Date   

Re: NYC "USRA" Boxcars - How Many is Enough?

ed_mines
 

--- In STMFC@..., Bruce Smith <smithbf@v...> wrote:
During my era, PRR averaged 50% home road cars.

Bruce, I'm curious, how did you arrive at that? I recall your era is
during the box car shortage.

Ed


Re: speaking of distinctive Pennsy cars..... the H33

Gatwood, Elden <Elden.Gatwood@...>
 

Scott;
I and several others have kitbashed these from the old MDC covered
hopper. The basic body has the right proportions for this bash. You
could use others, but why pay more; you are butchering the body as it
is. All you really use from the MDC is the basic body core, with end
assemblies removed and ribs shaved off. The body needs to be cut down
to proper height, and a new roof overlay applied after shaving off all
roof detail and sanding it thinner. The end assemblies can be built up
with common shapes, and new vertical end sheets (not slope sheets)
created. Yes, the DA hatches are fine for this; not perfect, but hey,
no one is doing this car in plastic. The ribs are actually "z" shaped
in reality, but it hardly shows. I used small rectangular cross-section
styrene stock; probably .03 x .04 or similar (sorry, I don't remember)
on top of the sanded bases of the original MDC shell (their ribs shave
off pretty easily). You need to make several small loading placards and
instruction placards for sides and ends.

I used Kadee RB trucks, but your choice is probably better (I did mine
many moons ago). Yes, they had roller bearing trucks as-built. I used
Champ decals, which turned out OK with lots of weathering.

I used my old Floquil mix on this one, as the cars were painted in CK
scheme prior to 1954, so it actually was pretty red as-built. I think
the mix was 50/50 bcr and zinc oxide primer, with more bcr added to make
it redder. I had to weather mine very heavily, anyway, so it didn't
really matter what I started with; but just not brown! They accumulated
a lot of soot, as well as the usual corrosion they suffered as a result
of the commodities hauled.

Sorry, I don't remember what brake gear these guys used. I remember
making piping and rods and such from wire, and plumbing it more simply
than I would do nowdays. Oh, I think I used an early etched running
board in an Apex pattern, plus I used DA ladder stock and resin tack
boards I made up for all sorts of projects. Add a lip to the bottom of
the side using thin styrene strip. You might try DA for the hopper gate
assemblies. They are that early type with vertical braces, so you may
have to make them from angle stock. The shaker pads on mine were just
little squares made from sheet (see vol.1 of the color guides). I think
a few had these simple ones, but a number had the more complex pads.

I hope this helps.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: blindog@... [mailto:blindog@...]
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2005 9:58 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] speaking of distinctive Pennsy cars..... the H33


I've had an itch to kitbash a Pennsy H33 out of a Bowser or Kato 1,958cf
covered hopper ever since the "paint schemes of the Pennsy's covered
hoppers" issue of "The Keystone" came out. These were basically copies
of the 1,958cf design except they were welded and had evenly spaced
hatches, etc. Built circa 1953 just before P-S intruduced the
all-welded PS-2/2003 in 1954, of which Pennsy was one of the first
buyers, their H34 class. I gather they were among the first
general-service covered hopper fleets to come with roller bearing
trucks. Is this correct?

Anyone built one of these yet? My abuilding H30 will need company.
Seems to be fairly straightfoward: Make a new roof using DA square
hatches. Slap a comparitively tall end sheet over the end bracing.
What is the size of the side stakes? Am I going to have to shave off
all the stakes on a Bowser body? Sit it on Athearn-Genesis's "70-ton"
roller bearing trucks with the rotating bearing caps. Paint it Freight
Car Color (probably the more brownish shade, not iron oxide), and
weather to taste. Not much here, since the layout it will run on is set
in western Pennsylvania in 1954-55.

Thoughts?

Scott C





Yahoo! Groups Links


FS 1946 and 1953 CBC's

Dave Nelson <muskoka@...>
 

New this morning. Prices a bit lower than average.

Dave Nelson

---------------------------

The seller is Second Story Books, ABAA

12160 Parklawn Dr. , Rockville, MD, U.S.A., 20852.

< <mailto:internetdeskssb@...>
mailto:internetdeskssb@...> Ph: (301) 770-0477 Fax: (301)
770-9544

Terms of sale: INCLUDE THE BOOKSELLER INVENTORY# or CATALOG # of the TITLE
in QUESTION IN ANY CORRESPONDENCE.



3. 1946 CAR BUILDERS' CYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN PRACTICE by Wright, Roy V.
(ed.) Simmons-Boardman New York 1946 (Seventeenth Edition) 4to in pebbled
tan/brown cloth w/dull gilt spine & cover textboxes & text. VG-. Textblock
split at title page verso & last page recto. Board edges rubbed, boards
soil-smudged. Former owner's address stamp on endpapers, front pastedown
(w/additional former owner's name in pen). 1444pp chockful of b&w photos,
ills, schematics & adverts. (Keywords: TRANSPORTATION) The price of the book
is US$ 175.00 DUE TO THE UNPREDICTABLE DELIVERY OF BOOKS SENT BY ECONOMY
MAIL OVERSEAS OR, TO A LESSER EXTENT, MEDIA MAIL DOMESTICALLY; WE CANNOT BE
HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR PACKAGES SHIPPED USING THESE< THE LEAST EXPENSIVE
METHODS. PLEASE CONSIDER THIS BEFORE CHOOSING A SHIPPING OPTION. THANK YOU.

PLEASE OBSERVE THE FOLLOWING IN ANY CORRESPONDENCE:

1. EMAIL (preferred): INCLUDE THE COMPLETE BOOKSELLER ID# and TITLE IN ANY
CORRESPONDENCE.

2. By Phone: PLEASE LEAVE THE CATALOG#, Title, & your EMAIL ADDRESS ON OUR
VOICE MAIL.

3. PLEASE DO NOT SEND CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS WITHOUT PRIOR CONFIRMATION OF
THE BOOK"S AVAILABILITY. DO NOT SEND CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS WITHOUT
REFERENCE TO THE COMPLETE TITLE & CATALOG#.

Please reference the seller's book # 9-98-665091 when ordering.

4. CAR BUILDER'S CYCLOPEDIA OF AMERICAN PRACTICE 1953 by Peck, C. B.
Simmons-Boardman New York 1953 (nineteenth edition) 4to in red cloth. VG.
hinge cracked, but not split after p.2. board corners and spine ends
slightly bumped. text block darkened, pages lightly age-toned. 1280pp. spine
red dark blue text. above RRs. (Keywords: TRAINS & RAILWAYS) The price of
the book is US$ 125.00 DUE TO THE UNPREDICTABLE DELIVERY OF BOOKS SENT BY
ECONOMY MAIL OVERSEAS OR, TO A LESSER EXTENT, MEDIA MAIL DOMESTICALLY; WE
CANNOT BE HELD RESPONSIBLE FOR PACKAGES SHIPPED USING THESE< THE LEAST
EXPENSIVE METHODS. PLEASE CONSIDER THIS BEFORE CHOOSING A SHIPPING OPTION.
THANK YOU.

PLEASE OBSERVE THE FOLLOWING IN ANY CORRESPONDENCE:

1. EMAIL (preferred): INCLUDE THE COMPLETE BOOKSELLER ID# and TITLE IN ANY
CORRESPONDENCE.

2. By Phone: PLEASE LEAVE THE CATALOG#, Title, & your EMAIL ADDRESS ON OUR
VOICE MAIL.

3. PLEASE DO NOT SEND CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS WITHOUT PRIOR CONFIRMATION OF
THE BOOK"S AVAILABILITY. DO NOT SEND CHECKS OR MONEY ORDERS WITHOUT
REFERENCE TO THE COMPLETE TITLE & CATALOG#.

Please reference the seller's book # 9-132-6397 when ordering.


Re: NYC box car ID help

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Rob Kirkham wrote:
"Given all the discussion on NYC cars this today, perhaps its a good
time to ask if the four non-CPR cars in this detail can be
identified. <<snip>> So the usual questions if these photos allow
identification:"

Gon +3:
SSW 33500-33649, 33650-33699, or 33700-33849, modified 1937 AAR
boxcar. See Ed Hawkins' table at
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/prototype/frtcars/mod37aarpdfmain.htm
l
for specific details. Photo:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/ssw33841main.html
Use the Intermountain modified 1937 AAR boxcar kit. You're on your
own for the ACR.

Gon+2:
Most likely the NYC 8' 7" IH version of the USRA-design steel
boxcar. The ends are not visible, and it's very difficult to tell
if this car has been rebuilt with a new roof. See the Westerfield
data sheet for specific information on lot numbers and car number
series. Model: Westerfield 2901 or 2951. Photos:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/nyc38680main.html
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/mcrr-97999.jpg
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/nyc-38680.jpg
http://www.canadasouthern.com/caso/images/mcrr-82888.jpg

Gon -1:
NYC 8' 7" IH version of the USRA-design steel boxcar with what
appears to be Murphy ends. Model: Westerfield 2901.

Gon -2:
I don't agree with Jim Harr on this one for several reasons: (1)
the USRA DS boxcar has a 9' IH and should clearly be taller than the
NYC car; (2) the car lacks the distinct 6 rollers that the USRA DS
boxcar has in lieu of a lower door track, and (3) the car lacks the
indented side sill of a steel underframe DS boxcar. However, DL&W
did have similar boxcars to the USRA proposed steel boxcar design
with 8 panel sides and Dreadnaught ends in the 47000-47999 series.
Photos:
http://www.steamfreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/dlw47936main.html
These photos are from the pay side of the RPI website:
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/Box-cars/X29-types/DL&W-
xm-37-cyc.jpg
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/Box-cars/X29-types/XM-
X29-DL&W-47180-Winters.jpg
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/Box-cars/X29-types/XM-
USRA-steel-DL&W-Rail-Data-Services.jpg
http://railroad.union.rpi.edu/rolling-stock/Box-cars/X29-types/X29-
DL&W-Yungkurth.jpg
Model: Kitbash from Westerfield 2950 with new roof (Hutchins or
Murphy panel).


Ben Hom


Re: Hobby Shops

John Fitts <jefitts2003@...>
 

Zientek's really is one of a kind. During your visit, make certain to notice the fgreat old framed photos behind the bar. They depict the building from the 1930s--with streetcars passing by. The pictures must be post-Prohibition, because the place was a tavern even then.

Bruce Brantner <sfcoyote_2000@...> wrote:Thank you one and all for your suggestions on hobby
shops in the Chicago area. I have been to Zientek
hobby shop before. But it was so long ago, I didn't
think he was still located in the same place. Last
time we were there there was a shooting about a block
away. Neat neighborhood. The tavern part of the
building comes right out of the "mill town" 1920's
era. It is a must see shop in Chicago. I will be
stopping there on Saturday. Thanks again.

Bruce

=====
Bruce R. Brantner, Sr.
Coyote Trails RR
Coyote Div. of SF RR



__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Read only the mail you want - Yahoo! Mail SpamGuard.
http://promotions.yahoo.com/new_mail

Yahoo! Groups SponsorADVERTISEMENT
document.write('');

---------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links

To visit your group on the web, go to:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/

To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
STMFC-unsubscribe@...

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.




---------------------------------
Do you Yahoo!?
The all-new My Yahoo! – Get yours free!

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: The Fifth Rule

Bruce Smith <smithbf@...>
 

On Feb 15, 2005, at 9:24 PM, Mike Brock wrote:

It DOES state that for every frt train...excluding reefer blocks, coal
drags and oil trains...of over 20 cars [ and UP trains probably averaged
about 65 cars during that time period ], at least one NP box car would be
present.
Mike,

As you know, I'm a big supporter of Brock's 5th rule... Anecdotal evidence from PRR videos confirms the presence of at least one NP car in most, if not all through freights that were filmed.

Lets go to the numbers.

I have Tim saying that in 1947, NP had 3.2% of the fleet. That makes the numbers around 1 NP box car for every 30 foreign box cars, and in a worst case scenario (50% home road), that is 1 NP box in 60 boxcars. If the home road frequency is down to 25%, we get 1 in 40. Thus, with your average UP train of 65 cars, you are looking at a statistical aberration if a train does NOT have an NP box car <VBG>.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith
Auburn, AL
http://www.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy" - Benjamin Franklin
__
/ &#92;
__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________
|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |
| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||
|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|
| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0


Re: NYC box car ID help

James Harr <bnchmark@...>
 

Rob and list;

As per your identification system, "Gon -2" looks to me to be a DL&W
USRA DS boxcar, although the scan you posted does not contain enough
detail to be sure. The right-side lettering sure looks about right for
the "Route of The Phoebe Snow" slogan. Al Westerfield makes a perfect
kit for this car, kit number 3813. Online photos are out there; Schuyler
Larrabee provided some phenomenal photos that are on Ted's Steam Era
Feight Cars website. Oh, and I believe the number series were 44,000 -
44,799, but there was also a different type of car, number series
45,000-45,999; not sure which car type this would be though... HTH...

Jim Harr




Message: 4
Date: Tue, 15 Feb 2005 22:06:39 -0800
From: Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
Subject: NYC box car ID help

Given all the discussion on NYC cars this today, perhaps its a good time
to ask if the four non-CPR cars in this detail can be identified. The
photo was taken in the fall of 1952 on the CPR main in B.C. Using the
gondola as a guide, the car ahead (gon+1) is CPR. The next car (Gon =2)
I would guess is NYC. The next car forward (Gon +3), I don't know.
Moving backward from the gon, another NYC (gon -1) and then another
unknown to me (gon -2).

So the usual questions if these photos allow identification:

car / line / number series / modelling info and on
line photos
Gon +3 u/k u/k u/k
Gon+2 NYC? U/k u/k
Gon -1 NYC? U/k u/k
Gon -2 u/k u/k u/k

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

Rob Kirkham


ICC Document Collection at University of Denver

James F. Brewer <jfbrewer@...>
 

All,

This came across on the NWHS mailing list. It wasn't signed but it provides some information, given the recent discussion of this material on this list. Buyer beware :-)

Jim Brewer
Glenwood MD

Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 05:24:28 -0600
Subject: ICC document collection at Denver University

I am researching the historical relationship between
the railroads and Appalachian development patterns and
poverty, as a critique of the going paradigm in
economic geography. Being in Denver for the
holidays, I naturally wanted to check out the Denver
University collection of ICC documents.

I share some pointers about this huge document
collection. The most important is to contact
Christopher Brown of the Penrose Library before going
to Denver or the University, to make sure he can
assist you when you are there.

cbrown@...
Telephone: 303 871 3404

Let him know as specifically as possible what kind of
information you hope to find. Anticipating with some
time a sure visit on your part, he could be attentive
to your needs before you arrive, for example putting
an eye out for relevant documents while they are
cataloging.

He is a very informative and helpful reference
librarian, in charge of governmental documents.


Additional tips:
DON¨T take advantage of holiday or vacation periods
(when the people in the know are absent or are very
occupied), as I did;
DON¨T take the reference clerks word for anything in
the Law Library (where I started, unfortunately);
DON´T be discouraged by finding a sizeable collection
on ICC (including all the annual reports, some books
about the ICC and the like; which many law libraries
around the country should have) in the Law Library and
being given a resounding "no" to my entreaty that
there must be a lot more than this in the University.

The immense collection was moved from Washington in
1996, and the Penrose Library just now getting rolling
on the cataloging, going full speed
during five months to date. This will take several
years. They are starting with the numerous books, are
using empty and accessible shelf space for journals
and some governmental documents which will
then be cataloged, and the rest including archival
materials (about 20% of the total collection) is in
boxes and will be last. Apparently (I didn´t have
time to check), there is a complete collection of
state utility annual reports of all the States, at the
Colorado Supreme Court library. The DU collection
has fairly complete collections for
some States (not Appalachian States from what I could
see).

For my needs, Christopher showed me a collection of
documents with primary data regarding cases (mostly
cross references from the annual reports), in
the Penrose library (not the Law Library). And his
library has lots of governmental technical reports on
specific subjects, like pricing of coal transport.
This material predates and was cataloged before the
arrival of the huge document collection which they are
getting their teeth into.

Since I didn´t get to Christopher until the day before
my departure, I was limited in time to really get into
the collection.

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: NYC box car ID help

ed_mines
 

After the NYC car it looks like a box car with Lackawanna billboard
lettering.

Ed


Re: Off-line cars [Was: NYC "USRA" Boxcars - How Many . . .]

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Tim Gilbert wrote:
Where on the SP did this wheel report report? Can you provide a
breakdown of the car types - boxes, gons, flats, stock cars, reefers, etc.?
Mostly Oregon and northern California. I can send you the Excel file, Tim, if you like.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Chicago--Hobby Shop

Darren Plants <dplants@...>
 

A friend took me to Zientek's the first time, and I was amazed. I bought a
couple of Westerfield kits for $15 each. When I got them home and opened the
box, I swear smoke came out. Being on top of a pub does lend the place some,
ummm, character.......

Darren Plants

----- Original Message -----
From: "Denny Anspach" <danspach@...>

Yes, you will not believe Zientek's Hobby Shop/Tavern until you see
and visit it. It is "pure Chicago", as is its slightly gritty
neighborhood. If you are visiting UC (University of Chicago, not
California!), then this would be your best bet because it is already
on the South Side.

Well worth the visit!


Denny (a former UC student!)


NYC box car ID help

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

oops - missed the url to the photo. Its under the name box cars/4 box cars in the files section of the STMFPH list at:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFPH/files/

Rob Kirkham


NYC box car ID help

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

Given all the discussion on NYC cars this today, perhaps its a good time to ask if the four non-CPR cars in this detail can be identified. The photo was taken in the fall of 1952 on the CPR main in B.C. Using the gondola as a guide, the car ahead (gon+1) is CPR. The next car (Gon =2) I would guess is NYC. The next car forward (Gon +3), I don't know. Moving backward from the gon, another NYC (gon -1) and then another unknown to me (gon -2).

So the usual questions if these photos allow identification:

car / line / number series / modelling info and on line photos
Gon +3 u/k u/k u/k
Gon+2 NYC? U/k u/k
Gon -1 NYC? U/k u/k
Gon -2 u/k u/k u/k

Thanks in advance for any help you can offer.

Rob Kirkham


speaking of distinctive Pennsy cars..... the H33

D. Scott Chatfield
 

I've had an itch to kitbash a Pennsy H33 out of a Bowser or Kato 1,958cf covered hopper ever since the "paint schemes of the Pennsy's covered hoppers" issue of "The Keystone" came out. These were basically copies of the 1,958cf design except they were welded and had evenly spaced hatches, etc. Built circa 1953 just before P-S intruduced the all-welded PS-2/2003 in 1954, of which Pennsy was one of the first buyers, their H34 class. I gather they were among the first general-service covered hopper fleets to come with roller bearing trucks. Is this correct?

Anyone built one of these yet? My abuilding H30 will need company. Seems to be fairly straightfoward: Make a new roof using DA square hatches. Slap a comparitively tall end sheet over the end bracing. What is the size of the side stakes? Am I going to have to shave off all the stakes on a Bowser body? Sit it on Athearn-Genesis's "70-ton" roller bearing trucks with the rotating bearing caps. Paint it Freight Car Color (probably the more brownish shade, not iron oxide), and weather to taste. Not much here, since the layout it will run on is set in western Pennsylvania in 1954-55.

Thoughts?

Scott C


Re: Digest Number 2297

golden1014
 

Bill!

This is good news! Could you be a little more specific
about which type B5 is displayed? Is it a composite
car or one of the steel rebuilds? I didn't know that
any still existed. Please take a photo and post it to
the site or please send me a copy off-line at
Golden1014@.... Thanks for the heads-up.

John

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL
************

Message: 2
Date: Mon, 14 Feb 2005 22:25:12 -0000
From: "Bill McCoy" <bugsy451@...>
Subject: SAL B-5 and '32 ARA Box cars


Just north of Myrtle Beach, SC on US17 there is a rail
oriented
resturant using SAL B-5's and ARA'32 boxcars. While
the exteriors
have had windows cut in them the mechanicals all see
to be there.
I'll send to photos the pictures I took. It's looked
like a going
operation so hopefully they are still there for
measurements etc.

Bill McCoy
Jax


=====
John Golden
O'Fallon, IL
http://www.pbase.com/golden1014


Re: NYC "USRA" Boxcars - How Many is Enough?

Richard Hendrickson
 

Re Mike Brock's dictum on the distribution of NP box cars, Tim Gilbert writes:

And in a 1947 Wheel Report between Laramie and Rawlins, there were
exactly 12 NP Boxcars in a population of 771 boxcars about 26 less than
the Brockian Hypothesis.
No fair, Tim. If you keep introducing concrete evidence instead of airy
speculation, not only Mike Brock's hypotheses but most of the others
advanced on this list will be shot down in flames. Stop spoiling our fun!

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


The Fifth Rule

Mike Brock <brockm@...>
 

Tim Gilbert says:


And in a 1947 Wheel Report between Laramie and Rawlins, there were
exactly 12 NP Boxcars in a population of 771 boxcars about 26 less than
the Brockian Hypothesis.
No, no, no...Tim. The rule does not state that for every 20 box cars there shall be at least one NP box car.....771/20 = 38.5...or 26.5 more than the 12. It DOES state that for every frt train...excluding reefer blocks, coal drags and oil trains...of over 20 cars [ and UP trains probably averaged about 65 cars during that time period ], at least one NP box car would be present. I have no idea how many trains you have in your data that fit this scenario but, if you have over 20, you can expect a summons to explain this failure to the Prototype Police at Prototype Rails in Cocoa Beach, FL next Jan 5-8. And...at that time...with luck...I'll have copies of MY conductor's book ready for your analysis...assuming that you are able to convince the PR Police of your innocence...not a sure thing when you consider the jury <g>....Thompson, Aley, Martin, Smith, Switzer, Hom [ scary ], Anspach, Culotta, Hinman, Westerfield, Kline and, hopefully, Hendrickson. Twelve angry men? I dunno, but I'm sure glad I won't have to be brought before such a group.<g>.

Care to reconsider?

Mike Brock


Re: X29 NYC USRA Box Cars

Richard Hendrickson
 

Greg Martin writes, about Pennsy roofs:

Yea, but Richard they were so good looking you just ignore them and so
many of them as well... And Damn the shipper plug that hole with chewing
gum and quit whinning... ! #^)
"Damn the shipper and quit whining." Wasn't that the slogan that replaced
"Standard Railroad of the World" in later years?

Richard H. Hendrickson
Ashland, Oregon 97520


Re: Off-line cars [Was: NYC "USRA" Boxcars - How Many . . .]

Tim Gilbert <tgilbert@...>
 

Anthony Thompson wrote:

For those on the list interested in wheel reports, I have just
gotten a copy of an Excel version of a very interesting and complete
set of pages from a 1901 SP conductor's book. This is a little early
for many on this list, but is interesting to me largely because there
are so FEW off-line cars listed in trains.
Tony,

Where on the SP did this wheel report report? Can you provide a breakdown of the car types - boxes, gons, flats, stock cars, reefers, etc.?

Tim Gilbert


Re: PRR X29s & NYC USRA Box Cars

armprem
 

Sorry Ben,my thought was in reference to the availability of Pennsy box
car kits other than the X29.In fact, I have more X29s than all other PRR box
cars on my roster.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
From: "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 15, 2005 4:48 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: PRR X29s & NYC USRA Box Cars




Armand Premo wrote:
IMHO there are far too few Pennsy steel Box Cars other than the
X29s. For what it's worth.

In what context? Available kits? Layout representation?

I don't buy your argument from a model railroad fleet perspective.
The X29 made up over 40% of the PRR general service boxcar fleet in
1950 (approximately 25,000 X29, approximately 60,000 total PRR XM).
Because of its low height, it's instantly recognizable as a Pennsy
boxcar, making it a "signature car" as well. I do agree with you
that for the other 60%, you can use more variety as the other steel
boxcar classes are, for the most part, much smaller, but any way you
slice it, the X29 should be your most numerous PRR boxcar on your
layout, no matter what North American standard gauge railroad you
model.


Ben Hom







Yahoo! Groups Links






158321 - 158340 of 196997