Date   

Re: Weigh a minute

Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

Also, there is McMaster-Carr. If you can¹t find it there, you don¹t need it.

http://www.mcmaster.com/
--

Brian Ehni



From: rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@...>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 14:28:12 -0000
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Weigh a minute





Modelers complain about the lack of interior detail in open cars.
Kadee did interior detail in their new twin hopper and modelers
complain about the weighs being attached to the removable load.

The instructions for the Speedwitch SOU low sides gon DOL a suggest
using a .030 thick weigh. The model was designed for that thickness of
weigh to be sandwiched between the floor and underframe. The interior
is detailed, but the depth of the underframe was sacrificed by .030 to
make room for the weigh. I don't have a problem with that. My problem
is where is Joe Average modeler suppose to get a .030 weigh and how
would he know how thick it was anyway??
Anyone have a solution?
Clark Propst


Re: Weight a minute

Andy Sperandeo <asperandeo@...>
 

Hi Clark,

A-Line sells lead in 1/32" x 2-3/4" x 4-1/2" sheets ­ it's in the latest
Walthers catalog. My General no. 1521 scale rule tells me that 1/32" =
.0312", which might be close enough to fit in the Speedwitch gondola. (I
haven't built one myself yet.) If that's a little too thick, remember that
lead is usually quite malleable. You can hammer it on a hard surface to thin
it out a little before trimming it to size.

The Walthers catalog also lists inexpensive dial calipers, and they're a
good way to tell if something is .030" thick. Many years ago I bought one of
PFM's vernier calipers, and once I learned to use it I found it practically
indispensable. These days I'm more likely to use a digital caliper that's
easier to read, but I wouldn't want to do without a caliper of some kind.

Good luck with your gon,

Andy


Andy Sperandeo
Executive Editor
Model Railroader magazine
asperandeo@...
262-796-8776, ext. 461
FAX 262-796-1142



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Weigh a minute

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

In many states (read almost everywhere except California), it available
from Home Depot or similar stores. As much as you need is cut from a
long roll and sold by the pound. HD thinks it is a building material
to be used for roof flashing. We know better. $4-5 worth will last
you a long time.

regards,

Andy Miller



________________________________

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On
Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 11:04 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Weigh a minute



Clark;
I have sometimes been able to find 1/32" lead sheet at a hobby
shop. It is
what I have used on all my shallow underframe gons. It was
clearly labeled
as 1/32". I know other folks get lead sheet from industrial
suppliers.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com> ] On
Behalf Of
rockroll50401
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 10:28 AM
To: STMFC@... <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Weigh a minute

Modelers complain about the lack of interior detail in open
cars.
Kadee did interior detail in their new twin hopper and modelers

complain about the weighs being attached to the removable load.

The instructions for the Speedwitch SOU low sides gon DOL a
suggest
using a .030 thick weigh. The model was designed for that
thickness of
weigh to be sandwiched between the floor and underframe. The
interior
is detailed, but the depth of the underframe was sacrificed by
.030 to
make room for the weigh. I don't have a problem with that. My
problem
is where is Joe Average modeler suppose to get a .030 weigh and
how
would he know how thick it was anyway??
Anyone have a solution?
Clark Propst

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Weigh a minute

Frederick Freitas <prrinvt@...>
 

Clark,

A-Line makes flat lead sheet in very thin slices. I've been adding it to open cars for some time. Cuts easy for installation on underframes, slope sheets, or in between the u-frame and the floor, as noted in the post. Nice bit is,it curves to add weight to tank cars, or you can put it inside a gon load.

Fred Freitas

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...> wrote:
Modelers complain about the lack of interior detail in open cars.
Kadee did interior detail in their new twin hopper and modelers
complain about the weighs being attached to the removable load.

The instructions for the Speedwitch SOU low sides gon DOL a suggest
using a .030 thick weigh. The model was designed for that thickness of
weigh to be sandwiched between the floor and underframe. The interior
is detailed, but the depth of the underframe was sacrificed by .030 to
make room for the weigh. I don't have a problem with that. My problem
is where is Joe Average modeler suppose to get a .030 weigh and how
would he know how thick it was anyway??
Anyone have a solution?
Clark Propst






---------------------------------
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Get on board. You're invited to try the new Yahoo! Mail.


Re: Weigh a minute

Gatwood, Elden J SAD <Elden.J.Gatwood@...>
 

Clark;
I have sometimes been able to find 1/32" lead sheet at a hobby shop. It is
what I have used on all my shallow underframe gons. It was clearly labeled
as 1/32". I know other folks get lead sheet from industrial suppliers.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
rockroll50401
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 10:28 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Weigh a minute

Modelers complain about the lack of interior detail in open cars.
Kadee did interior detail in their new twin hopper and modelers
complain about the weighs being attached to the removable load.

The instructions for the Speedwitch SOU low sides gon DOL a suggest
using a .030 thick weigh. The model was designed for that thickness of
weigh to be sandwiched between the floor and underframe. The interior
is detailed, but the depth of the underframe was sacrificed by .030 to
make room for the weigh. I don't have a problem with that. My problem
is where is Joe Average modeler suppose to get a .030 weigh and how
would he know how thick it was anyway??
Anyone have a solution?
Clark Propst








Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: Weigh a minute

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Clark,

How about an Athearn freight car weight? Might be a little light, but better than nothing. I don't know how thick these things are; maybe around .020?

Can you still get Athearn parts without buying a whole assembled car? They used to be available in four-packs through Walthers and other wholesalers.

There's also sheet lead, or even lead shot. And how about drapery weights?

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

rockroll50401 wrote:

Modelers complain about the lack of interior detail in open cars. Kadee did interior detail in their new twin hopper and modelers complain about the weighs being attached to the removable load.

The instructions for the Speedwitch SOU low sides gon DOL a suggest using a .030 thick weigh. The model was designed for that thickness of weigh to be sandwiched between the floor and underframe. The interior is detailed, but the depth of the underframe was sacrificed by .030 to make room for the weigh. I don't have a problem with that. My problem is where is Joe Average modeler suppose to get a .030 weigh and how would he know how thick it was anyway?? Anyone have a solution?
Clark Propst


Re: Weigh a minute

Brian Paul Ehni <behni@...>
 

Several companies sell lead sheet in varying thicknesses, including A-line:
<http://www.walthers.com/exec/search?category=&scale=&manu=&item=&keywords=l
ead+sheet&instock=Q&split=30&Submit=Search>

The .7mm is close enough to .030² to not matter much.
--

Brian Ehni



From: rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
Reply-To: <STMFC@...>
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2006 14:28:12 -0000
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: [STMFC] Weigh a minute





Modelers complain about the lack of interior detail in open cars.
Kadee did interior detail in their new twin hopper and modelers
complain about the weighs being attached to the removable load.

The instructions for the Speedwitch SOU low sides gon DOL a suggest
using a .030 thick weigh. The model was designed for that thickness of
weigh to be sandwiched between the floor and underframe. The interior
is detailed, but the depth of the underframe was sacrificed by .030 to
make room for the weigh. I don't have a problem with that. My problem
is where is Joe Average modeler suppose to get a .030 weigh and how
would he know how thick it was anyway??
Anyone have a solution?
Clark Propst


Weigh a minute

rockroll50401 <cepropst@...>
 

Modelers complain about the lack of interior detail in open cars.
Kadee did interior detail in their new twin hopper and modelers
complain about the weighs being attached to the removable load.

The instructions for the Speedwitch SOU low sides gon DOL a suggest
using a .030 thick weigh. The model was designed for that thickness of
weigh to be sandwiched between the floor and underframe. The interior
is detailed, but the depth of the underframe was sacrificed by .030 to
make room for the weigh. I don't have a problem with that. My problem
is where is Joe Average modeler suppose to get a .030 weigh and how
would he know how thick it was anyway??
Anyone have a solution?
Clark Propst


Less than 50% (was:Why does data & photographs support ...)

Miller, Andrew S. <asmiller@...>
 

Perhaps the cars were cleaned at a location other than the one at which
they were emptied after each loaded use. I imagine that covered
hoppers carrying edible products would require cleaning after each use.

regards,

Andy Miller



________________________________

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On
Behalf Of david zuhn
Sent: Tuesday, September 26, 2006 10:11 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Why does data & photographs support
wide distribution of boxcars? (Was - New Books)



> What was happening that caused the number to go below 50%?

| Links
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/links;_ylc=X3oDMTJmaG5wMzZiBF9TAzk
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zk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzI1NTQ3NTMEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNjAwMTY5NzI1BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xr
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.

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Re: Why does data & photographs support wide distribution of boxcars? (Was - New Books)

david zuhn
 

What was happening that caused the number to go below 50%?
Perhaps the source of the loads move over time, so you need to
re-route empties differently. Case in point -- oil refineries and
other tank car loading points are not seasonal, while various
argicultural products are, and once the sugar beet harvest is ready
(for example), the RR needs to move as many cars as it takes to the
site of the sugar beets, but then when harvest is complete, those cars
will move elsewhere for a different load.


--
david d zuhn, St Paul Bridge & Terminal Ry., St. Paul, Minn.
http://stpaulterminal.org/


Re: Composite hopper slope sheet material?

James D Thompson <jaydeet@...>
 

Aside from 50 oddball truss side hoppers acquired in 1904 and 1,000
steel twins allocated to the railroad by the USRA, the D&H would not
obtain large numbers of all-steel hoppers untli after WWII.

As for the Southern, they were still buying thousands of 36 ft DS
boxcars with composite underframes (steel center sill and truss
rods) during the early 1920s, so it's not surprising that they were
a big user of composite hoppers into the early 1950s as well (~2,900
cars in 1950).
True so far as it goes, but I think it's oversimplifying things too much.

D&H bought 100 steel gondolas in 1900, then 300 low-side wood-frame gondolas in 1902, the 50 truss-side steel hoppers in 1904, then built 150 Seley-derivative hoppers in 1905-06 after repudiating an order to SSC for 100 cars of that design. This was fairly typical in the period, ordering smallish batches of cars to evaluate the merits of all-steel and steel-frame construction. D&H settled on composite construction, ordering 6,000 Seley-derivative hoppers in 1906-7 and 1,000 steel-frame gondolas in 1907. That flood and rebuilds of the older wood-frame gondolas carried D&H to World War I, when the USRA cars were forced on D&H practically at gunpoint. Rebuilds of the steel-frame fleet carried D&H through the 1920s and '30s.

Southern, on the other hand, adopted steel hoppers and gondolas circa 1906 and continued to order them through to World War I. At that point, the early cars were rebuilt with composite bodies (not at all unusual for the time), but Southern continued with composite construction after the war and ordered new hoppers and gondolas with composite bodies, and box car orders regressed from steel underframes to steel center sills. This went on to circa 1927, when Southern reverted to prewar practice and ordered steel hoppers and steel-frame box cars again.

David Thompson


Re: Weigh a minute

Richard Bale
 

As Andy has already pointed out, A-Line sells lead sheet stock for modelers.
For a complete list of A-Line weighting supplies including specifications
visit
www.ppw-aline.com

Dick Bale
Carlsbad CA


Remainder of Collection for Sale

John Degnan <RailScaler@...>
 

I am again offering ALL of the remaining HO models in my collection as a package deal... this includes ALL track, electronics, scenics and structures as well... for the price of $2,300.00.

Visit http://www.trainweb.org/seaboard/MODEL_COLLECTION.htm to see what's left of the SAL and SCL models, although there may be a very few freight cars of other road names not listed.

This is a first come, first serve offer, and I will accept payments.

I will also sell individual models to anyone interested, but I do NOT have any plans at this time to list ANY of my models on ebay again due to their seemingly ever-increasing prices which only compounds the loss on the models.

In addition, I offer a NO-QUESTIONS-ASKED, 100% MONEY-BACK GUARANTEE that you will receive (a) quality product(s), based on the FACT that ALL of my models (with very few noted exceptions) are BRAND NEW or like NEW, many having NEVER been removed from the box!

Contact me off-line at RailScaler@... if interested.


John Degnan


Re: Red Caboose 42' Flat Cars-Which Roads are Accurate?

Bruce Smith
 

On Mon, September 25, 2006 7:59 pm, Richard Hendrickson wrote:
On Sep 25, 2006, at 11:30 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:

The Red Caboose 42' flat is a USRA (fishbelly sills) 50 ton flat that
is a New York Central prototype. Similar cars, but with minor changes
are good for C&O, C&NW, B&M, FEC, PM, DT&I, TC, GN, W&LE.
No, no, Bruce, the RC flat does NOT represent the USRA flat car design.
The USRA design, though not produced for the USRA during WE I, was
built (sometimes with very minor modifications) for a number of RRs in
the 1920s, including several of those you mention above (as well as
others, e.g. DSS&A).
Richard,
Sorry - its been too long since I read your RMJ article <G>

More importantly, I still need NYC decals for mine (I purchased a PRR car
before I was knew it was bogus), although if W&LE decals were available,
that would be very tempting indeed!

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Red vs. BCR ends on red Swift wood reefers

Jerry <jrs060@...>
 

This is incorrect, Mr. Brock's reply of today (9-25) is correct
as to my knowledge. Though I might be able to add a few things
here. General American started to repaint Swift's meat reefer into
the bright red scheme in late 1949. The sides and ends are were
bright caboose red with a white fascia board that continued around
the side and ends. The roofs on the wood cars were BCR, and the
underframes black. Yes, photos show that some cars did indeed
have BCR ends, and as we all know you can not argue with a
photo, but the usual disclaimer applies here, make sure of the
date of the photo you are using as help.

Regards,

Jerry Stewart
Chicago, Ill.




--- In STMFC@..., Richard Hendrickson <rhendrickson@...>
wrote:

On Sep 24, 2006, at 7:11 AM, Scott Pitzer scottp3212000 wrote:

Is there a pattern (chronological or ???) to whether a Swift
wooden
car with red sides would have red ends or "box car red" ends?
When Swift went to the all-red scheme in the 1950s, the entire car
body
was red - sides, ends, roof.

Richard Hendrickson


Upcoming kits

Jim King
 

Most of you know that I recently left O scale in favor of S for personal
(it's a great size) and business reasons (O resin market is rapidly
disapperaing). I am still very active in the HO market but "behind the
scenes" and not publically vocal about my involvement. (Some of you
have purchased kits from the CGRHS and SRHA recently ... if either the
SR low side gon or CG vent box has been in your goody bag, then you've
seen proof of my involvement in HO.)

We all know that HO is, by far, the most popular scale, especially for
resin kits. While I don't plan to personally model in HO, there has
been a continuing stream of requests by loyal customers for me to NOT
leave HO completely. So, I've put their requests together with my
agenda and come up with the following win/win scenario (I hope).

There are many cars begging to be produced in S scale but the market is
very small and cannot justify the development costs to produce a kit,
particularly some of the more obscure cars, such as SAL wood racks or
FEC cabooses. However, by offering the same cars in HO I can spread my
CAD time over 2 scales, thereby increasing the likelihood of an S scale
project being more profitable. The beauty of working in 3D CAD is that
the same info can be used for any scale (with some modifications) as I
move from HO to S or vice versa. By not having to spend countless hours
in front of a 'puter monitor fussing with dimensions for EACH scale, I
can offer the same car to 2 markets and spread the time.

What does this mean for HO'ers? Well, it appears that I'll still be
introducing new HO models over the coming months but ONLY those that I
plan to offer in S, too. For example, the popular SR low side gon,
offered thru the SRHA, is due out in S scale late next month. The HO
CofG ventilated box, offered thru the CGRHS, will also be done in S
(both kits have CAD-generated patterns for the HO versions). I've been
asked to bring out 3 SAL cars in HO (and S, of course) ... the low side
gon, the high side gon and a 40' wood rack similar to Tichy's model of a
few years ago. The list goes on but is not limited to SAL, CG or SR,
nor to the steam era.

I'm open to suggestions for other kits. The only requirement is that I
**MUST** be interested in producing XYZ-kit in S or the HO version won't
be made, since S is my primary market. Current HO kits (Silverside gon,
SR wood caboose, SR 41' flat and SR 41' composite gon) will remain
active though the wood cab is currently out of production and the market
is not strong enough to bring it back ... yet. That would make a really
cute (ooooh, what an awful word for a RR item!) model in S .....

Please don't think I'm bouncing back and forth between scales with no
vision as to "what I want to be when I grow up". I'm firmly entrenched
in S and have many new products in various stages of completion; far
more than I had in HO or O. I'm simply trying to fulfill the needs of
loyal customers who were disappointed by my leaving HO for other scales.
The need for southern/southeastern models is stronger now than ever
before, thanks to some really great locomotive offerings of late. The
"big guys" (Athearn, Intermountain, Atlas, Kadee, etc.) won't produce
the obscure, dedicated-railroad kits that resin makers are known for.
My getting back into HO resin kit production is "real", but only if the
same car has a place in the S market.

Jim King
Smoky Mountain Model Works, Inc.
http://www.smokymountainmodelworks.com


Re: Red Caboose 42' Flat Cars-Which Roads are Accurate?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Sep 25, 2006, at 11:30 AM, Bruce Smith wrote:

The Red Caboose 42' flat is a USRA (fishbelly sills) 50 ton flat that
is a New York Central prototype. Similar cars, but with minor changes
are good for C&O, C&NW, B&M, FEC, PM, DT&I, TC, GN, W&LE.
No, no, Bruce, the RC flat does NOT represent the USRA flat car design. The USRA design, though not produced for the USRA during WE I, was built (sometimes with very minor modifications) for a number of RRs in the 1920s, including several of those you mention above (as well as others, e.g. DSS&A). But the prototype for the RC model was NYC lot 598-F, number series 496000-496299, built in the NYC's Avis, PA shops in 1930. Though these cars were certainly similar in dimensions and appearance to the USRA flat cars, their distinguishing feature was that the spacing between the endmost pairs of stake pockets was closer than the spacing of the other stake pockets, and there were other differences as well. Other flat cars built at about the same time that also exhibited this feature were built for the W&LE (later NKP) and PM (later C&O). The model can be used as a stand-in for the USRA flat cars, depending on how fussy you want to be about accuracy, but it does not model them correctly, nor was it intended to.

Richard Hendrickson


Re: Composite hopper slope sheet material?

Jerry Dziedzic
 

--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:

During Leonor Loree's long tenure as President of the D&H (1907-
1938), the railroad was remarkable for its conservatism regarding
motive power and rolling stock design. The D&H hung on to
Consolidations as mainline frieght power long after other roads
Can't help but repeat one of my favorite Loree stories, which appeared
in an April 1967 article in Trains. Loree was in union negotiations
with the firemen and they asked for stokers: "Stokers! [Loree snorted]
You've got the best stokers $1.25 will buy -- Red Edges!" Red Edge was
a brand of coal scoop.

To lift tonnage out of Carbondale over Ararat Mountain, D&H didn't just
doublehead Consolidations. They doubleheaded firemen, because one man
and a Red Edge couldn't keep up with the firebox.


Jerry Dziedzic
Pattenburg, NJ


Re: Why does data & photographs support wide distribution of boxcars? (Was - New Books)

Kurt Laughlin <fleeta@...>
 

Hi:

This is interesting: Covered hoppers traveled empty more than half the time (miles, actually). I would've expected them to match tanks at 50% empty. In fact I'm surprised that 50% wasn't the floor for usage. What was happening that caused the number to go below 50%? (I'm imagining this isn't just a "Loaded route was 50 miles, return was 52 because of a washout last week" type of thing. To have even a 1% effect on the whole fleet means it had to be large/frequent.)

KL

----- Original Message -----
From: Tim Gilbert
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Monday, September 25, 2006 10:07 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Why does data & photographs support wide distribution of boxcars? (Was - New Books)


.
This is
confirmed by the average percent loaded car miles of total car miles for
the individual car types as per the following in 1948-49 & 1956-56:

Car Type________1948-49____1956-57

Cov Hoppers ------ 47% -------- 47%

Tank Cars --------- 50% -------- 49%


Re: Red vs. BCR ends on red Swift wood reefers

Scott Pitzer
 

The 1954 Sioux City panorama is in Gene Green's Refrigerator Car Color
Guide also.
A car painted in 1950 is shown in the book, with red ends. Several
cars photographed later in the 50s have BCR ends. I have a feeling it
was found to be impractical to keep red ends looking good, what with
wheel spray and the other dirt that collects on ends.
My car will be for early 1954, so I think my choices are BCR, or
bright-red-with-dirt...

Scott Pitzer

138941 - 138960 of 195626