Date   

Re: New file uploaded to STMFC

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Dec 7, 2004, at 10:37 AM, dti_nut wrote:


Can aunyone ID this truck which was found under the following DT&I
series:

14000-14199 built by ACF
14200-14299 same

Is there a model of this available in HO - if so by who?

Thanks
Brian Everett
Modeling the DT&I of the 60's & 70's

>   File        : /DTI_spring_coil_truck.jpg
>   Uploaded by : dti_nut <Brian_Everett@d...>
>   Description : Can someone ID this truck?? Is there a similar model
of this in HO Scale?
Brian:

It is a coil-elliptic truck. As the name implies, it uses a
combination of coil and elliptic springs. They experienced moderate
adoption in the 1930s as buyers of freight equipment sought improved
riding qualities for trucks.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912


Re: New file uploaded to STMFC

Brian Everett
 

Can aunyone ID this truck which was found under the following DT&I series:

14000-14199 built by ACF
14200-14299 same

Is there a model of this available in HO - if so by who?

Thanks
Brian Everett
Modeling the DT&I of the 60's & 70's

File : /DTI_spring_coil_truck.jpg
Uploaded by : dti_nut <Brian_Everett@d...>
Description : Can someone ID this truck?? Is there a similar model
of this in HO Scale?


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.

File : /DTI_spring_coil_truck.jpg
Uploaded by : dti_nut <Brian_Everett@...>
Description : Can someone ID this truck?? Is there a similar model of this in HO Scale?

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/DTI_spring_coil_truck.jpg

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/help/us/groups/files

Regards,

dti_nut <Brian_Everett@...>


updated New England Rail Service newsletter

Eric Hansmann <ehansmann@...>
 

Current details on the Dominion Car project at New England Rail
Services are now posted on their newsletter:
http://www.newenglandrail.com/newsletter.htm

Also note an upcoming General American-Pflauder milk car kit.

Eric Hansmann
Morgantown, W. Va.


Re: A Different Kind of Resin Rut

buchwaldfam <duff@...>
 

Nothing but talc went out of here on good old steam era Rutland
double sheathed wood box cars! I have a picture of RUT 7999 and it
seems to have some sort of fungus growing on the walls.....
Update in the resin saga: I spoke with the help desk at MM and
he asked what I was mixing the resin in. Yup, waxed Dixie cups. Got
some plastic cups last night and did a pour... works great! (Dummie
me, dummie me....)

Thanks for the pointers everyone!

Regards,
Phil Buchwald

--- In STMFC@..., "Schuyler Larrabee"
<schuyler.larrabee@v...> wrote:


-----Original Message-----
From: Charles Morrill [mailto:badlands@n...]
The solution is Johnson
& Johnson unmedicated baby powder.
There's two (or more) kinds, not including the Aloe impregnated
kind.

There's talc, and there's corn starch, both sold as 'Baby
Powder." Which are
you referencing.



BTW, I have found that the corn starch kind is NOT good if your
sample baby has
a fungus problem. The corn starch (which may well have been
shipped in steam
era freight cars) serves as FOOD for the fungus. Took weeks to
figure that out.

SGL


Resin rut discussion brings an offer for FAQ/FACTS

milepost131 <mp131@...>
 

It would seem that the resin discussion has raised some interesting
discussion.

I have an offer:

Many of us work with resin or are thinking about it (model railroad
related). I would be happy to compile a FAQ/FACT sheet that could be
posted on the site summarizing some of the information. If you would
like to participate here are the bare bones questions I think might be
helpful. Anything else you can think of I'll be glad to add. For the
sake of the group PLEASE SEND YOUR RESPONSES TO ME DIRECTLY at
ghandrews@.... I PROMISE TO compile the answers received and
post them to the group site AND let the group know when the document
is ready. If you would like me to send the material DIRECTLY to you
please send an EMAIL to ghandrews@... with "CASTING
INFORMATION STMFC" in the subject.

Please feel free to use this posting for cut and paste purposes of
answering the questions.

Right now I would say that the compilation would be sometime in
January after the holidays. Depending on the responses I might send
this note out again before January. If you have additional questions
that you'd like answers to please send them to me (SUBJECT: Additional
casting questions STMFC) and I will add them.

Thank you for your participation.

Gordon Andrews

MOLDS

What material do you favor for molds:_____ Manufacturer____ specific
brand or type______ source

WHY?

What other materials have you tried and why do you NOT use them?

What have YOU found to be the shelf life of this material(s):


What techniques and hints have you developed to work with this material:

What do you use to make masters and what type of mold release do you use:

MOLDING PROCESS:

Do you use a vacuum pump?
Do you mix according to directions:
Do you "coat the master and then pour additional material?

How much if any overhang of the master (inches or mm) do you allow on
your masters?


Do you make flat molds, two part molds, multipart molds?

How do you store your molds between use?



"RESIN MATERIALS etc:

What type of resin (or other) material do you find most suitable for
your needs: Manufacturer type and source:

What have you found is the shelf life of this material?

What techniques ands hints can you offer when working with this material?

What type of mold release do you use?

Do you use a pressure pot?

What techniques are you exploring to make the casting process better?

How do you deal with the smell of materials?


Re: BAR 2901 "State of Maine" reefers

benjaminfrank_hom <b.hom@...>
 

Steve Solombrino wrote:
"I wasn't considering the BAR kit. I was considering the 6670 series
CN ARA box cars."

I'm sorry - my mental telepathy has been acting up lately. ;-)

Definitely a better start. The roof will need to be replaced - the
BAR car looks to have an 11-carline Hutchins roof vs. the 13-
carlines of the CN car. Westerfield makes one for his #3813 DL&W
USRA DS boxcar - it'll have to be narrowed to fit. The ends need
replacing as well, though a source for the 7/7 Murphy ends for a SS
boxcar doesn't immediately come to mind. You could possibly cut
down a pair of Tichy 7/8 or 5/5/5 Murphy ends. The door will be a
pain in the ass as it's cast on the car side.

My point is that when you resin bash, you don't necessarily have to
accept incorrect ends, roofs, or underframes. It's far easier to
interchange these parts with flat kits, though you do have to do a
little thinking ahead to make sure everything goes together. See
Clark Propst's M&StL SS boxcar resin bash from a Funaro B&M XM-1 in
Speedwitch Publishing's upcoming Prototype Railroad Modeling Journal
to see what I mean.
http://www.speedwitch.com/Journal.htm


Ben Hom


Re: Sunshine's vinegar car

pierreoliver2003 <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Many thanks to those of you who've posted on this subject. I've now
got or will be recieving soon a wealth of information to assist me in
my efforts.
Once the model is built I'll post a photo on my website for all of
you to enjoy.
This list rocks!
Pierre Oliver
http://www.elgincarshops.com/


Re: BAR 2901 "State of Maine" reefers

up4479
 

--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@w...> wrote:

Steve Solombrino wrote:
http://photos.imageevent.com/up4479/trains/websize/bar2901.JPG
"I think there is a F&C kit that is a good starting point for a good
stand-in model (good enough at 3 feet, IMO). I have the decals.
Some day."

The F&C kit won't even give you that, as it models the BAR 61000-
61999 series SS Pratt truss boxcar:
http://www.walthers.com/exec/productinfo/279-6550

Ben Hom

I wasn't considering the BAR kit. I was considering the 6670 series
CN ARA box cars.
Steve Solombrino


Re: Sunshine's vinegar car

Thomas M. Olsen <tmolsen@...>
 

Ted,

Did you see Bill Darnaby's post back in the summer regarding his
experiences building this kit? I have just sent a copy to Pierre so
that he can see what Bill did.

Tom Olsen
7 Boundary Road, West Branch
Newark, Delaware, 19711-7479
(302) 738-4292
tmolsen@...

Ted Culotta wrote:

On Dec 5, 2004, at 2:07 PM, pierreoliver2003 wrote:



List,
I'm about to commence building one of Sunshine's vinegar cars. I was
wondering if anyone had any advice/warnings about this kit. I like to
see the speed bumps before I hit them.

Pierre:

I am just finishing construction on mine and there are two things that
I would recommend, besides just taking your time. The first is that in
a effort to make a solid, true tank, I "squared" up the edges that are
glued together to form the bottom of the tank. This involved filing
off material until those edges would come together along a clean,
square adjacent surface, as opposed to merely touching. Either I
removed a LOT of material (I don't think I removed that much) or the
variances in the casting process produced a tank that is not of great
enough diameter to abut against all the tank saddles, once placed in
the saddles. If I were doing it again, I would remove almost nothing
when forming the tank and go for the maximum tank diameter. The second
thing, and it's small, is that the instructions do not tell you that
the "thin cast strip with large bolt heads on either end" that "fits
into the top horizontal channel of the end frames" does have a correct
and incorrect orientation. Those large bolt heads should angle
upwards. Look at the parts and you'll see what I mean.

There is a lot of variation in this kit that makes it a little
"sloppier" than I'd generally like. However, the overall effect of the
model, which is really quite striking as I am sure you have gathered,
renders most of the these little imperfections moot. I already know
it's one of those models I will continue to enjoy for years, because it
embodies everything that makes kit building so satisfying.

Regards,
Ted Culotta

Speedwitch Media
100 14th Avenue, San Mateo, CA 94402
info@...
www.speedwitch.com
(650) 787-1912





Yahoo! Groups Links








Re: A Different Kind of Resin Rut

Charles Morrill <badlands@...>
 

I used the Talc version.
Charlie

----- Original Message -----
From: "Schuyler Larrabee" <schuyler.larrabee@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Monday, December 06, 2004 7:45 PM
Subject: RE: [STMFC] A Different Kind of Resin Rut





-----Original Message-----
From: Charles Morrill [mailto:badlands@...]
The solution is Johnson
& Johnson unmedicated baby powder.
There's two (or more) kinds, not including the Aloe impregnated kind.

There's talc, and there's corn starch, both sold as 'Baby Powder." Which are
you referencing.



BTW, I have found that the corn starch kind is NOT good if your sample baby has
a fungus problem. The corn starch (which may well have been shipped in steam
era freight cars) serves as FOOD for the fungus. Took weeks to figure that out.

SGL





Yahoo! Groups Links









B. Darnaby's Vinegar Car - Here's the write-up...

Paul Gehrett
 

Hi Folks,

Found it in the archives. Hope this helps.

Paul Gehrett

--- In STMFC@..., "Bill Darnaby" <WDarnaby@w...> wrote:
I recently finished assembling a Sunshine vinegar car, kit 60.3. This kit
is of the Standard Brands wooden horizontal tank vinegar car. The
instructions are printed on the usual, for Sunshine, glossy paper with in
process photos and completed model photos. In addition, there is a
prototype
data sheet of in service cars from the1930's through the 1960's and some
museum
cars. Finally, there is a supplement sheet with close up photos of a museum
car. The decals were printed by Rail Graphic and are of the usual high
quality. The resin is the usual easy to work with gray resin.
This kit has a lot parts. First the tank wrapper is preformed into a
cylinder very close to the final diameter. This was done after the wrapper
was taken from the flat mold and formed while it was still soft. The
wrapper is around .040" thick and has excellent wood stave detail. Although
it was formed into a cylinder the areas near the two edges to be joined to
form the completed cylinder
tended to be straight which made less than a perfect circle when joined. I
sprung the edges apart and inserted a professional grade emery board between
and worked it back and forth to prep the edges for bonding with CA but found
it difficult to force the wrapper into perfect circle because of the
straight areas near the joint. This was solved by cutting a one inch wide
strip of 1/32 of lead to the length of the tank less end pieces and forming
the lead into and arc along its length using and old broom handle as a form.
The lead surface and interior of the wrapper were roughed up with sandpaper
for "bite" and the wrapper attached to the lead with CA while both were
formed over the handle. This forced the wrapper into a good circle and
added necessary weight to the tank. Now, the instructions say the wrapper
is sized to the exact diameter and that the finished tank diameter should be
7' 6" or less. I took them for their word on this as the final tank
diameter is difficult to judge from the unjoined wrapper but I ended up with
a tank of 7' 9". This larger diameter causes problems later in assembly and
the modeler should make the effort to get this correct. I should have made
more passes with the emery board along the joint. The tank ends are cast
oversize and the modeler has to take care in sizing them to fit inside the
tank so that the vertical end braces are centered in the tank from side to
side and that the end braces line up from end to end after installation.
The tank has at least 28 support hoops and the kit provides cast resin
turnbuckles and .015 brass wire to create the hoops. Applying these was
very remenisent of building the wood water tanks for my layout. Taking a
cue from that project I found it much easier to substitute .013 monofilament
fishing line for the wire. I would insert the line into a hole drilled in
the turnbuckle, attach it with CA, hold the turnbuckle on the tank, wrap the
line around the tank, cut the line with a bit of overlap past the turnbuckle
and insert and attach with CA the loose end of the line into the other hole
in the turnbuckle.
The underframe is a nice one piece resin casting that includes all sills and
crossbearers. Resin molding has progressed over the years to where flanges
and channels can be cast undercut and open and this underframe is a fine
example. The only flaws were found in the side sills which are C channels
facing inwards. Some of these had started to fill in as castings made
previous to mine had torn away the rubber mold material causing resin
impressions of the torn mold pieces to remain in the channels of my casting.
I was able to clean these out with a modeling knife.
There are 3 types of tank supports or saddles that are attached to the
underframe and the instructions recommend attaching the end saddles to the
underframe and sanding to fit the tank diameter by wrapping sandpaper around
the tank. The first difficulty my oversize tank caused was in the fitup of
the end saddles to the tank. The extra 3" caused the tank to be too large
for the saddles and the sanding operation for a good fit up caused all of
the simulated cast wood saddle blocks to be removed. I ended up sanding all
of the wood blocks away, down to the "metal" frame, and I had to add new
blocks made from .010 styrene. The instructions say to mount the end
saddles in the center of the underframe but I found this hard to judge
without having the tank in the saddle. I would recommend sanding the end
saddles to fit the tank diameter as loose pieces and then use the tank as an
aid to attaching them to the center of the underframe.
The tank end supports are nice castings with simulated vertical H beams that
are supposed to line up with vertical wood beams on the tank ends. The
result will be disappointing if the modeler doesn't take care to making the
tank ends centered in the tank, the tank centered on the underframe and the
tank end support centered on the underframe. The instructions say to add
the coupler box after all of the tank saddles are in place. I would
recommend that the couple box be added to the underframe just after the tank
end saddles so the bolster and coupler screws holes can be conveniently
drilled and tapped. Otherwise, the coupler box hole drilling will get into
the tank end support structure.
One of the neat details of the car is the large cross bracing to support the
tank. These are fabricated out of resin casings, styrene turnbuckles and
.025 styrene rod. The instructions say the lower ends of these fit into
holes in the bolsters but I did not find and had to drill my own. The upper
end fit into holes drilled into the back of the tank end frame support in
line with cast bolt heads on the opposite sides to simulate the nuts at the
ends of the bracing. Here is the other issue I ran into with the fat tank
as I had to drill the hole a little outboard of the bolt heads to clear the
tank diameter. One thing to note even if the modeler gets the tank diameter
correct. The instructions recommend building and painting the frame
assembly and tank as separate components because of all of the surfaces to
paint and then assembling after. However, if the tank cross braces are
fastened to the upper portions of the tank end frame with CA in line with
the cast bolt detail the tank cannot be installed. I therefore left the
upper ends of the cross braces loose in their holes so they could be popped
in and out for tank removal/installation. One complaint is that the
instructions call for the application of a discharge pipe at the bottom of
the tank but provide no clue or photo as to where it goes.
As mentioned, the kit comes with many resin detail parts and the kit even
includes a plastic bag just for their safe storage after removal and cleanup
from the resin sprues. All of the casting deatil is clean and neatly done.
The brake detail consists of a Bowser AB part sprue and etched brake levers.
The kit demands a lot of attention as so many things have to line up
correctly for a balanced appearance. This kit is not for the faint of heart
and required three times the effort that a simple boxcar would have
required. However, it builds into a really neat car.
Bill Darnaby
--- End forwarded message ---


Re: A Different Kind of Resin Rut

Schuyler Larrabee
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Charles Morrill [mailto:badlands@...]
The solution is Johnson
& Johnson unmedicated baby powder.
There's two (or more) kinds, not including the Aloe impregnated kind.

There's talc, and there's corn starch, both sold as 'Baby Powder." Which are
you referencing.



BTW, I have found that the corn starch kind is NOT good if your sample baby has
a fungus problem. The corn starch (which may well have been shipped in steam
era freight cars) serves as FOOD for the fungus. Took weeks to figure that out.

SGL


Re: A Different Kind of Resin Rut

Brian Everett
 

Something I have found to be helpful, is when casting flat parts sucha
as doors - etc... is I only mix up enough to do the casting + 5-10% extra.

I mix the 2 parts well, pour into mold, and then use a toothpick and I
run it around the edges of the mold, or into any cavities where I
think air may be trapped to help get resin into the area, and release
air pockets. After wards, I level off the mold carfully, as to not
introduce new air pockets to the casting.

I have done this, and 90% of the time, I get good results.

I have only used Baby powder when I first started, and now, do not
bother. If you were making a whole carbody, this may be more
important, but for smaller flat castings, I don't feel it's required.

Regards,
Brian Everett

--- In STMFC@..., "Charles Morrill" <badlands@n...> wrote:
Phil,
I ran into the bubble problem when doing sides etc. for an O scale
caboose
with the MM furnished resin. I tried another brand of resin with
the same
result. There is some kind of chemical action going on between the
RTV and
resin which is generating a gas. Moisture is often blamed and
perhaps the
RTV is drawing moisture from the air. The solution is Johnson & Johnson
unmedicated baby powder. Do not use mold release. Instead, coat
the mold
with the baby powder and then tap to shake out all but a very thin
coating
of the powder.
Charlie

----- Original Message -----
From: "buchwaldfam" <duff@g...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 05, 2004 7:29 PM
Subject: [STMFC] A Different Kind of Resin Rut




Gentlemen,

I have been trying unsuccessfully to cast some car sides, ends,
and roofs using Micro-Mark CR-600 resin. The stuff wets out the mold
well and has no visible air bubbles when first poured. Then it all
goes down hill.
First attempt, many bubbles formed after the resin was sitting in
the mold for a few minutes. The resulting castings crumbled when I
tried to de-mold them. The pieces that were large enough to see a flat
panel on were dimpled like the hood of a car which was left out in a
hail storm. The second attempt using warmed molds, and a third attempt
using a sample of resin which was baked prior to mixing ( to try to
remove any absorbed moisture.... taking a clue from the bubbles and
pourous finished product) per a suggestion on Alumalite's site, and
skipping the mold release after cleaning the molds, gave as bad or
worse results. Upon curing (or whatever you want to call the post-mix
results), the resin separates into a hard, crumbly portion and an oily
liquid portion.
Does anyone have any pointers for me? Or is this possibly just
bad material. If so, what other material do you recommend. I purchased
this stuff only because it was readily available through the mail and
I don't have a local supplier of urethane resin.

Thanks for any words of advice!

Best regards,
Phil Buchwald


Re: A Different Kind of Resin Rut

Manfred Lorenz
 

--- In STMFC@..., "dti_nut" <Brian_Everett@d...> wrote:

Phil,
...the kit includes:

1to1 rubber
1to1 resin
mold release
mixing cups/stirs
kleenklay
I have seen a product that is an additive which helps bubble release.

Manfred
Bonn


Re: A Different Kind of Resin Rut

Brian Everett
 

Phil,

I got a resin kit from MicroMark about 4-5 years ago.
The 1to1 Rubber (A)is just about crapped out, and is like molasses now.
The casting resin though, is still very useable, and is making great
castings.

FWIW, I have had good luck with the MM stuff, and would suggest giving
it a try. I'd say that it's normal shelf life is probably about 3
years, but conditions of storage may affect this. the kit includes:

1to1 rubber
1to1 resin
mold release
mixing cups/stirs
kleenklay

cost about 60 bucks with shipping

Regards,
Brian Everett


Re: [FC] BAR "State of Maine" reefers

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Manfred Lorenz wrote:
This is not a reefer but a flat car:
http://tinyurl.com/6no7z

Is there a prototype for it?
Manfred, many times these "Huge Fruits and Vegetables" postcards, popular in the early 20th century, were made from actual photos of early freight cars, making them of some value in documenting cars--if not entirely accurate for the potatoes, etc. But this one does not LOOK like an actual car (would need to see more to be sure). I leave it to you to judge the potato.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2942 Linden Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: [FC] BAR "State of Maine" reefers

Manfred Lorenz
 

This is not a reefer but a flat car:
http://tinyurl.com/6no7z

Is there a prototype for it?

At least I saw a giant potatoe on the way to the skiing slopes in
Idaho just to the west of the Tetons.

Manfred
Bonn


Re: P-S gondola end source

Tim O'Connor
 

It sure would be nice if Stan did this as a Detail Part! :o)

Is there a commercial source in HO for the drop end gondola door with
Pullman-Standard style straight corrugations?

The P2K 'Greenville' cars that were made a few years ago had two different
door styles that were both dreadnought style. However several of the
prototypes that had been been built by P-S actually had the proprietary
three-rib style end door. At least RI and SLSF had cars with this style
of door.

These cars were covered in RMJ, January and November 1996.

Ron Merrick


P-S gondola end source

mopacfirst
 

Is there a commercial source in HO for the drop end gondola door with
Pullman-Standard style straight corrugations?

The P2K 'Greenville' cars that were made a few years ago had two different
door styles that were both dreadnought style. However several of the
prototypes that had been been built by P-S actually had the proprietary
three-rib style end door. At least RI and SLSF had cars with this style
of door.

These cars were covered in RMJ, January and November 1996.

Ron Merrick

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The information transmitted is intended only for the person
or entity to which it is addressed and may contain proprietary,
business-confidential and/or privileged material.
If you are not the intended recipient of this message you
are hereby notified that any use, review, retransmission,
dissemination, distribution, reproduction or any action taken
in reliance upon this message is prohibited. If you received
this in error, please contact the sender and delete the
material from any computer. Any views expressed in this message
are those of the individual sender and may not necessarily reflect
the views of the company.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

162341 - 162360 of 198533