Date   

Re: PRR freight stations, was A curious aspect in the Delano photo

Jack Mullen
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:



-----Original Message-----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD

... 35 freight "station delivery" operations
in August 1918,
with 1,444 carloads in and 468 carloads out, for these small
freight houses.
Yes, Elden, interesting. 1444 inbound for 35 stations works out to
~41 per station, less that one
weekly. Clearly, some were more busy than others, so some stations
were probably at one car per
month. As much as I do like to think that "everything" came by
rail, for one car per month, the
investment in siding, building, agent (maybe), and
maintenance . . . . seems hard to believe this is
all economically justifiable. And the fall to 14 is probably a
reflection of which houses were
busy, and which were not.

SGL
Unless I'm misinterpreting Eldon's message, the carloadings are one
month's traffic, so that's better than one car per station per day
(or not quite two per weekday). Outbound is about a third of that.
And remember that this is for 1918. Certainly "everything" didn't
come by rail, but if the origin wasn't local, it didn't come by road.

Jack


Re: Question on D&H USRA box/hopper conversions.

Pieter Roos
 

Richard, thanks once again for your help. I guess this car will be a
straight boxcar. Possibly I'll look for another USRA SS car to build
into the B&O version of the cement car. That is well covered in the
B&O Modeler article.

Pieter

--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

On Jun 26, 2007, at 6:11 PM, pieter_roos wrote:

I'm at the early stages of adding a Viking roof to a USRA SS boxcar
for the D&H per Ted Cullota's article. I had been planning to also
make it one of the cement car conversions with hoppers and roof
hatches. Before I commit myself by modifying the roof or under frame,
does any know if the Viking roof cars were used in these conversions
or were they based on one of the other roof types? It wold seem
easier
to add the hatches to flatter roof rather than the Viking
corrugations. I've searched the archives back to 2001 without finding
the answer.
Pieter, I have photos of one of these cars which was still in sand
service (or had recently been retired from that service) at Oneonta, NY
in the mid-1980s. This car, D&H 35461 (obviously renumbered from its
original number) had a Hutchins Dry Lading roof and four relatively
small hatch covers on the roof just to the left and right of the side
door openings. The side sheathing panels on either side of the doors
had been steel plated. Like you, I doubt that any Viking-roofed cars
got hatches.

Richard Hendrickson




Re: Santa Fe & PFE's-Erie Citrus Traffic

Ljack70117@...
 

My granddad was a guard at a cookie factory in Kansas City Ks. You could eat all the cookies you wanted but none could leave the factory.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Jun 27, 2007, at 7:21 PM, Chet French wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., "Russ Strodtz" <sheridan@...> wrote:

And we have not even discussed the gratuities paid to yard or local
crews in order to get the empties spotted in the first place.
Candy bars and peanuts in the shell were the norm from several grain
elevators we spotted and pulled. It was more of a thank you gift than
a bribe. Farmers must eat alot of peanuts. At the Huber brewery in
Monroe, Wisc., we could drink beer in the building, but not take any
off the property. It came out of what looked like a water faucet in
the wall.

Chet French
Dixon, IL




Yahoo! Groups Links



PRR freight stations, was A curious aspect in the Delano photo

Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Just for those interested, the PRR on the Monongahela
Division/Branch alone
(which did not include the big Pgh freight houses, only the
small local
operations), hosted 35 freight "station delivery" operations
in August 1918,
with 1,444 carloads in and 468 carloads out, for these small
freight houses.
This fell to only 14 freight houses by 1962. Even one of them
would make for
a really interesting shelf layout!
Yes, Elden, interesting. 1444 inbound for 35 stations works out to ~41 per station, less that one
weekly. Clearly, some were more busy than others, so some stations were probably at one car per
month. As much as I do like to think that "everything" came by rail, for one car per month, the
investment in siding, building, agent (maybe), and maintenance . . . . seems hard to believe this is
all economically justifiable. And the fall to 14 is probably a reflection of which houses were
busy, and which were not.

SGL


NS 2bay hoppers

Fred Mullins
 

Folks,
I got a pair of the new kadee NS(orig) 2bay hoppers with coal
loads. But got to thinking that. I don't remember the NS serving any
coal mines? So I know they probadly had some customers that needed
coal but wouldn't it had come in off-line RR coal cars? Or would they
had sent some of the NS hoppers to be loaded off-line?? I know they
hauled gravel and wood chips in 2bay hoppers but coal?? Can anybody
shed some light on this?
Thanks
Fred Mullins


Re: A curious aspect in the Delano photo

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: Gatwood, Elden J SAD

Just for those interested, the PRR on the Monongahela Division/Branch alone
(which did not include the big Pgh freight houses, only the small local
operations), hosted 35 freight "station delivery" operations in August 1918,
with 1,444 carloads in and 468 carloads out, for these small freight houses.
This fell to only 14 freight houses by 1962. Even one of them would make for
a really interesting shelf layout!

----- Original Message -----

Elden, where can you find traffic info like this? You wouldn't happen have anything on any of the Beaver County branches, would you?

KL


scale conversions

Bud Rindfleisch
 

Rod, Andy, and all,
Thanks for the tips, etc. I have used the 10' line method on
drawings that have no known scale to get correct drawings in the scale
I need, usually S. I have never used the 10' line to check copier
accuracy, but it might be worthwhile. I think for my purposes the
accuracy can be off just a tad, which might be the width of the line
and no one would know the difference.
I've had this discussion with Andy before about "old" MR drawings
from the fifties being printed slightly oversize as copiers of the day
caused slight shrinkage from the original. I just copied the DL&W wood
caboose from the Feb. 1952 MR and the dimensions are all slightly
larger than the written dimensions. Not a big issue but still somewhat
off.
I guess the 10' line idea is the best check when getting copies!
Bud Rindfleisch


Re: Crew gratuities

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Dick Bale wrote:
At what point does a gratuity become a bride?
When she grows up and becomes cute enough <g>. In answer to what I think the question is, YMMV.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: 25-Jul-1959

Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Chet French" <cfrench@...> wrote:
"Fill to 75 cars"? That sounds strange. On the "Q" it was fill to
every
car that was available to be moved. No one ever restricted train
size.
I know for sure the IC West runs 200 car trains now. When did that
change?
Meant to add this to last post. I believe limiting the pick up to 75
cars allowed the train to fit in all the passing sidings between Broad
view and Freeport, and maintain the speed limit, which was 60 mph.
Cars were usually added to these trains at Freeport.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Re: 25-Jul-1959

Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

Russ,

Deliveries was made to the IHB on the West Pass, which held about 100
steam era cars. Usually a set-out was picked up by the IHB before
the next IC train delivered. On occasion an IC train with a 50 to 70
car set-out would have to tie unto cars in the west pass. This made
for an interesting move before radios as it was down hill, around a
curve, and behind a large building. It meant that the conductor and
both brakemen had to be on top spread out passing signals.

The IHB shoved the IC cars up to the four track yard along the IC
main lines east of 17th Ave.

Chet French
Dixon, IL

--- In STMFC@..., "Russ Strodtz" <sheridan@...> wrote:

Chet,

Yes, a similar track arrangement but with only one connecting track.
Did the IC shove out on the West Pass or just leave the cars on the
connecting track?

I can recall taking a few shots of a crew switching there. They
even had
the luxury of portable radios with lapel mikes. At that time
the "Q" did
not even have radios on all their locomotives, much less portables.
The
IHB did not start using radios until the mid 70's.

"Fill to 75 cars"? That sounds strange. On the "Q" it was fill to
every
car that was available to be moved. No one ever restricted train
size.
I know for sure the IC West runs 200 car trains now. When did that
change?

Russ
----- Original Message -----
From: "Chet French" <cfrench@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, 23 June, 2007 14:59
Subject: [STMFC] Re: 25-Jul-1959


Russ,

Very enjoyable reading. I never get tired of looking at train
consists and switch lists. I bet that Tony T. liked all the
PFE's
and their lading. Within a year of this day, I had hired out on
the
IC and was shoving similar cuts of cars to the IHB, a little
further
north of Congress Park, at Broadview. A big share of the loading
was
perishables from the UP at Council Bluffs, and PHP from the
various
meat packers from South Omaha to Dubuque. Our small four track
yard
at Broadview was always full of mty perishable and meat reefers.
Often a westbound crew would leave Hawthorne with just a caboose
with
a message, "Fill to 75 cars at Broadview". Of course, the clerks
always had certain cars picked out which created a small amount
of
switching.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Re: Santa Fe & PFE's-Erie Citrus Traffic

Chet French <cfrench@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Russ Strodtz" <sheridan@...> wrote:

And we have not even discussed the gratuities paid to yard or local
crews in order to get the empties spotted in the first place.
Candy bars and peanuts in the shell were the norm from several grain
elevators we spotted and pulled. It was more of a thank you gift than
a bribe. Farmers must eat alot of peanuts. At the Huber brewery in
Monroe, Wisc., we could drink beer in the building, but not take any
off the property. It came out of what looked like a water faucet in
the wall.

Chet French
Dixon, IL


Re: Crew gratuities

Tom Madden <tgmadden@...>
 

Dick Bale asked:
At what point does a gratuity become a bride?
That's called a dowry, which is money flowing _from_ the bride (or the
bride's family). I guess it's a gratuity, in the sense that it's for
services (to be) rendered.

As long as I'm asking questions, what does this thread have to do
with steam era freight cars?
Lubricant for the wheels and rails of commerce.

Tom Madden


Re: Crew gratuities

Paul <buygone@...>
 

Jeff:



Its "Koehler" brewery in Erie.



Paul C. Koehler



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Jeff
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2007 3:39 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Crew gratuities



The Kolher brewery in Erie, Pa was serviced by the NKP and later the
N&W, the crew that work them got a few cold ones off the line up
until they closed in 1978. It was a nice treat on those hot Summer
days.
Jeff Coleman

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com, "Dennis
Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups. <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> com, Anthony
Thompson <thompson@> wrote:

Crews switching produce sheds routinely loaded up on
whatever
the
commodity was, with the blessing of the shipper, of course. The
same
went for some other shippers with appropriate products to offer.
Then
switching a beer or liquor warehouse was special!
I knew a guy who worked as a brakeman on the Milwaukee Road's "Beer
Line" job during the sixties, when there were still three breweries
on
it. The crew expected a case of beer from each brewery every week.
for
each man.

Dennis


Re: Crew gratuities

Jeff Coleman
 

The Kolher brewery in Erie, Pa was serviced by the NKP and later the
N&W, the crew that work them got a few cold ones off the line up
until they closed in 1978. It was a nice treat on those hot Summer
days.
Jeff Coleman

--- In STMFC@..., "Dennis Storzek" <destorzek@...> wrote:

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@> wrote:

Crews switching produce sheds routinely loaded up on
whatever
the
commodity was, with the blessing of the shipper, of course. The
same
went for some other shippers with appropriate products to offer.
Then
switching a beer or liquor warehouse was special!
I knew a guy who worked as a brakeman on the Milwaukee Road's "Beer
Line" job during the sixties, when there were still three breweries
on
it. The crew expected a case of beer from each brewery every week…
for
each man.

Dennis


Re: Crew gratuities (was Santa Fe & PFE's-Erie Citrus Traffic)

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., timboconnor@... wrote:


But why was he dismissed? Car rental (per diem) on 30 gondolas has
to be quite a lot of money. Surely someone at the railroad pays that
bill?
The trainee was trying to save the RR a lot of money. Or did the
kickbacks
go higher up the chain?

Tim O'Connor
Because otherwise Pielet would route to short haul the originating
road for about the next year...

Dennis


Re: Crew gratuities

Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Anthony Thompson <thompson@...> wrote:

Crews switching produce sheds routinely loaded up on whatever
the
commodity was, with the blessing of the shipper, of course. The same
went for some other shippers with appropriate products to offer. Then
switching a beer or liquor warehouse was special!
I knew a guy who worked as a brakeman on the Milwaukee Road's "Beer
Line" job during the sixties, when there were still three breweries on
it. The crew expected a case of beer from each brewery every week… for
each man.

Dennis


Re: Question on D&H USRA box/hopper conversions.

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 26, 2007, at 6:11 PM, pieter_roos wrote:

I'm at the early stages of adding a Viking roof to a USRA SS boxcar
for the D&H per Ted Cullota's article. I had been planning to also
make it one of the cement car conversions with hoppers and roof
hatches. Before I commit myself by modifying the roof or under frame,
does any know if the Viking roof cars were used in these conversions
or were they based on one of the other roof types? It wold seem easier
to add the hatches to flatter roof rather than the Viking
corrugations. I've searched the archives back to 2001 without finding
the answer.
Pieter, I have photos of one of these cars which was still in sand
service (or had recently been retired from that service) at Oneonta, NY
in the mid-1980s. This car, D&H 35461 (obviously renumbered from its
original number) had a Hutchins Dry Lading roof and four relatively
small hatch covers on the roof just to the left and right of the side
door openings. The side sheathing panels on either side of the doors
had been steel plated. Like you, I doubt that any Viking-roofed cars
got hatches.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Crew gratuities

proto48er
 

--- In STMFC@..., "brianehni" <behni@...> wrote:

I distinctly remember as an underaged college student, railfanning
San Antonio with friends,
being offered a cab ride on the Pearl Brewery's electric boxcab
making a delivery run to the
SP interchange. I must have downned a couple of brewskis out of the
case they had iced
down. I suppose that since they were not RAILROAD employees,
Rule "G" did not apply.

Brian Ehni
Brian -

I experienced the exact same thing in the early 1960's at Pearl!
They had a beer cooler on the electric locomotive and would give
railfans rides through the streets to the SP interchange. Sadly, the
service was discontinued in 2000 and the Texas Transportation Co.
trackage was torn up in 2002.

A.T. Kott


Re: Coke Racks

cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

Although it's not quite what you are looking for, the C&O pulled the roofs off
USRA box cars and used them for coke.

CJ Riley


--- Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:

Jerry Michels wrote:

Could someone describe or direct me to photos of coke racks in a
hopper or gondola. I would like to know what they looked like and if
they are easy to model.

================================


Jerry,

I found one image featuring coke racks on the West Virginia &
Regional History Digital collection. You will probably need to edit
this in WORD to make it work.

http://images.lib.wvu.edu/cgi/i/image/image-idx?
rgn1=ic_all;op2=And;rgn2=ic_all;q1=coke;size=20;c=wvcp;back=back118297
7162;subview=detail;resnum=243;view=entry;lastview=thumbnail;cc=wvcp;e
ntryid=x-001730;viewid=001730.JPG

Here's a short link:
http://tinyurl.com/3yymtz

These are early Western Maryland Railway gons with side extensions to
haul more coke. Coke was lighter than coal, so the extensions were
used to haul more capacity. I know it isn't a great image, but that's
the best I can do right now. Nearly all of these WM cars were gone
when the last of the coke ovens served by the WM were closed in the
mid to late 1920s.

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.




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Re: Coke Racks

Eric Hansmann
 

Jerry Michels wrote:

Could someone describe or direct me to photos of coke racks in a
hopper or gondola. I would like to know what they looked like and if
they are easy to model.

================================


Jerry,

I found one image featuring coke racks on the West Virginia &
Regional History Digital collection. You will probably need to edit
this in WORD to make it work.

http://images.lib.wvu.edu/cgi/i/image/image-idx?
rgn1=ic_all;op2=And;rgn2=ic_all;q1=coke;size=20;c=wvcp;back=back118297
7162;subview=detail;resnum=243;view=entry;lastview=thumbnail;cc=wvcp;e
ntryid=x-001730;viewid=001730.JPG

Here's a short link:
http://tinyurl.com/3yymtz

These are early Western Maryland Railway gons with side extensions to
haul more coke. Coke was lighter than coal, so the extensions were
used to haul more capacity. I know it isn't a great image, but that's
the best I can do right now. Nearly all of these WM cars were gone
when the last of the coke ovens served by the WM were closed in the
mid to late 1920s.

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.

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