Date   

Re: strange C&NW cars

Ray Meyer
 

I've seen the picture before and had the same questions (since I scratch
built a model to this picture). They are obviously insulated box cars, and
if this were out east, I would say milk reefers. Probably to haul some
produce that did not refrigeration but protection from extremes of weather.

On 7/5/07, Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...> wrote:

Can anyone educate me on the purpose of these C&NW cars?
http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/1a34660uu.jpg
<http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/1a34660uu.jpg>

They have hinged, refrigerator car doors, but no ice hatches!

Are they rebuilds?

regards,

Andy Miller





--
Atty Raymond G. Meyer
110 E. Main St
Port Washington, WI 53074
262-284-5566
rgmeyer2@...


strange C&NW cars

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Can anyone educate me on the purpose of these C&NW cars?
http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/1a34660uu.jpg
<http://www.shorpy.com/files/images/1a34660uu.jpg>

They have hinged, refrigerator car doors, but no ice hatches!

Are they rebuilds?

regards,

Andy Miller


Re: Weathering DVD Now Available to Order!

smason22000 <smason2@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "pierreoliver2003" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Not to take anything away from Mike Rose and his incredible talent, I
have to concur with Ben's position on this matter.
The methods that I use for weathering freight cars change greatly
depending on the era of the car. I've observed that along with the
soot issue, paints fail differently, modern cars seem to have far more
rust "burn spots" and that modern cars do not seem to be as well
maintained.
At least thats' the way I see it.
Pierre Oliver

I agree with Pierre and Ben, and Mike and I address in detail the different ways modern
cars weather vs. steam era or transition cars. Mike does not limit himself to weathering
only modern cars in this DVD though.

In "Volume 2", which will be ready to pre-order next week, I focus on steam era cars, and
demonstrate weathering techniques using weathering powders and airbrushing to depict
the effects of soot, rain, dust, mud and rust.

Primarily, beyond soot, the main difference a steam era car rusts vs. a modern car, has to
do with the type of paint that was used. In the steam era, most cars were painted with
lead-based paint. Cars were pretty much bullet-proof, and didn't rust unless they were
scraped, dented, scratched or otherwise damaged.

What you saw was an accumulation of soot that washed down the sides and ends of the
car from the roof and accumulated along the rivet and weld seams as well as the door
tracks.

Dust, and mud could be seen along the underside, wheels, sideframes and bottom edges
of the cars. Rust could be found along hinges, door tracks, couplers and any other moving
parts.

Modern paints allow for blistering, fading and rapid aging, which is why you see lots of
rust on modern cars

Scott
www.scottymason.com


Re: speaking of Virginian hopper cars...

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Ben,

Not just into the 1970s, but VGN hopper cars were still around into the mid-1980s. I used to hang out around the N&W terminal in Norfolk when I was stationed there in 1982 and 1983. Virginian and NKP happers in original paint were still quite common. Later when I moved to Charlottesville I saw my last VGN hopper in the Southern-C&O interchange around 1985. I'm not sure if many, or any, N&W-absorbed hoppers were relettered. The VGN cars I saw were mostly two-pocket ribbed types (with an occasional three-pocket), all in fairly good condition. The NKP cars were all offset triples, usually disreputable (with "straw doors") and frequently with scratch NKP lettering. I never saw any of these types wearing N&W lettering.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Benjamin Hom wrote:

Tim O'Connor wrote:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130130881193

VGN 1870, from VGN 1000-2499, Class H-14. It's interesting to find a VGN car that had not been renumbered, reclassed, and repainted in N&W, much less surviving in full VGN paint into the 1970s.


Ben Hom



Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: Wartime tank car

Garth G. Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Bruce,

Some must have hung around the U.S., probably only in on-post service. One used to sit on the stub of the old C&O Hot Springs Branch at Covington, Virginia. It was apparently used by the failed Allegheny Central tourist railroad, and was left there when the rest of the equipment went elsewhere after the branch closed. It was in the company of one of those curious arch-roofed Army boxcars and a wooden C&O caboose.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Bruce Smith wrote:

On Jul 3, 2007, at 3:33 PM, timboconnor@... wrote:


This is from a current Ebay auction -- I thought it might be of some
interest here...

http://mysite.verizon.net/~jftavares1/2007-04%20(Apr)/train166.jpg

Tim O'
This is one of the US built, European theater, single compartment tank cars with 2 domes that we have discussed here in the past. There is no evidence of these being used in the US, although they did have to get to the ports of embarkation somehow...

Regards

Bruce F. Smith


Re: Weathering DVD Now Available to Order!

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Not to take anything away from Mike Rose and his incredible talent, I
have to concur with Ben's position on this matter.
The methods that I use for weathering freight cars change greatly
depending on the era of the car. I've observed that along with the
soot issue, paints fail differently, modern cars seem to have far more
rust "burn spots" and that modern cars do not seem to be as well
maintained.
At least thats' the way I see it.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
"Are Mike's techniques "dated" solely because post-steam trains were
cleaner or due to differences in loads carried (less coal?), materials
(better steels), or construction (welding vs rivetting)?"

Simply put, the biggest single weathering agent missing from what Mike
is trying to reproduce is the steam locomotive itself. Steam era
freight cars quickly accumulated a layer of soot which created a
markedly different appearance than that of post-steam freight cars.
Fading paint and rusted roofs tended to be masked or be far less
apparent than the effect seen today.

For a more detailed discussion on this subject, see Richard
Hendrickson's "Vintage Dating Freight Cars with Weathering" from the
December 1995 issue of Railmodel Journal. This article is required
reading for anyone wanting to model steam era freight cars.


Ben Hom


Re: Well Packed Lump Coal

s shaffer
 

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve" <winslow7076@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, July 03, 2007 5:32 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Well Packed Lump Coal


Group;

Found this picture at the West Virginia Historical Photographs
Collection. A C&O twin hopper loaded with lump coal, laid in so
cleanly it almost looks like paving stones. Is this typical loading
for this size of coal, or is it so well placed for the sake of the
photographer?

http://images.lib.wvu.edu/cgi/i/image/getimage-idx?viewid=003502.JPG;
cc=wvcp;entryid=x-003502;view=image

Steve M Stull
Winslow 7076




Yahoo! Groups Links






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3:35 PM


The S-CL Modeler #1

golden1014
 

Gentlemen,

The first issue of The Seaboard-Coast Line Modeler is
now available for at http://www.aclsal.org/ Yes, our
magazine is a complete knock-off of TKM, but we did it
with permission of the TKM guys so that makes it
legal.

There's minimal steam era content this issue, but we
are featuring an article by one each Clark Propst on
kitbashing an SAL AF-4 auto car. I hear it's a pretty
funny read.

If any of gentlemen would care to write something for
us, please contact me at Golden1014@... or at
jgolden@... for details. ACL, SAL,
SCL, Seaboard System (to include former L&N), CSX,
predecessor lines (C&WC, CN&L, AB&C, etc.) are fair
game for articles. We'll even consider articles on
run-through power (like Frisco GP-40s) or pool freight
cars (like FGE) if your daring enough to submit and
make your case. If you don't care to write an article,
send photos of your models and we'll run them in our
"Modeler's Showcase" section. We'll also publish
photos of models that are in progress.

We're publishing quarterly, so the next issue should
be out in early September. In the meantime, we'd
appreciate your thoughtful comments and suggestions so
we can make our magazine better. Thanks for your
time--see you at Naperville!

John


John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

http://www.pbase.com/golden1014


Re: Weathering DVD Now Available to Order!

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Kurt Laughlin wrote:
"Are Mike's techniques "dated" solely because post-steam trains were
cleaner or due to differences in loads carried (less coal?), materials
(better steels), or construction (welding vs rivetting)?"

Simply put, the biggest single weathering agent missing from what Mike
is trying to reproduce is the steam locomotive itself. Steam era
freight cars quickly accumulated a layer of soot which created a
markedly different appearance than that of post-steam freight cars.
Fading paint and rusted roofs tended to be masked or be far less
apparent than the effect seen today.

For a more detailed discussion on this subject, see Richard
Hendrickson's "Vintage Dating Freight Cars with Weathering" from the
December 1995 issue of Railmodel Journal. This article is required
reading for anyone wanting to model steam era freight cars.


Ben Hom


Re: Weathering DVD Now Available to Order!

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: benjaminfrank_hom

Mike's techniques are truly innovative and definitely deserve a place
in you skills toolbox; however, be aware that these techniques are
geared towards modeling post-steam freight cars. There is a definite
difference in the appearance of weathered freight cars before and after
the retirement of the steam locomotive, and you can't blindly apply
these techniques to frieght cars of the steam-to-diesel transistion era
without understanding of the prototype.
----- Original Message -----

Are Mike's techniques "dated" solely because post-steam trains were cleaner or due to differences in loads carried (less coal?), materials (better steels), or construction (welding vs rivetting)?

KL


Re: Weathering DVD Now Available to Order!

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Scott Mason wrote:
"Our latest DVD project, "Weathering Freight Cars, Volume 1" is now
ready to order. Volume 1 features well known weathering artist Mike
Rose. Mike demonstrates his weathering techniques using artists' oils
on a variety of rolling stock."

Mike's techniques are truly innovative and definitely deserve a place
in you skills toolbox; however, be aware that these techniques are
geared towards modeling post-steam freight cars. There is a definite
difference in the appearance of weathered freight cars before and after
the retirement of the steam locomotive, and you can't blindly apply
these techniques to frieght cars of the steam-to-diesel transistion era
without understanding of the prototype.


Ben Hom


Re: Well Packed Lump Coal

Tim O'Connor
 

With Eudora on either platform, you can edit any message. So I
correct the URL in the message, save it, and then click. If the
URL is a transient picture (like from Ebay) I copy the picture
(^A^C) and paste it (^V) into the message if I want to remember
it... voila! child's play :-)

Tim

At 7/4/2007 05:42 PM Wednesday, you wrote:
I do not know how your PCs work with e mail and URLs, But on My MAC
when I get an email with a busted URL I hit reply and when that comes
up I change the address from who ever to myself.
I then go to the URL and delete the space between the two parts. This
makes it one. I send the email. When it comes back to me I click on
the URL and it opens Safari and goes to the web page.
WOW Macs with OSX.4 Tiger are good.
Thank you
Larry Jackman


Re: Well Packed Lump Coal

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Larry Jackman wrote:
WOW Macs with OSX.4 Tiger are good.
In the broad (if occasionally OT) spirit of the Fourth, I'd say you sure got that right, Larry!!

Tony Thompson
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937;
e-mail: thompsonmarytony@...


Re: Well Packed Lump Coal

Ljack70117@...
 

I do not know how your PCs work with e mail and URLs, But on My MAC when I get an email with a busted URL I hit reply and when that comes up I change the address from who ever to myself.
I then go to the URL and delete the space between the two parts. This makes it one. I send the email. When it comes back to me I click on the URL and it opens Safari and goes to the web page.
WOW Macs with OSX.4 Tiger are good.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...
I was born with nothing and
I have most of it left

On Jul 4, 2007, at 2:51 PM, toddsyr wrote:

I had a similar if not the same problem. It's fairly common with links in the mailing lists also. For me anyhow. You see the posted link, but only part of it looks like a link ( blue print ). The rest of the link doesn't look like part of it ( black print ). When you try and copy and paste the entire link, only the part in blue appears after you paste. That's ok though, just minimize the page you pasted to before hitting ENTER. I then copy and paste ONLY the missing part ( black print ) and add it to the URL in the page I minimized, thus getting the whole web address I'm trying to link to. THEN you hit ENTER to access the desired link.

Todd K. Stearns

( Still getting my 2 Grand worth out of a PC I bought in 1999 )

----- Original Message -----
From: al_brown03
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2007 7:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Well Packed Lump Coal


I tried to copy the URL from the original message into my browser; it
wouldn't all copy, so I had to type in the rest. *Then* I got to see
this amazing coal load (almost looks like the car has a beehive oven
sitting in it).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Jared Harper" <harper-brown@...> wrote:

I can't bring up the image. All I get is error messages.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA




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http://www.eset.com






Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: Well Packed Lump Coal

toddsyr <toddsyr@...>
 

I had a similar if not the same problem. It's fairly common with links in the mailing lists also. For me anyhow. You see the posted link, but only part of it looks like a link ( blue print ). The rest of the link doesn't look like part of it ( black print ). When you try and copy and paste the entire link, only the part in blue appears after you paste. That's ok though, just minimize the page you pasted to before hitting ENTER. I then copy and paste ONLY the missing part ( black print ) and add it to the URL in the page I minimized, thus getting the whole web address I'm trying to link to. THEN you hit ENTER to access the desired link.

Todd K. Stearns

( Still getting my 2 Grand worth out of a PC I bought in 1999 )

----- Original Message -----
From: al_brown03
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wednesday, July 04, 2007 7:15 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Well Packed Lump Coal


I tried to copy the URL from the original message into my browser; it
wouldn't all copy, so I had to type in the rest. *Then* I got to see
this amazing coal load (almost looks like the car has a beehive oven
sitting in it).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Jared Harper" <harper-brown@...> wrote:
>
> I can't bring up the image. All I get is error messages.
> Jared Harper
> Athens, GA
>





__________ NOD32 2374 (20070703) Information __________

This message was checked by NOD32 antivirus system.
http://www.eset.com


Re: Well Packed Lump Coal

tbarney2004
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Jared Harper" <harper-brown@...> wrote:

I can't bring up the image. All I get is error messages.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA
it's a multi line URL...the ; is NOT the end of it...copy and paste
the line after that which is the rest of the line...yahoo truncated it
due to the punctuation mark in the URL and the excessive line length
Tim Barney


Re: speaking of Virginian hopper cars...

Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...>
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=130130881193

VGN 1870, from VGN 1000-2499, Class H-14. It's interesting to find a VGN car that had not been renumbered, reclassed, and repainted in N&W, much less surviving in full VGN paint into the 1970s.


Ben Hom


speaking of Virginian hopper cars...

Tim O'Connor
 


Re: Well Packed Lump Coal

al_brown03
 

I tried to copy the URL from the original message into my browser; it
wouldn't all copy, so I had to type in the rest. *Then* I got to see
this amazing coal load (almost looks like the car has a beehive oven
sitting in it).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., "Jared Harper" <harper-brown@...> wrote:

I can't bring up the image. All I get is error messages.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA


Re: Well Packed Lump Coal

Jared Harper <harper-brown@...>
 

I can't bring up the image. All I get is error messages.
Jared Harper
Athens, GA