruction.

Drill bits used in the mining, geotechnical, and water well drilling businesses, while carefully designed, engineered, and manufactured, generally have somewhat looser tolerances than bits for oil & gas, and are generally significantly less expensive, because the 'cost of failure' is simply not as high.

Yeah, more than you wanted to know about drill bits.

Best regards,

CRZ


Re: Friction Bearings – How Old Is This Term?

Clarence Zink
 

As a model railroader professionally employed in the oil & gas, water well, geotechnical, and mineral drilling businesses since 1972, the "friction bearing" has been used in the drill bit field for several decades, and is understood to be a lubricated, sliding contact type bearing.  In the drilling business, the term "friction bearing" is interchangeable with "journal bearing", and represent certain characteristics for durability.  A friction/journal bearing may consist of an internal stationary spindle in direct contact with the external "rolling cone" (which breaks the rock), or it may have a 'bushing' between the rolling cone and spindle.  In any case, metal slides against metal.  It must be lubricated, or the friction will quickly destroy the bearing.  In the drilling business, these types of drill bits are always "sealed", to prevent contamination by drill cuttings, and premature destruction of the bearings.

As opposed to a "roller bearing" type drill bit, which consists of a rolling cone (which breaks the rock), the stationary spindle, and conventional "roller bearings" inserted between the cone and spindle.  In this type of drill bit, the bearing system may or may not be "sealed", depending on the drilling application.  If the roller bearing is sealed, then the drill bit is intended to be used with a drilling fluid to flush cuttings from the hole.  If the roller bearing is not sealed, it is termed either an "open bearing" bit or an "air bearing" bit.  If an "open bearing" type, then the drill bit is intended to be used as a "throw away" type bit with a limited life. with either liquid or non liquid flushing medium.  If it is an "air bearing" bit, it is intended to be used with extremely large quantities of compressed air as the flushing medium, and is intended to be used to destruction.

Drill bits used in the mining, geotechnical, and water well drilling businesses, while carefully designed, engineered, and manufactured, generally have somewhat looser tolerances than bits for oil & gas, and are generally significantly less expensive, because the 'cost of failure' is simply not as high.

Yeah, more than you wanted to know about drill bits.

Best regards,

CRZ