Date   

Re: SWPX 152 & 153

Ed Hawkins
 

On Saturday, September 3, 2005, at 09:09 PM, Rob Kirkham wrote:

I am looking to identify who the owner of this reporting mark is.  An
AC&F
photo of each of these cars, with built dates in October 1929, is the
only
clue I have to them. The photo also credits CC&F, which leads me to
think
these might have a Canadian buyer.  They show a single and double dome
tank
car.  I was hoping they might be related to Sherwin Williams Canada,
but
these would be the wrong reporting mark.
Rob,
The customer designated in the AC&F lot number list for these two cars
(lot no. 1005 and 1006) was Canadian Car & Foundry Company. The
reporting marks SWPX were for Shawinigan Chemicals Limited of Montreal.
The two cars are listed in the 7/33 ORER, as well as 151 and 154-155.
The 151-154 cars were 6,000-gallon and 155 was 8,000-gallon (nominal
sizes). Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


SWPX 152 & 153

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

I am looking to identify who the owner of this reporting mark is. An AC&F photo of each of these cars, with built dates in October 1929, is the only clue I have to them. The photo also credits CC&F, which leads me to think these might have a Canadian buyer. They show a single and double dome tank car. I was hoping they might be related to Sherwin Williams Canada, but these would be the wrong reporting mark.

Thanks

Rob Kirkham


Molasses Tank car

w2msj
 

I heard from John LaRue and he has an 8 x 10 photo of of ISTX 533 which was
built in 12-1919, picture was taken 12-30-50; Tank labeled SOUTHGATE
MOLASSES COMPANY; Lynn Finch

<<<<<<<If you do track down any photos, please let me know - So. Ryegate
will be a major focus of my (HO) layout, so I really need at least one
appropriately lettered tank car. Irv Thomae in Norwich, Vermont >>>>>>>>

.


Re: TAN: labeling freight car photos

Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

On Sat, September 3, 2005 12:33 pm, Anthony Thompson wrote:
Peter Bowers wrote:
I think we are off topic for the list again but be careful of stick on
labels unless they are acid free archive quality. Regular ones will
eventually turn the area under it brown. Af for pen on photos, that
will
bleed through time. The pencil is best.
But with the plastic process paper widely used today, the pencil
doesn't write. I use a grease pencil along the photo margin on the
front. It wipes off readily if needed, but if on the margin can usually
stay there.
Thanks to everyone for their thoughts! I too had trouble with pencil,
which in part led to my question. It looks like Tony's method is best
unless I can find an archival quality label, and of course, archival ink
for it (acid free on all accounts, I'm sure)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: TAN: labeling freight car photos

VERLIN WHITE
 

Hello
My name is Verlin White, I'm new to this group and I thought you might want to use what I use.
A DYMO LetraTag Persoal Labelmaker with paper label tape.

Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:
Morning Folks,

I am looking for some advice on the best method of archival labeling of
photographic prints of freight cars. I am worried that writing on the back
with a ballpoint pen might eventually lead to damage of the image.

BTW, I recently ordered two 8x10 prints of a PRR F22 gun flat from the
Florida Photographic Collection
(http://www.floridamemory.com/PhotographicCollection/). I have to say
that given today's costs, the $10 a print and $2 for shipping seemed quite
reasonable, and the prints were made and shipped to me within 2 weeks.
The folks I dealt with were extremely helpful and I highly reccomend using
this resource if they have images that you are interested in.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL



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Re: CNW 40ft PS-1 boxcar details

Mark Heiden
 

Hello Jack,

Thanks for posting the links! I found several pictures of cars from
the number series I'm interested in.

Thanks again,
Mark Heiden


--- In STMFC@..., "Jack Mullen" <jack.f.mullen@g...>
wrote:
Mark Heiden wrote:
Hello Ed,

Thanks for the information. Are any of the photos you listed
published, like in the Freight Cars of the Fifties series in
Model
Railroading magazine? Also, Kadee released two PS-1 models from
this series, cars 664 and 1555. Are these accurate enough to
use
as
a reference for painting and lettering?

Thanks again,
Mark Heiden
Mark,
here are some photos online at the C&NW Historical society's
website
( http://www.cnwhs.org/ ).

Two views of CNW 1432 in 1981, still in steam-era paint:
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?album=6&pos=14
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?album=6&pos=15

CNW 1 from the previous series 1-625, when new in 1953:
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?album=6&pos=13

If the links don't work, go to the site, choose Photos from the
menu, then go to the 2nd page of the Freightcars section.

While most of the freight car photos on this site are post steam-
era, there are others of interest to STMFC listers.


Re: CNW 40ft PS-1 boxcar details

Jack Mullen
 

Mark Heiden wrote:
Hello Ed,

Thanks for the information. Are any of the photos you listed
published, like in the Freight Cars of the Fifties series in Model
Railroading magazine? Also, Kadee released two PS-1 models from
this series, cars 664 and 1555. Are these accurate enough to use
as
a reference for painting and lettering?

Thanks again,
Mark Heiden
Mark,
here are some photos online at the C&NW Historical society's website
( http://www.cnwhs.org/ ).

Two views of CNW 1432 in 1981, still in steam-era paint:
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?album=6&pos=14
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?album=6&pos=15

CNW 1 from the previous series 1-625, when new in 1953:
http://www.cnwhs.org/memberphotos/displayimage.php?album=6&pos=13

If the links don't work, go to the site, choose Photos from the
menu, then go to the 2nd page of the Freightcars section.

While most of the freight car photos on this site are post steam-
era, there are others of interest to STMFC listers.


--- In STMFC@..., Ed Hawkins <hawk0621@s...> wrote:
Mark,
The first 800 cars had Youngstown doors and the last 200 cars
had
5-panel Superior doors. Hand brakes were Miner, Ajax, and
Universal,
however I don't know the exact car number assignments. Running
boards
were either Apex or U.S. Gypsum. Photos show that most, if not
all,
cars had A-3 R.C. trucks. In addition to the Whittaker photo,
there's a
bunch of available photos of cars from this series, including
from
Richard Burg (664/1289), Bob's Photo (1219 in color), Charles
Winters
collection (1572), Joe Collias (1008/1588), Dick Kuelbs (691),
and
Mike
Gruber (664/838/1289 from the Tom Martorano collection). Hope
this
helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins



Re: Decals Atop Murphy Corrugations (Westerfield)

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Sep 3, 2005, at 3:42 PM, luzhin1 wrote:

I'm building a Westerfield USRA SS boxcar (NYC), a car which, in its
1920s incarnation, had four lines of brake data stenciled on the tops
of the corrugations on the Murphy ends. Each line of stenciling must
be positioned exactly atop the corrugations. Has anyone done this?
Should each strip of data be applied separately (rather difficult to
do; they wobble atop the corrugations). On the other hand, I'm
worried that applying them as a set of four will cause the
lettering--once the setting solutions has begun to work--to slip down
between the corrugations. In other words, laying a "sheet" of four
lines of data across the corrugations and expecting them to "melt"
into place once the solution is applied, and expecting the film to
reach all the way down into the valleys of the corrugations: well, it
seems too much to ask of the decals.
Greg:

Cut them into four distinct strips. Position them on the model and let them dry COMPLETELY (they will silver, but that is okay at this point). Apply decal setting solution with a brush to the edge of each decal so that capillary action pulls it under the decal. Leave alone again until completely dry. Apply setting solution again and at that point they should be secure enough to cut, poke, prick, etc. to remove trapped air.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
645 Tanner Marsh Road, Guilford, CT 06437
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Decals Atop Murphy Corrugations (Westerfield)

luzhin1
 

I'm building a Westerfield USRA SS boxcar (NYC), a car which, in its
1920s incarnation, had four lines of brake data stenciled on the tops
of the corrugations on the Murphy ends. Each line of stenciling must
be positioned exactly atop the corrugations. Has anyone done this?
Should each strip of data be applied separately (rather difficult to
do; they wobble atop the corrugations). On the other hand, I'm
worried that applying them as a set of four will cause the
lettering--once the setting solutions has begun to work--to slip down
between the corrugations. In other words, laying a "sheet" of four
lines of data across the corrugations and expecting them to "melt"
into place once the solution is applied, and expecting the film to
reach all the way down into the valleys of the corrugations: well, it
seems too much to ask of the decals.

Has anyone done this successfully? Any advice?

Greg Smith


Re: Canadian Pacific gondolas CP353100-353499

Doug Rhodes
 

Thanks for this info!

I have not seen a CPR planbook as such, but there are definitely car diagrams and even engineering drawings in existence. The CP SIG has been scanning these into a growing document library at http://www.cpsig.ca/cpdocs/main.asp This is a terrific resource for locos, rolling stock and structures already in the collection.

Regrettably, nothing is there yet for the car series in question, so your info greatly expands what I had available!

Thanks
Doug

----- Original Message -----
From: "al_brown03" <abrown@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 03, 2005 5:55 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Canadian Pacific gondolas CP353100-353499


True, the picture's real dark, but one can see it's a low-side car
with straight underframe and side sills. The brake gear shows nicely
as does the lettering. The hand brake has a handle not a wheel. The
trucks are "Bettendorfs" (hard to see which kind), and I *think* the
sides have eleven panels (end two longer than those in between). The
caption gives dimensions, states there are drop ends and a wood floor.
All in all better than nothing.

Is there such a thing as a CPR planbook? That would show the side-
panel arrangement and probably state the type of trucks.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@c...> wrote:


Too bad it's not really a good photo! :-(



At 11:38 PM 9/2/2005, you wrote:
Hi Doug --

There's a photo of car 353312 in Train Shed Cyclopedia #70, p 223.

-- best --

-- Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: TAN: labeling freight car photos

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Peter Bowers wrote:
I think we are off topic for the list again but be careful of stick on
labels unless they are acid free archive quality. Regular ones will
eventually turn the area under it brown. Af for pen on photos, that will
bleed through time. The pencil is best.
But with the plastic process paper widely used today, the pencil doesn't write. I use a grease pencil along the photo margin on the front. It wipes off readily if needed, but if on the margin can usually stay there.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Ann Arbor MOW paint

bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

It does answer my question. Thanks.
Gene

--- In STMFC@..., "Bob Hainstock" <boblh@n...> wrote:
--- In STMFC@..., "bierglaeser" <bierglaeser@y...>
wrote:
Will an Ann Arbor expert please contact me off list about
the "pink"
paint used by the Annie on MOW equipment?

Gene Green
bierglaeser at yahoo dot com.
Thanks!
It's just faded orange paint. The #10 here at Green Bay was in the
orange/pink paint until it was repainted to represent a GBW unit.
When
paint oxidizes, it will often appear in another color. Years ago,
when
I lived down south, a group that I was a member of owned several
Sou.
heavyweight cars, The pullman green that they were painted in
changed
to an oxide red, or blue-green, the difference probably due to
different
batches of paint, or different paint manufactueres. At the museum
here
in GB, they coated some of their faded pieces of equipment with
clear
coat as a short term fix to this problem. Hope this answers the
question.
Bob Hainstock


Re: Ann Arbor MOW paint

Bob Hainstock <boblh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "bierglaeser" <bierglaeser@y...> wrote:
Will an Ann Arbor expert please contact me off list about the "pink"
paint used by the Annie on MOW equipment?

Gene Green
bierglaeser at yahoo dot com.
Thanks!
It's just faded orange paint. The #10 here at Green Bay was in the
orange/pink paint until it was repainted to represent a GBW unit. When
paint oxidizes, it will often appear in another color. Years ago, when
I lived down south, a group that I was a member of owned several Sou.
heavyweight cars, The pullman green that they were painted in changed
to an oxide red, or blue-green, the difference probably due to different
batches of paint, or different paint manufactueres. At the museum here
in GB, they coated some of their faded pieces of equipment with clear
coat as a short term fix to this problem. Hope this answers the
question.
Bob Hainstock


Re: TAN: labeling freight car photos

PBowers <waiting@...>
 

I think we are off topic for the list again but be careful of stick on labels unless they are acid free archive quality. Regular ones will eventually turn the area under it brown. Af for pen on photos, that will bleed through time. The pencil is best.
Peter
At 09:44 AM 9/3/05, you wrote:
I use a mailing label program to print a simple label, which I can fill in the details prior to peeling it from the sheet and putting it on the back of the photo. - Steve Hile
Peter Bowers


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Ann Arbor MOW paint

bierglaeser <bierglaeser@...>
 

Will an Ann Arbor expert please contact me off list about the "pink"
paint used by the Annie on MOW equipment?

Gene Green
bierglaeser at yahoo dot com.
Thanks!


Re: TAN: labeling freight car photos

Steve and Barb Hile
 

I use a mailing label program to print a simple label, which I can fill in the details prior to peeling it from the sheet and putting it on the back of the photo.

Steve Hile

----- Original Message -----
From: Bruce Smith
To: stmfc@...
Sent: Saturday, September 03, 2005 8:26 AM
Subject: [STMFC] TAN: labeling freight car photos


Morning Folks,

I am looking for some advice on the best method of archival labeling of
photographic prints of freight cars. I am worried that writing on the back
with a ballpoint pen might eventually lead to damage of the image.
Snip

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TAN: labeling freight car photos

Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

Morning Folks,

I am looking for some advice on the best method of archival labeling of
photographic prints of freight cars. I am worried that writing on the back
with a ballpoint pen might eventually lead to damage of the image.

BTW, I recently ordered two 8x10 prints of a PRR F22 gun flat from the
Florida Photographic Collection
(http://www.floridamemory.com/PhotographicCollection/). I have to say
that given today's costs, the $10 a print and $2 for shipping seemed quite
reasonable, and the prints were made and shipped to me within 2 weeks.
The folks I dealt with were extremely helpful and I highly reccomend using
this resource if they have images that you are interested in.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Re: Canadian Pacific gondolas CP353100-353499

al_brown03
 

True, the picture's real dark, but one can see it's a low-side car
with straight underframe and side sills. The brake gear shows nicely
as does the lettering. The hand brake has a handle not a wheel. The
trucks are "Bettendorfs" (hard to see which kind), and I *think* the
sides have eleven panels (end two longer than those in between). The
caption gives dimensions, states there are drop ends and a wood floor.
All in all better than nothing.

Is there such a thing as a CPR planbook? That would show the side-
panel arrangement and probably state the type of trucks.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@c...> wrote:


Too bad it's not really a good photo! :-(



At 11:38 PM 9/2/2005, you wrote:
Hi Doug --

There's a photo of car 353312 in Train Shed Cyclopedia #70, p 223.

-- best --

-- Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.


Re: TAN: labeling freight car photos

artrich999@...
 

Bruce, and others;
I was told by the archivist at the MS Department of Archives and History
to label the back of prints with a #2 pencil. He said that was permanent and
had less chance of damaging the photo than any other type of labeling.

---
Art Richardson
Clinton, MS


Re: Weevil-control lining in boxcars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Greg Martin wrote:
The subject goes beyond the scope of this list, but there were such things
in the fifties as well it was just a different type of packet that hung in the
cars.
I don't think that's the whole story. SP was installing fiberglass to fill the gaps in Dreadnaught car ends and sheathing it with wood for "insect control" in the 1950s. I don't know if that would work specifically for weevils <g>.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

150601 - 150620 of 195499