Date   

Re: a possible BIG change is Yahoo Groups

Garth Groff <ggg9y@...>
 

Friends,

Since I receive all my e-mail through the University, if Yahoo imposes charges, I will be frozen out.

Kind regards,


Garth G. Groff

Andy Harman wrote:


The problem I see with paying for Yahoo groups (as a subscriber) is that on
day one, you can kiss 50% of your membership goodbye . . . .


Basic Skills

Rob Kirkham <rdkirkham@...>
 

I think this idea would be appealling - especially if at a B & B kind of
place - somewhere remote and scenic - but equipped with a great shop, with
metal working equipment, stores of styrene and brass sheet and shapes, rivet
modelling tools, etching equipment, CAD software equipped computers,
drawings tables, maybe even lazer cutting tables, libraries of drawings,
spray booths, freight car parts, etc, etc. The kind of place you could go
with a project in mind, and with advance planning the friendly staff would
ensure the materials required were in stock, and an instructer for the
techniques required would be in attendance, & drawings were already in the
computer ready to go, etc. So you could show up and scratch build
something over the course of a couple of intense days and develop some
skills and use equipment you might not be able to access at home.

Rob Kirkham


Re: NC&StL boxcar alive and well in 2004

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

The XM 32 cars had an outside length of 38' according the 1955 ORER. Numbered in series, 20,000-21,399. Garrett are you sure that the number series you posted originally is correct as it doesn't match my 1955 ORER or Freight Car Journal No. 63.

The NC&STL didn't always put class numbers on the sides of boxcars, some go XM_##, some just XM. I have never been able to determine a rhyme or reason to this practice. When used they appeared on the right side of the car near the bolster.

BTW Freight Cars Journal No. 63 is very useful. Is the Society of Freight car Historians still around?

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY


Re: Casting Resins

Jim or Lisa Hayes <jim-and-lisa@...>
 

Sounds just like one of the early Sunshine kits #2.1 - 2.6 - "CNW, CMO, RI
steel side rebuilds of USRA double sheathed boxcars" originally issued in
1989 and discontinued long ago. My kit #2.2 is almost ready for paint.<G>

Jim Hayes
Portland OR


I've got the patterns and molds done for a CNW/CMO steel side USRA
rebuilt box car. I plan on making several of these, therefore the
molds.
-


Re: TAN Re: Basic Skills

Brian J Carlson <brian@...>
 

RPM meets often have seminars which provide basic skills for some topics, such as airbrushing, or resin casting.

Brian J Carlson P.E.
Cheektowaga NY

----- Original Message -----
From: Charlie Vlk
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, September 05, 2004 11:49 PM
Subject: Re: TAN Re: [STMFC] Basic Skills


I wasn't thinking of LHS classes (if yours has enough space for a classroom
they are blessed) but rather a get away with the wife and have a little
vacation sort of thing..... Yes, many quilt stores offer classes as an
adjunct to their retail sales, but I was thinking of something more
independent and not associated with a hobby shop.
Charlie Vlk



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Re: TAN Re: Basic Skills

Charlie Vlk
 

I wasn't thinking of LHS classes (if yours has enough space for a classroom
they are blessed) but rather a get away with the wife and have a little
vacation sort of thing..... Yes, many quilt stores offer classes as an
adjunct to their retail sales, but I was thinking of something more
independent and not associated with a hobby shop.
Charlie Vlk


Casting Resins

buchwaldfam <buchwaldfam@...>
 

I've got the patterns and molds done for a CNW/CMO steel side USRA
rebuilt box car. I plan on making several of these, therefore the
molds.

OK, so now I'm about ready to pour resin. I've got some clear
polyester casting resin from the local craft store. I'm going to
make a couple of pours to see how the molds work.

Question: Is there any problem with going ahead and using this clear
resin for the "real" models? I've got an ancient Roller Bearing
Models box car kit which is clear resin. The paint has blistered and
peeled from the castings.

Question: If the clear resin is not good, what is a recommended
casting resin? I think it was mentioned here that the stuff that
Micro-Mark sells isn't so hot. (???) I'd like something flexible
such as the "styro-eurathane" resin that the professionals use, but
is that stuff safe for home use and available in quantities
appropriate for, say a half dozen models?

Thanks in advance,

Phil Buchwald


Re: Freight cars for brewery late 40's to early 50's

buchwaldfam <buchwaldfam@...>
 

The Milwaukee Road Historical Society has a book in print
titled, "The Beer Line". The subject is the "north end" operations
in Milwaukee. I believe that this would include Blatz and Pabst, as
Miller was over on 35th street. Also, Kalmbach's "The Milwaukee Road
in its Hometown" has a couple of good photos of the Beer Line
operations. Lots of box cars of grain being unloaded, and many
reefers outbound full of beer.

Regards,
Phil Buchwald

--- In STMFC@..., "wahlford" <wahlford@m...> wrote:
What type of cars would one typically find at a brewery in the
post
WWII era? What would they haul? Would reefers need to be iced
for
this service and would the brewery ice their own cars?

General info would be appreciated, but I'm specifically interested
in
Jax Brewery in New Orleans.

Saw a photo of Jax with a covered conveyor running from the beer
warehouse to a covered dock that ran between the tracks. Looked
much
like an icing dock. Was missing from 1960 Sanborn Map.

Thanks,
Michael Wahl


Re: NC&StL boxcar alive and well in 2004

buchwaldfam <buchwaldfam@...>
 

OK, so here's the first question. At the risk of seeming too lazy to
look it up myself (I paged through my magazine pile and came up with
some photos, but no "XM class #'s"), how long is this car? I've got
some broad side views of both 36' and 40' NC&StL cars, but none show
any sort of end view and none talk "class".
Thanks for the great end shots!

Regards,
Phil Buchwald


--- In STMFC@..., "Garrett W. Rea" <Garrett.Rea@w...>
wrote:
All:

I have just posted to photos on the sister list of an NC&StL
rebuilt
MX-32 boxcar that is located in here in Tennessee:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFPH/files/

Folder: NC&StL XM-32

It is in very good condition considering its age and is in decent
shape even tho it is grounded. These cars were built from SS NC
boxcars during WWII by the NC.

They were in two series, 20000-21179 and 21180-21230. The details
posted with the photos are correct for the car shown, which was in
the first series, the second differed with shaft type brakes,
Gypsum
running boards and a wood brake step. Some also had Murphy ends
supposedly.

Feel free to ask any questions, but that is about all I know about
the XM-32s, but I can put you in contact with others that know
more.

Cordially-

Garrett Rea
Nashville, TN


Re: TAN Re: Basic Skills

Ted Culotta <tculotta@...>
 

On Sep 5, 2004, at 6:53 PM, englishintroy wrote:

The difference of course is that quilters come to learn to quilt and
to make a quilt they have to buy the materials which are the shop's
bread-and-butter, whereas the hobby shop's bread-and-butter (i.e.
product of volume times profit margin) is not kits or styrene strips
but all the R-T-R cars and locomotives we love to hate.
So this begs the question, is there is big "ready-to-sleep" movement sweeping the ranks of quilting and ruining the hobby?

Running with my tongue in cheek,
Ted Culotta


Re: a possible BIG change is Yahoo Groups

Jeff English
 

--- In STMFC@..., Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@c...> wrote:

Andy,
<snip>

Also, the talk about "reduced ads" is not very confidence
inspiring.
Reduced means "temporarily reduced", and they will keep creeping
back up to
former levels. "No ads" is the only thing worth paying for.
I don't mind Yahoo's practice of placing advertsing that shows up in
its own column on the right side of the page where I'm reading the
message. As somebody else pointed out, this is, after all, no
different from ignoring a column of advertising that is of no
interest in a magazine. What bothers me a lot is the separate web
page ad that I have to click to get by, which is especially annoying
for those of us who are still on dial-up.

Jeff English
Troy, New York


TAN Re: Basic Skills

Jeff English
 

--- In STMFC@..., smithbf@v... wrote:

<snip>

Indeed, the local quilt shop in Montgomery AL has about 1/3 of its
square
footage devoted to a classroom, and there are classes every week
or so,
and sometimes multiple classes on one day. Of course, the owner
gets a
great "bounce" from the class, since all the tools, fabrics,
patterns and
books are right out front.
The difference of course is that quilters come to learn to quilt and
to make a quilt they have to buy the materials which are the shop's
bread-and-butter, whereas the hobby shop's bread-and-butter (i.e.
product of volume times profit margin) is not kits or styrene strips
but all the R-T-R cars and locomotives we love to hate.

Secondarily, the hobby is so broad that the number of individuals
interested in learning actual model building skills is small
compared to the sum of interest in all the other skills also
involved (planning, electrical/DCC, scenery techniques, operating
practices, etc.)

Jeff English
Troy, New York


WPM: Western Prototype Modelers Meet, October 10, 2004

Timothy Costello
 

STMFC List:

Here's info on WPM, the Western Prototype Modelers Meet being held on
Sunday October 10, 2004 in LaHabra (LA), CA.

The west coast's longest running and largest gathering for Prototype
Modelers now includes extended display hours, exhibitors and an expanded
clinic/seminar program!

Model Display: WPM has 4000 sq. ft. of display space for layouts, dioramas
and models. New for 2004, models will now be displayed on elevated tables.
Last years WPM event featured over 400 models on display. WPM 2004 will
feature both an N scale and an HO scale Free-mo operating modular
layouts. Bring your modeling projects, finished, or "in the works". Share
ideas & techniques with fellow modelers; meet new friends.

Clinics/Seminars: WPM 2004 will expand the programming focused on prototype
modeling
David Casdorph: International intermodal containers
Mark T. Evans: History of, and modeling coil steel cars
Elden Gatwood: The steel industry in your modeling
Dave Hussey: Modeling Santa Fe F-Units from the Highliners kit
Mike Rose: Modeling the GE U18B
Bob Smaus: Kitbashing buildings for added realism

Exhibitors: New for 2004 will be exhibitors: manufacturers, photographers
and publishers. (Exhibitors: pre-registration is required, contact WPM at
the address below.)

Historical Societies: WPM will offer free display space to promote your
historical society. Contact WPM below for display information.

La Habra Community Center: 101 W. La Habra Blvd. La Habra CA
WPM Meet admission: $15.00, or $12.00 if you bring a model(s) to display.

Model display area opens 9:00am, Seminars run from 10:00am until 5:00pm,
followed by the famous WPM raffle. This year's event has been extended by
two hours and runs through 7pm!

Updated info on speakers, program & schedule: www.WesternPrototypeModelers.org
Write: info@... or call Tim Costello at 714-832-8696


Re: a possible BIG change is Yahoo Groups

Tim O'Connor
 

Andy, answering the survey is the only way to get your
message through, as Bill Lane said when he brought up
this subject. Tell Yahoo how you feel, and what you
think is worth a fee, and what isn't.

Also, the talk about "reduced ads" is not very confidence inspiring.
Reduced means "temporarily reduced", and they will keep creeping back up to
former levels. "No ads" is the only thing worth paying for.

Andy


Re: WPM: Western Prototype Modelers Meet, October 10, 2004

eabracher@...
 

In a message dated 9/5/04 7:08:04 PM, tgcostello2@... writes:


models will now be displayed on elevated tables.
I am curious. How do you elevate the tables. We tried that and found them
to be wobbly.

eric


TAN Re: Basic Skills

smithbf@...
 

Charlie says:
My wife is a Quilter
Hey, I resemble that remark!

and they go to weekend and some week long retreats to
quilt and learn techniques.
In fact, one of the places she goes to is a sort of artist's colony on the
former estate of Jens Jensen, the famous landscape architect. The
facility offers many courses in various arts and I often wondered if
there would be
any interest in a week long seminar on Model Railroading run in
conjunction with a Quilt Retreat for the spouses......
Indeed, the local quilt shop in Montgomery AL has about 1/3 of its square
footage devoted to a classroom, and there are classes every week or so,
and sometimes multiple classes on one day. Of course, the owner gets a
great "bounce" from the class, since all the tools, fabrics, patterns and
books are right out front. The was a train shop right accross the street,
whose owner continuously complained about not being able to sell kits. I
suggested starting some classes to him, and he was interested, but he's
gone now (moved to be with family) the hobby shop is closed and the quilt
shop is going strong. So strong in fact that Tami has offered to set up
classes for interested spouses during the 2005 Southeastern Region (SER)
convention.

So here's a "model"... rather than a week long retreat, offer to run a 2-3
hour course at the LHS in "building P2K kits" or some other subject near
and dear. Start slow, since building flat kits of resin covered hoppers
may be beyond a lot of the audience, but suck 'em in. This doesn't need
NMRA support. It just needs one person willing to teach and a LHS with a
desire to alter the business model.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


Mike Brock and our Florida Friends

kenedmier@...
 

I know this is off-topic. but please keep Mike and our Florida friends in
your prayers. I know they must be on-edge not knowing what they are going to
find when they get home this week. Let's pray that all are safe and their
homes (and layouts) are all fine.

Thanks,

Ken Edmier


Re: Seminar (was: "skills to pay the bills")

Garrett W. Rea <Garrett.Rea@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Charlie Vlk" <cvlk@c...> wrote:
I often wondered if there would be
any interest in a week long seminar on Model Railroading.....

Charlie Vlk
As long as there is not the "obligatory" swap meet with guys selling
T-Shirts & Tyco, where do I sign?

Garrett Rea
Nashville, TN


Re: a possible BIG change is Yahoo Groups

pullmanboss <tgmadden@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., Andy Harman <andy10@g...> wrote:
At 03:08 PM 9/4/2004 -0700, you wrote:

Bill, considering the value of this (and other) Yahoo groups
to me, I am willing to pay for it.
The problem I see with paying for Yahoo groups (as a subscriber)
is that on
day one, you can kiss 50% of your membership goodbye. That greatly
diminishes the value of the group, which the others are now paying
for.

Also, the talk about "reduced ads" is not very confidence
inspiring.
Reduced means "temporarily reduced", and they will keep creeping
back up to
former levels. "No ads" is the only thing worth paying for.

Andy
When the Passenger Car List moved to eGroups the List Owner could
pay a modest fee (I think it was $35 or $50) to have the group
completely ad-free for 12 months. That seemed reasonable, so I
immediately paid it. Yahoo absorbed eGroups a few months later and
honored eGroups policies until the 12 months ran out, but would not
let me renew. I haven't looked at the questionaire yet but would
have no problem paying a similar fee on behalf of the PCL.

I have ad-blocker software so don't see the Yahoo ads. Still have to
click <Continue> to get to the messages when reading them on the web
site, but the ads aren't there. That's the conundrum - we want all
this great stuff for free, then block the ads that support
the "free" stuff. I'm not a big Yahoo booster, but it's not a
charity.

Tom Madden


Re: Freight cars for brewery late 40's to early 50's

Norman+Laraine Larkin <lono@...>
 

Back sometime in the 1980s, Mike Schafer published a Kalmbach book on track plans that included a brief history of the Milwaukee Road's Beer Line. The article was detailed enough to give an overall picture of operations, and it included a table of cars used by breweries by product and era. Not sure if the info is currently available from Kalmbach, but in summary for late 40s-early 50s:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Inbound
1)Malt, Barley, rice 40' wood 40' steel boxcars
2)Hops 40' wood 40' steel reefers
3)Corn Grits ------------ 40' steel box
4)coal 40'wood/steel 40' steel hopper
5)oil 40' tank car 40' tank car
6)New bottles, caps, 40' wood box 40'/50' steel box
and kegs
7)Cans 40' wood box --trucks--
8)Reuseable kegs and bottles To brewery in cars that shipped beer to wholesaler

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Outbound
1)Beer 40' wood reefers/box cars 40'steel reefers/box cars
2)Spent grain 40' wood box car 40' wood/steel box car
3)Crushed cans 40' gondolas 40' gondolas
4) Cullet (crushed glass0 40' hoppers 40'hoppers

Hope this helps
Norm Larkin

----- Original Message -----
From: Armand Premo
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 10:52 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Freight cars for brewery late 40's to early 50's


SLRX shipped Bud.A
----- Original Message -----
From: <smithbf@...>
To: <STMFC@...>
Sent: Saturday, September 04, 2004 10:25 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Freight cars for brewery late 40's to early 50's


> Michael asks:
> >
> > What type of cars would one typically find at a brewery in the post
> > WWII era? What would they haul? Would reefers need to be iced for
> > this service and would the brewery ice their own cars?
>
> Michael,
>
> Having just spent the afternoon helping my better half through her first
> all-grain brew (a Belgian ale) I feel I must comment. The concept that
> beer must be shipped and stored cold is a figment of a more modern
> marketing man's imagination. While it is true that lager beer should be
> handled chilled, the vast majority of beer consumed in the post WWII years
> would have been ales (or fermented with Ale yeast, such as porters, stouts
> and the like). These beers are fermented at room temperature, and are not
> harmed by long term storage at room temperature. Indeed, the need to
> "filter" beer is ALSO a modern marketing invention, as beer at that time
> would have been bottle or keg primed, requiring live yeast and
> fermentation to generate the needed CO2.
>
> Reefers may well have been the car of choice to ship beer, but they were
> most often being used as an insulated boxcar. The idea was to protect the
> beer from temperature fluctuations and not to refrigerate the beer. In
> fact, refrigerating the beer would have compounded distribution issues as
> once chilled, beer should not be allowed to come back to room temperature
> (hence the need to ship lagers chilled since they are fermented chilled).
>
> Having consumed a 2 year old, unfiltered, unpasteurized, unrefrigerated
> Russian Imperial Stout (of my own brewing) this afternoon, I can happily
> confirm that Real Beer does not have "born on dating" <VBG>
>
> Regards
> Bruce
>
> Bruce Smith
> Auburn, AL
>
>
>
>
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>


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------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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b.. To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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