Date   

Re: Frieght cars on the Indiana Hist Society site

cj riley <cjriley42@...>
 

Hey Eric,

All the links lead to the same airplane photo.

CJ Riley


--- Eric Hansmann <ehansmann@...> wrote:

Wow. Thanks to the person who sent the link for the Indiana Historical
Society Digital Image Collection. I found several steam era images.

The door end of a PRR X24 501439
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2281&REC=1

Parial roof shot if the same car
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2280&REC=20

A side view of the same car coupled to a hopper.
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2282&REC=16

End view of the hopper - CTH&SE 370758
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2279&REC=4

Big Four USRA hopper S-81851
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=1160&REC=1

Elevated view of the brake end of the same car
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2301&REC=1

MRS 2294 sporting a checked paint scheme
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2094&REC=6

PRR gons full of coal (a Christmas wish for Eldon?)
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=1238&REC=6

More gondolas at a factory construction site
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=987&REC=14

Big Four gons being loaded with coal - neg is backwards
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2232&REC=19

Close up of a coal gon with peaked end
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2252&REC=20

CCC&StL 19591 - gondola full of coal
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2253&REC=1

More Big Four gons of coal - note different coal sizes
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2229&REC=2

Well, that's a good start for you. I found these by searching for railroad
cars in the search box on those pages. There are many more. Enjoy!



Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.



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Double Board Roofs

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

A few days ago their was a discussion about metal and double board
roofs. Here is the process for applying these roofs per the 1922
CM&StP Ry. Car Department Handbook.

Richard Wilkens

ROOFS
In order to obtain uniformity the following will be observed in the
handling of roofs of system cars.

On all freight cars held for repairs the roofs must be inspected and
placed in good condition.

If roofs are of the inside metal type, and boards are loose, all
loose nails must be drawn and boards renailed with two nails,
staggered in each board at each side plate, purline and ridge pole.
In renailing care must be taken to use proper sized nails, so that
the metal roofing will not be punctured, correct size being
2 1/4," No.2 barbed wire. If the boards require renewal, tongue and
groove boards 5 1/4" wide should be used.

If the inside metal sheets must be renewed, replace with a standard
double board plastic roof, including facia and ridge pole. Any metal
sheets thus reclaimed will be used in repairs to other metal roofs,
flashing, etc.

All nail holes left open after renailing are to be carefully and
properly filled with "Baco," "Sarco," solder, or other suitable
ingredient to prevent leakage.

If roof is of the outside metal type, and only part of metal sheets,
are in need or replacement, these sheets are to be renewed in kind.

If practically all of the metal sheets require renewing, standard
double board plastic roof should be applied, reclaiming usable metal
sheets for piecing out other metal roofs. If the lower course can be
patched out cheaply, this should be done. The roof to be cleaned off
properly and freed from all protruding nails, etc., after which the
plastic roofing paper should be laid down and a course of 5 1/4"
tongue and groove boards applied and allowed to project 1 1/4"
beyond the edge or the facia.

If, however, the lower course of boards cannot be repaired, they
should be removed and a standard double board plastic roof applied.

In the application of the double board plastic roof the carlines
should be properly notched to allow the ridge pole and purlines to
recess into same to such an extent that the top faces will be flush.
Carlines to be secured to side plates with 3/8" x 4" lag screws.

Purlines secured to carline with two 3" No.7 barb wire nails at each
carline.

Ridge pole secured to carlines with l/2" bolts at each carline with
washer and lock nut inside, and these nuts to be gone over and
tightened each time car is on repair track. Where suitable means are
not available for holding the nuts in place, either through lacking
of material or nature of repairs, cut the threads of bolts with
chisel to prevent nuts coming off.

The boards to be used are the standard 5 1/4" tongue and groove, the
lower course nailed with 2" No.8 nails, two at ridge pole, two at
each purline, and two in every other board at side plate and facia,
one nail being used in alternate boards.

Paper to be laid l/2" from edge of roof and to lap over center at
least 6",tacking in place along edges with just sufficient nails to
hold. 1f paper is not long enough to lap 6" at center, same to be
brought up to center and a 12" strip of paper used to cover the
joint, lapping 6" each side of center.

Upper course boards standard 5 1/4" tongue and groove, nailed with
3" No. 7 nails, two at ridge pole, two at side plate, and two at
facia. Two 2 1/2" No. 8 nails used at each purline.

Outside of roof at center to be covered with 1 X tin or other
suitable metal at least 8" wide and nailed with 1" tinners nails
spaced about 4" apart.

Running board saddles to be secured with 1/2" bolts on metal roofs
and with four 3 1/2" No. 16 wood screws on wood roofs. Running
boards secured to saddles with 2 1/2" No. 16 wood screws, three to
each outside board and two at center boards.

Facia 1 3/4" x 5" secured with 4" No. 6 spikes, staggered and spaced
about 12" apart.

Tie rods 5/8" diameter, eight per car, located 5 1/2" above bottom
of carline, and to run through facia using washer and lock nut
outside, and each time car arrives on repair track these nuts to be
gone over and tightened.

The projection of roof over facia must be 1 1/4" it having been
noticed that where a greater projection is used that same has
exceeded the clearance and interfered with doorways and overhead
structures at industrial plants.

Lower course to be given one coat of standard roofing paint, upper
course to be given two coats on top, but none underneath.

"Baco" or "Sarco" should be used on top of boards under outside
metal roofs; to fill up holes or cracks after renailing inside metal
and lower course of double board plastic roofs, to fill up shrinkage
cracks or warping of top course of double board roofs, and around
ridge pole bolts on all roofs.

Different methods have been resorted to in bracing roofs and in
order that some uniformity be established the type of bracing as
shown on print No. 20526-C should be used as far as possible.

It was formerly the practice to use an angle to support and tie the
ridge pole to end plate, but in case of end working out this usually
destroyed ridge pole, and in place of this angle a sheathing strip
should be used as per print No. D-442.

Safety Appliance Law requires that "the ends of running board shall
be not less than 6" or more than 10" from a vertical place parallel
with end of car and passing through inside face of knuckle when
closed with coupler horn against buffer block or end sill, and if
more than 4" from edge of roof of car shall be securely supported
their full width by substantial metal braces." The need for a metal
brace is decided by the length of projection beyond the last running
board saddle, and not by the distance running board extends beyond
the end of car. It will therefore be our practice to keep the roof
saddles nearest end of cars as far out as possible, thus shortening
the leverage and reducing the risk of end of running board breaking.


Help Needed From the Hopper Wizards-- What Were the Original Hopper Cars rebuilt in 1929 for Great Northern's 73000-73099?

gary laakso
 

Canton Car Company re-built the 100 hopper cars that became the Great Northern 73000 to 73099 class. The cars were 33'-9" over the pulling faces with an interior length of 29"-10" and a height of 10"-6 3/4". While the cars on the GN had 4 side posts, a diagram that Staffan Ehnbom located shows the units with 9, so that may have been the car's shape prior to the 1929 rebuild. GN, of course, purchased the cars from J.H.Grace of Chicago. I always thought that the 4 post look was odd, and a rebuild would explain why the cars don't seem to match other designs. Any ideas whose cars were re-built for the GN?

On a Xmas note, just so you all know how long Al Westerfield's family has been working in resin reproductions, the latest issue of Archaeology magazine shows lion models from 1340 AD, and i could swear that i can make out a carved "AW" on the lion!

gary laakso
south of Mike Brock
vasa0vasa@...
EarthLink Revolves Around You.


Re: CM&StP Ry. Icing Instructions

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

----- Original Message -----
From: railsnw1

. . . Packing house products (butter, eggs, or cheese) . . .

----- Original Message -----

Huh. I would've thought packing house products were things like sausage, hams, and cured meats and these things were dairy products.

KL


CM&StP Ry. Icing Instructions

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

Hello All, the following is from the 1922 Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul Railway Car Department Handbook and relates to the icing of
refrigerator cars.

Enjoy,

Richard Wilkens

ICING OF CARS CONTAINING MEATS, PACKING HOUSE PRODUCTS' ETC.

These rules must be closely observed in order to prevent heavy
claims being presented for spoiled shipments. Straight or mixed cars
of fresh and frozen meat or dressed poultry, use crushed ice with
salt. Packing house products (butter, eggs, or cheese), must be re-
iced with crushed, block or lump ice, with or without salt in
accordance with railroad billing.

Ice must be thoroughly cleaned by flushing with water, thus removing
all foreign substances to prevent clogging of drains. Crushed Ice
should be no larger than a man's fist. Lump Ice should be broken
into chunks of about 15 or 20 pounds weight. Block Ice will consist
of chunks weighing approximately 50 pounds, which will be permitted
to fall into tanks loosely. No.2 Rock Salt will be used when salt is
specified.

Extreme care must be used in the removal of hatch covers and plugs
to prevent foreign substances from dropping into tanks. Uncover only
such tanks as can immediately be filled, to prevent any unnecessary
exposure. Plugs and covers are to be rep1aced at once after re-icing
is completed. Plugs to be fitted evenly and tight in the tanks by
tamping lightly with tamping pole.

If tank valves do not work, excess water must be removed from tanks
before re-icing is attempted. This can be accomplished by using a
handpump or bailing out with buckets. Where valves do not work, next
icing station must be notified by wire so they can be prepared to
promptly remove excess brine before re-icing.

A. R. A. Rule 3 requires all beef refrigerator cars to be equipped
with brine retaining valves to prevent brine dripping along right of
way between icing stations. When plugs are pulled, excess brine is
automatically released. Considering the large number of cars now
equipped with this device, and above rule requiring all such cars to
be equipped as fast as possible, it is necessary that each icing
station possesses a hand-pump, as excess brine must be removed
before re-icing is attempted.

Crushed ice with salt: see that a wooden tamping pole is used. Under
no circumstances permit pike poles or poles with metal ends to be
used. Tamping pole should be inserted into the old ice-thoroughly
stirred and tamped to settle to bottom of tanks. After tamping, one-
third of the salt required in the re-icing is to be properly spread
over the old ice before any new ice is used. Then fill tanks
completely with ice and put the balance of the salt, evenly spread,
on top. Again use tamping pole vigorously to even off the top of the
ice and start salt working. See that space between running boards is
filled, but do not fill tank above top of saddles.

If station is not equipped with an ice crusher, use wooden mauls and
ice crushing boxes to insure efficient re-icing. Under no
circumstances permit ice to be broken on roofs or in tanks of cars.


Re: CM&STP Ry. Stock Trains

ljack70117@...
 

FYI The 36 hours talked about applies only when the shipper has
signed a release. Other wise it is only 28 hours. Also 36 hours on
the car required 10 hours off.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
Boca Raton FL
ljack70117@...

On Dec 25, 2006, at 2:57 PM, railsnw1 wrote:

Hello all and Happy Holidays. While looking through some of my
carmens handbooks I came across something interesting on stock
trains. The following is from the "C.M.&St.P.R'y. Co. Car Department
Handbook" published by the Chicago, Milwaukke & St. Paul Railway on
October 11, 1922. While primarily aimed at the car department it
gives some good info on stock train movements. one interesting thing
I noticed was that steel framed stock cars were not desired as they
had a tendancy to derail especially on branch lines? Was the track
in 1922 already in that bad of shape?

Enjoy,

Richard Wilkens

STOCK TRAINS

Certain sections of the railroad depend very materially, or in a
large part, on our ability to attract stockmen to ship over our
lines. Very certain and difficult competition has to be met. Besides
this, one of the greatest opportunities offered for damage claims is
accounted for from delay in getting stock to market on time,
resulting in changing prices offered for stock at the primary
markets, also delays mean extra feeds which burden the shipper with
unwarranted expense. Defective equipment placed for loading should
always be avoided as there is plenty of time to fix stock cars
properly during the idle season and at feeding stations, where they
must necessarily lay five hours at least. This is a branch of the
trade where we must deliver service every minute as the shipper has
his representative on board to check us up.

Stock originating west of Highwood on the Northern Montana and west
of Three Forks on the main line, is moved to Miles City for feeding,
this in view of it being impossible to bring stock from these points
into Marmarth without violating the 36-hour law. This stock then
moves through Mobridge, Montevideo, Farmington, River division, La
Crosse division and C. & M. division, having a feed again at
Montevideo.

Stock originating on the S. M. division and branches moves over the
La Crosse division and the C. & M. division.

Stock originating on the I. & D. division moves over that division,
Dubuque division and Illinois division.

Stock from points on the S. C. D. division, K. C. division and Iowa
division, moves over these divisions and the Illinois division into
Chicago.

Stock for movement from Texas for points on Western Lines is moved
over the S. C. & D. division to Mobridge and then to destination,
and it has been arranged that this stock, which comes to us in very
weakened condition, is to be unloaded, rested, fed and inspected at
Sioux City before being routed over our line in system cars. Foreign
cars, as a general practice will be returned to delivering line, so
that it is not only necessary to have a sufficient supply of fit
cars at Sioux City during such periods, but also to see that the
shipments are handled with dispatch and care. Steel under frame and
metal framed stock cars of foreign ownership are not desirable, due
to their tendency to derail, for movement on our branch lines,
especially out of Mobridge.

The Federal Law prohibits the movement of stock when such movement
exceeds 36 hours, unless stock is unloaded for rest and feeding. It
is there¬fore, of the utmost importance, that stock cars be given
the best attention at originating stations and at feeding stations,
so that the trains will be able to make their next stop without
being delayed on account of defective equipment. The minimum Layover
at feeding stations is five (5) hours.

Movement of stock trains are checked by government representatives,
and in cases where the 36-hour law is violated, suits are brought
against the road.

In explaining the primary movements, it is to be stated, that the
principal packing houses an the railroad are located at Seattle,
Spokane, Aberdeen, So. St. Paul, Milwaukee, Sioux City, Austin,
Cedar Rapids, Ottumwa, Omaha, Kansas City and Chicago, so that
primary movements will find their way to these stations, and local
car foremen are well acquainted with the necessities of the case and
must not only take into account movements which come to them from
their neighboring foremen, but should take sufficient interest to
see that when our cars are returned that they go into the loading
territories in good order, and in this sense they can control their
bad order situation and difficulties of movement through their
territory to a very great extent.

It is meant in this that foreman must not complain about their
neighbors when they themselves had the same empty stock cars passing
through their stations prior to being loaded, but failed to fix them
with the result they again had them on their hands under revenue
load in defective condition, necessitating delay to trains and often
transfer of / shipments. Further emphasis is necessary to point out
that shippers are unwilling to delay their stock and to go to the
additional expense of extra feeds, which can be overcome if we put
these trains in shape in the five hours allowed us during the rest
period. This must be done on repair tracks at feeding stations,
which are primarily responsible for the 36-hour movement of trains
between feeding stations and to consuming markets.





Yahoo! Groups Links



CM&STP Ry. Stock Trains

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

Hello all and Happy Holidays. While looking through some of my
carmens handbooks I came across something interesting on stock
trains. The following is from the "C.M.&St.P.R'y. Co. Car Department
Handbook" published by the Chicago, Milwaukke & St. Paul Railway on
October 11, 1922. While primarily aimed at the car department it
gives some good info on stock train movements. one interesting thing
I noticed was that steel framed stock cars were not desired as they
had a tendancy to derail especially on branch lines? Was the track
in 1922 already in that bad of shape?

Enjoy,

Richard Wilkens

STOCK TRAINS

Certain sections of the railroad depend very materially, or in a
large part, on our ability to attract stockmen to ship over our
lines. Very certain and difficult competition has to be met. Besides
this, one of the greatest opportunities offered for damage claims is
accounted for from delay in getting stock to market on time,
resulting in changing prices offered for stock at the primary
markets, also delays mean extra feeds which burden the shipper with
unwarranted expense. Defective equipment placed for loading should
always be avoided as there is plenty of time to fix stock cars
properly during the idle season and at feeding stations, where they
must necessarily lay five hours at least. This is a branch of the
trade where we must deliver service every minute as the shipper has
his representative on board to check us up.

Stock originating west of Highwood on the Northern Montana and west
of Three Forks on the main line, is moved to Miles City for feeding,
this in view of it being impossible to bring stock from these points
into Marmarth without violating the 36-hour law. This stock then
moves through Mobridge, Montevideo, Farmington, River division, La
Crosse division and C. & M. division, having a feed again at
Montevideo.

Stock originating on the S. M. division and branches moves over the
La Crosse division and the C. & M. division.

Stock originating on the I. & D. division moves over that division,
Dubuque division and Illinois division.

Stock from points on the S. C. D. division, K. C. division and Iowa
division, moves over these divisions and the Illinois division into
Chicago.

Stock for movement from Texas for points on Western Lines is moved
over the S. C. & D. division to Mobridge and then to destination,
and it has been arranged that this stock, which comes to us in very
weakened condition, is to be unloaded, rested, fed and inspected at
Sioux City before being routed over our line in system cars. Foreign
cars, as a general practice will be returned to delivering line, so
that it is not only necessary to have a sufficient supply of fit
cars at Sioux City during such periods, but also to see that the
shipments are handled with dispatch and care. Steel under frame and
metal framed stock cars of foreign ownership are not desirable, due
to their tendency to derail, for movement on our branch lines,
especially out of Mobridge.

The Federal Law prohibits the movement of stock when such movement
exceeds 36 hours, unless stock is unloaded for rest and feeding. It
is there¬fore, of the utmost importance, that stock cars be given
the best attention at originating stations and at feeding stations,
so that the trains will be able to make their next stop without
being delayed on account of defective equipment. The minimum Layover
at feeding stations is five (5) hours.

Movement of stock trains are checked by government representatives,
and in cases where the 36-hour law is violated, suits are brought
against the road.

In explaining the primary movements, it is to be stated, that the
principal packing houses an the railroad are located at Seattle,
Spokane, Aberdeen, So. St. Paul, Milwaukee, Sioux City, Austin,
Cedar Rapids, Ottumwa, Omaha, Kansas City and Chicago, so that
primary movements will find their way to these stations, and local
car foremen are well acquainted with the necessities of the case and
must not only take into account movements which come to them from
their neighboring foremen, but should take sufficient interest to
see that when our cars are returned that they go into the loading
territories in good order, and in this sense they can control their
bad order situation and difficulties of movement through their
territory to a very great extent.

It is meant in this that foreman must not complain about their
neighbors when they themselves had the same empty stock cars passing
through their stations prior to being loaded, but failed to fix them
with the result they again had them on their hands under revenue
load in defective condition, necessitating delay to trains and often
transfer of / shipments. Further emphasis is necessary to point out
that shippers are unwilling to delay their stock and to go to the
additional expense of extra feeds, which can be overcome if we put
these trains in shape in the five hours allowed us during the rest
period. This must be done on repair tracks at feeding stations,
which are primarily responsible for the 36-hour movement of trains
between feeding stations and to consuming markets.


Re: TMW archbar trucks

eabracher@...
 

In a message dated 12/25/06 3:54:08 PM, b.leppert@... writes:



Next project will probably be caboose trucks-
Brian, how close are they to the NCB caboose at Carson City Museum?

eric


Re: Christmas

rfederle@...
 

Mail Train emergency stop!! What happened? Broken air hose, Hot Box, Track fouled. Stopped for dinner. Make sure a detailed report is filed.

Merry Christmas

Robert Federle
---- mrcustom@... wrote:

This message should be delivered yesterday
but mail train made an emergency stop
and the engineer couldn`t move the train again.


Still in time

MERRY CHRISTMAS to all list members

Marcelo Lordeiro
President/Owner
MR Custom Service
www.mrcustom.com.br



Re: Christmas

Roger Parry <uncleroger@...>
 

Same to you!
On Dec 25, 2006, at 8:05 AM, mrcustom@... wrote:

This message should be delivered yesterday
but mail train made an emergency stop
and the engineer couldn`t move the train again.

Still in time

MERRY CHRISTMAS to all list members

Marcelo Lordeiro
President/Owner
MR Custom Service
www.mrcustom.com.br


Roger Parry
uncleroger@...


Re: Practical use for model box cars

Jim Peters <box_car_pete@...>
 

Merry Christmas Clark,

Your Canadian cars:
- CN 475916 was built by the National Steel Car Co of Hamilton, Ontario about 1937 (I will verify the date when I'm home later in the week). This is one of the earlier AAR style cars built for the CN - the style of end is referred to by Canadian modellers as NSC-1. Interesting car, the roof and ends make it quite different from most of its type built in the US - but for a proto-type modeller I found the most interesting and challenging is the piping arrangement resulting from the location of the brake gear, all 3 major components are on the same side of the car.
- CN 414593 is a Fowler car (a previous discussion on this group) built between 1917 and 1923 for one of the predecessores of the Canadian National. By the 1950's these were used primarily for grain shipments within Canada - with close to 3200 still listed in revenue service in April 1959.
- CP 236378 these were built in 1920/21 as grain cars and originally had hopper doors centred on the underside of the car directly under the side doors. With Canada declaring war on Germany along with the rest of the Commonwealth in Sept 1939 the railways could no longer afford dedicated cars, thus by mid 1940 the hopper doors were removed and the cars converted to general service. The Tichy kit produces an excellent model of the post-war version with one standout feature missing - and this is easy to correct with a few pieces of Evergreen Styrene and Grandt Line 1-1/2" NBW sets (again once home I will get you the proper dimensions if you're interested).

For operations on your layout "DO NOT RELOAD THE CARS - THEY MUST RETURN HOME EMPTY". The cars were not built in the United States and as such can not be used in revenue service in the US. They may not legally be reloaded in the for any reason.

I wish you and everyone else on this group the very best the holiday season can bring and a very prosperous 2007.

Jim Peters
Coquitlam, BC

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...> wrote:
ROAD NAME NUMBER CAR TYPE LOAD TO Manufr
CN 475916 Box Paper Incline IM/Sylvan
CN 414593 Box Lumber Builders/MC L Westfld
CP 236378 Box Lumber Builders/MC L Tichy

To put all these recent information to practical use I currently have
three Canadian box cars out of a fleet of over 100 box cars. The
first model is numbered for an actual car that was on the RR with a
load of paper. It is an Intermountain car with a Sylvan flat panel
roof and the ends that are similar to those on a PS1, but with
vertical strap like protrusions. The second model (Westerfield) 36'
SS, I most have picked up at a swap meet because I have no info on
that number series, so I gave the car a load of lumber. The last car
(Tichy) single sheath is also numbered for a car that was on the RR
with the correct load.

I have two lumber yards I can spot the cars of lumber at to unload
and a ramp to unload the paper. Big question: Then what? Do I reload
them with cement, feed, fertilizer, or grain and send them back
north? If so, do I weigh them? The cement, feed, fertilizer are all
bagged, I know they didn't weigh the bagged cement, how `bout the
grain? Probably not. Or, do I send them north empty?

Thanks to all who answer,
Clark Propst
MC IA





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Re: Gondola Car With Hoppers?

Jack Mullen
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Tony's beat me to the answer, and he's right on the mark. The ERIE
had quite a few of these. Can
anyone make out a number?

SGL
Looks to me like 52084. The numerals are a bit fuzzy but that should be
in the right series anyway.

52000-52999 Gondola steel, hop. bot. IL 40' IW 9'5 5/8 IH 4'2 CuFt 1706
Capy 100000. 992 in series as of 10/1919 ORER. (Thanks, Santa!)

Jack Mullen


Frieght cars on the Indiana Hist Society site

Eric Hansmann <ehansmann@...>
 

Wow. Thanks to the person who sent the link for the Indiana Historical
Society Digital Image Collection. I found several steam era images.

The door end of a PRR X24 501439
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2281&REC=1

Parial roof shot if the same car
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2280&REC=20

A side view of the same car coupled to a hopper.
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2282&REC=16

End view of the hopper - CTH&SE 370758
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2279&REC=4

Big Four USRA hopper S-81851
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=1160&REC=1

Elevated view of the brake end of the same car
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2301&REC=1

MRS 2294 sporting a checked paint scheme
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2094&REC=6

PRR gons full of coal (a Christmas wish for Eldon?)
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=1238&REC=6

More gondolas at a factory construction site
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=987&REC=14

Big Four gons being loaded with coal - neg is backwards
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2232&REC=19

Close up of a coal gon with peaked end
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2252&REC=20

CCC&StL 19591 - gondola full of coal
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2253&REC=1

More Big Four gons of coal - note different coal sizes
http://images.indianahistory.org/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/P0129&CISOPT
R=2229&REC=2

Well, that's a good start for you. I found these by searching for railroad
cars in the search box on those pages. There are many more. Enjoy!



Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.


Re: WIF box car

Ed Hawkins
 

On Dec 23, 2006, at 3:07 AM, Thomas M. Olsen wrote:

Branchline sells the PS-0 ends separately as well as the flat panel
roofs if none other are available. Thanks for reminding me as I forgot
to look at the photo when I wrote the earlier note a number of hours
ago. I built my two cars almost 10 years ago and forgot about the 12
panel sides.

Tom,
Branchline Trains offers the correct "carbuilder's ends" used on the
WIF 200-349 box cars built by AC&F in 1952. These are essentially R+3/4
Improved Dreadnaught Ends, less all but one of the thinner intermediate
corrugations. The roofs used on these cars is called the "ACF Riveted
Roof" and was a proprietary design used only by AC&F during the late
1940s to 1954 on a number of series of box cars. To date this roof is
not available in HO scale (or any other scale that I know of) and would
be a very difficult pattern to either scratch-build or modify from an
existing roof.

A depiction of this unusual roof can be seen on page 80 of the 1953 Car
Builders' Cyclopedia (also page 82 of the 1949-1951 CBC). In addition
to the WIF 200-349 series cars, this roof was also used on cars built
for ACL, BAR, C&EI, CN&L, CRR, ITC, KCS, MKT, RDG, and RI from 1948
through 1954. Some of these cars had 12-panel welded sides, others were
10-panel riveted. Door sizes vary from 6' wide to 8' wide. Many of
these cars had the version of the end that is discussed in my article
in Oct. 1990 Railmodel Journal. Reading and MKT cars used AC&F
proprietary ends that are also shown and discussed in the 1949-51 and
1953 CBC.

Branchline Trains has designed the tooling program for this roof based
on AC&F drawings (I've seen 3-dimensional views from the graphics).
Branchline Trains has also designed 12-panel riveted and 12-panel
welded sides for their existing line of 40' box cars. However, to date
little (if any) tooling has been cut. Perhaps Bill Schneider may want
to provide an update on when this tooling might become available.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Christmas

mrcustom@...
 

This message should be delivered yesterday
but mail train made an emergency stop
and the engineer couldn`t move the train again.


Still in time

MERRY CHRISTMAS to all list members

Marcelo Lordeiro
President/Owner
MR Custom Service
www.mrcustom.com.br


Amarillo Railroad Museum New Cars on e-Bay

asychis@...
 

Hi Guys,

For those who are interested, our next run of ART steel reefers, correctly
painted this time and with no numbers (but decals with numbers and reweigh
dates/locations) are now in and posted on e-Bay.

Also, brand new, a run of Red Caboose RTR PRR X29 boxcars with patch panels
in the REA scheme. Twelve numbers. Also on e-Bay.

Finally, we're offering free shipping on our PFE R40-25s 1949 scheme reefers
and Kadee SP PS-2 covered hoppers until 12/31/06. Again, also on e-Bay.

Jerry Michels
Amarillo Railroad Museum


NEW HO Archbar trucks & wheelsets

Andy Carlson
 

New from Tahoe Model Works, the company that brought out the Dalman 2-level trucks, a 40 ton Archbar truck. This truck is no less spectacular than the Dalmans, and if there is a need for archbars in your stable, check this out. This truck is available from me in either semi-scale or Fat width wheelsets.

Tahoe Model Works

Archbar trucks with semi-scale wheelsets......$5.00/pair
Archbar trucks with code 110 (Fat) wheelsets $5.00/pair
Dalman Lateral Motion w/ semi-scale wheels $5.00/pair
Same, with code 110 (Fat) wheelsets $5.00/pair
Dalman plain 2 level w/ semi-scale wheelsets $5.00/pair
Same, with code 110 (Fat) wheelsets $5.00/pair

Branchline Trains

Barber S-2 plain journal trucks, less wheels $1.00/pair
Branchline 36" semi-scale wheelsets (12 axles) $5.00/set
Intermountain Semi-scale wheelsets (12 axles) $6.50 package
BL 8 rung ladder sets for 10-6 car..................$1.00/set

Contact me off-list if interested <midcentury@...>
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: Gondola Car With Hoppers?- Thanks

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

I want to thank everyone who responded on my question. I appreciate
the opportunity to learn about such things from the other members of
this group.

Bob Chaparro
Mission Viejo/Hemet, CA


Re: ADMIN: Public Service Announcement

Greg Bartek
 

SIR, YES SIR!!!

Pvt. Greg Bartek

--- In STMFC@..., "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

Given that I am the head judge and bottle washer of this rather
august
group, every now and then I have the duty...nay, priviledge...of
wandering
off our ordained subject matter to express a point or make a
public service
announcement. It seems appropriate now to do so and therefore...to
borrow
from the old comic strip Bettle Baily [ Baily was a private in the
US
Army ], and to copy exactly from a refrain by his sergeant...

You WILL have a Merry Christmas.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


ADMIN: Public Service Announcement

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Given that I am the head judge and bottle washer of this rather august group, every now and then I have the duty...nay, priviledge...of wandering off our ordained subject matter to express a point or make a public service announcement. It seems appropriate now to do so and therefore...to borrow from the old comic strip Bettle Baily [ Baily was a private in the US Army ], and to copy exactly from a refrain by his sergeant...

You WILL have a Merry Christmas.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner

138081 - 138100 of 196865