Date   

Re: Tools/workbench for model building

jerryglow2
 

If I remember right the PFMs were vernier calibers - I recommend a
reasonably priced dial (or digital) and calculator.

Jerry Glow

--- In STMFC@..., Denny Anspach <danspach@m...> wrote:

If you can find a set, the PFM Mitutoyo vernier calipers that
they
imported so many years ago are truly outstanding. They read in
both prototype and 1:87 inches. If I recall correctly, they were
about $25-30 thirty years ago, which tells you something of the
quality. Although by serendipity I also have premium Swiss and
German calipers (one of which is dual-reading with metric), the
PFM
is always my right hand. I have avoided the digital calipers if
only
because I don't want a single more thing that requires a battery!

Tweezers: Jack Burgess mentioned the Vigor tweezers that he
values
so much. Do you have the model number? I have just about used up
my
collection of fine surgical tweezers collected so many years ago
(generally, perfectly OK tools tossed across the operating room by
frustrated surgeons taking out their troubles on the tools at
hand.
Once tossed, they could not be used again..... except by me!).

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, California


Re: Tools/workbench for model building

ljack70117@...
 

On Dec 11, 2005, at 5:03 PM, Schuyler Larrabee wrote:

Larry (he of manifold experiences) Jackman writes:

Do not depend on any caliper including the Starrett for an
accurate measurement. But for what we do in modeling they are OK.
Um, why not?

SGL
They do not repeat. I worked in a shop that supported a plant that made aircraft parts and they were were not allowed to be used on the parts. You could use them on rough measurements but never on a finished part.
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...


DM&IR black single-sheathed box cars

Thomas Baker
 

Some years ago I purchased a slide of a location on the DM&IR. In the background are two or three single-sheathed box cars painted black. Was this the color of DM&IR box cars, or were these cars just downgraded to company service only? Since the cars are in the background, I cannot be sure what type of single-sheathed cars they were. Perhaps someone on the list knows.

Tom


Re: Tools/workbench for model building

Tony Thompson
 

Jack Burgess wrote:
On one side it says:

3C
Vigor
B. Jadow Inc.
Switzerland

and on the other side:

TW - 203C
These are sold as electron microscopy tweezers, and they have several models in addition to 3C.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: refrigerator car heaters/reefers

Roger Hinman <rhinman@...>
 

MDT owned a large quantity of heaters and since they serviced the BAR, it is quite likely their heaters were used

Roger Hinman

On Dec 11, 2005, at 9:28 AM, Tim Gilbert wrote:

Don Worthy wrote:

This is a part of railroading that I've never known anything about. Is
it possible to have a photo or a drawing of a heater posted. I'd love
to see one.
This, also, makes me wonder if the Boston & Maine used these
heaters. I believe that I'd heard that potatoes had to be heated
during shipping.
They may have been used on the B&M, but most of that road's potato
traffic originated on the Bangor & Aroostook (BAR).

Tim Gilbert



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Re: Tools/workbench for model building

Jack Burgess <jack@...>
 

Denny asked:

Tweezers: Jack Burgess mentioned the Vigor tweezers that he values
so much. Do you have the model number?
On one side it says:

3C
Vigor
B. Jadow Inc.
Switzerland

and on the other side:

TW - 203C



Jack Burgess
www.yosemitevalleyrr.com


Re: Tools/workbench for model building

Denny Anspach <danspach@...>
 

If you can find a set, the PFM Mitutoyo vernier calipers that they imported so many years ago are truly outstanding. They read in both prototype and 1:87 inches. If I recall correctly, they were about $25-30 thirty years ago, which tells you something of the quality. Although by serendipity I also have premium Swiss and German calipers (one of which is dual-reading with metric), the PFM is always my right hand. I have avoided the digital calipers if only because I don't want a single more thing that requires a battery!

Tweezers: Jack Burgess mentioned the Vigor tweezers that he values so much. Do you have the model number? I have just about used up my collection of fine surgical tweezers collected so many years ago (generally, perfectly OK tools tossed across the operating room by frustrated surgeons taking out their troubles on the tools at hand. Once tossed, they could not be used again..... except by me!).

Denny

--
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, California


Re: FGE Mechanical Reefer Cars on GN

Schuyler Larrabee
 


Diesel fumes not toxic ???

Richard Wilkens
I love the smell of diesel fumes in the morning . . . .

8^)

SGL


FGE Mechanical Reefer Cars on GN

railsnw1 <railsnw@...>
 

I recently picked up some Great Northern Bulletins and Circulars
from the Cascade Division. The following is from a re-issued
circular from January 1, 1952.

CIRCULAR NO. 27

All concerned will please see that cars are placed in trains as
follows:
"FGE cars 100 to 109, inclusive, also FGE 39897 are all equipped
with Thermo-King refrigerating units using gasoline engines;
"To avoid exhaust gas fumes from these cars they must be handled
at least 5 cars ahead of caboose.
"Please see that instructions are issued to all concerned so
these cars will be properly placed in trains.
"FGE 39898 equipped with Frigidaire Diesel-electric
refrigeration unit does not emit carbon monoxide fumes. Diesel
exhaust this car and others now being constructed in FGE 200 series
not toxic."

Diesel fumes not toxic ???

Richard Wilkens


Re: Tools/workbench for model building

Tony Thompson
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote (responding to Larry Jackman):
Do not depend on any caliper including the Starrett for an
accurate measurement. But for what we do in modeling they are OK.
Um, why not?
I'm sure Larry is thinking of the machine shop, where a micrometer is essential for accurate and reproducible measurements. A caliper, or at least one south of big-buck prices, cannot do that. But as Larry mentioned, for most modeling a caliper is fine.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Tools/workbench for model building

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Larry (he of manifold experiences) Jackman writes:

Do not depend on any caliper including the Starrett for an
accurate measurement. But for what we do in modeling they are OK.
Um, why not?

SGL


Re: Tools/workbench for model building

Schuyler Larrabee
 

"Jack Burgess" wrote a very useful and informative post.
Two items especially rang a bell:
"an extremely fine pair of Vigor jeweler's tweezers. AND: "
Dial calipers - Mine is a 30-year-old Craftsman model. You'll
be surprised how many drill bits are in the wrong space after
checking them with a set of calipers."

DON'T SCRIMP ON TWEEZERS! You can easily guess how I know!
The little machine shop - www.littlemachineshop.com has a
very nice electronic dial caliper, LMS part number 1758 for
$19.95 It measures both millimeters and inches at the push
of a button. Not starrett quality but I have found it very useful.
Lynn Finch
I have several pairs of tweezers, including to the amazement of several on this list, two pair of
self-closing tweezers, which I like because they provide a handle which allows me to place the
object very carefully. If I use conventional tweezers, my hand gets shaky, and now that I'm used to
the self-closing ones, I sometimes end up squeezing HARDER on the part when I'm trying to let go!

But as to calipers, I concur heartily that they are VERY useful. I too seldom use a scale rule
because I have taken the chart that (used to be, anyway) on the back cover of the Kadee catalog,
which gives the decimal inch equivalent of prototype dimensions in HO scale, half-sized it, and
laminated it. It's on my workbench all the time, as are the calipers

The scale rule is only for gross, approximate measurements.

SGL


Re: Vermillion Klasing hand brake

Clark Propst <cepropst@...>
 

It seems I'm emailing myself here. I found the photocopy I made from a friends Train Shed magazine of a builders photo of a CGW 90000 series box car. I can only make out one spoke of the brake wheel in the photocopy. It does appear to match the Klasing brake wheels pictured in RP Cyc 10. I think I'll try an Equipco wheel and try to place a disc over the center section.
Clark Propst


Trackside in St Louis

Tim O'Connor
 

I just thought I'd pass along some highlights from this
Morning Sun book that might interest freight car fans:

- pp. 16-17 1956 views of a C&NW piggyback car & trailer
- p.23 1957 photo of 3 CB&Q piggyback cars & trailers
- p.29 partial view of a WARREN tank car w/ gray/black tank
- p.51 1956 photo of 3 MKT piggyback cars & trailers
- p.56 undated photo shows
-- an SLSF refrigerator car !!!
-- a black SP Overnight box car
-- a D&RGW AAR flat car loaded with Farmall tractors
- p.80 1955 photo of a spliced RI rebuilt flat w/ a PCC car load
- p.90 1955 photo has a nice view of NYC 210030 auto box car (?)
- p.91 1957 photo shows yellow SLSF flat w/ wrecked B&O box car load
- p.117 1956 photo of new Ann Arbor PS-1 w/ black ends, unpainted roof

And for SP/SSW fans, page 96 has a terrific 1956 overhead view of
SSW 306, the Cotton Belt's only Daylight painted FP7.

Tim O.


Re: Tools/workbench for model building

ljack70117@...
 

On Dec 11, 2005, at 11:47 AM, Lynn Finch wrote:


"Jack Burgess" wrote a very useful and informative post. Two items
especially rang a bell:
"an extremely fine pair of Vigor jeweler's tweezers. AND: " Dial calipers -
Mine is a 30-year-old Craftsman model. You'll be surprised how many drill
bits are in the wrong space after checking them with a set of calipers."
I would bet they are still in the wrong holes if you used a dial calipers to check their size. The only way to measure them correctly is with a drill gauge.

DON'T SCRIMP ON TWEEZERS! You can easily guess how I know!
The little machine shop - www.littlemachineshop.com has a very nice
electronical dial caliper, LMS part number 1758 for $19.95 It measures both
millimeters and inches at the push of a button. Not starrett quality but I
have found it very useful.
Do not depend on any caliper including the Starrett for an accurate measurement. But for what we do in modeling they are OK.

Lynn Finch
Thank you
Larry Jackman
ljack70117@...


Re: smoke jacks

Tony Thompson
 

ed_mines wrote:
Tony, they're what I'd describe as smoke jacks.
There's a lot of white "smoke" in the picture, coming from both the
locomotive and those pipes, whatever they are.
In that case the cars are mechanical refrigerators, or cars (probably Canadian, as they had lots of them) with underslung heaters, not bunker heaters of the kind I was describing.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: single sheathed box cars

Tony Thompson
 

Were the sides of 40 ft. single sheathed box cars made of 17 ft. long
planks or could shorter, less expensive planks be used?
Yes.

When the cars were painted would a rotten portion of a plank be
replaced?
Yes.

Anthony Thompson
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937;
e-mail: thompsonmarytony@...


Re: refrigerator car heaters/reefers

Tony Thompson
 

Tom Olsen wrote:
PFE heaters were marked with their name on the heater jacket. I have a
buddy who has a PFE heater in his basement and it is clearly marked as
such. The one that he has is about three feet high and about 1.5 feet
in diameter. Not exactly something that would walk off on it's own!
This would be a charcoal heater; see pages 347 and 412 in the PFE book, 2nd edition for photos. The alcohol heaters which replaced them were much smaller. Naturally PFE marked them, but I bet there was a steady "leakage" rate.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


single sheathed box cars

ed_mines
 

Were the sides of 40 ft. single sheathed box cars made of 17 ft. long
planks or could shorter, less expensive planks be used?

When the cars were painted would a rotten portion of a plank be
replaced?

Ed


smoke jacks

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tony Thompson <thompsonmarytony@s...>
asked: "Stacks? What stacks? Tall stacks sound like vents, not
heaters." in reply to my comment "I'm surprised at how tall the stacks
are, a couple feet above the tops of the cars

Tony, they're what I'd describe as smoke jacks.

There's a lot of white "smoke" in the picture, coming from both the
locomotive and those pipes, whatever they are.

Ed

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