Date   

Re: Details On The Road

Kemal Mumcu
 

How do you flatten the wire? Hammer? Pliers?

Colin Meikle


Re: Details On The Road

Gary Ray
 

Great use of time.  Looks great.

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael Gross
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 4:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road

 

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA




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Re: Details On The Road

Nelson Moyer
 

Very nice door handles, Michael.  Hope to see you in Collinsville.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Michael Gross
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 6:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road

 

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


Re: Details On The Road

Tim O'Connor
 


Nice idea! What brand of .008 brass wire did you use? I didn't even know it was
possible to do that. Those look great! I can think of a number of uses for flattened
brass wire of that size. :-)

Tim O'Connor


On 4/25/2019 7:03 PM, Michael Gross wrote:
Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA

Attachments:


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Details On The Road

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Michael,
 
Nice work!  I have to give it a try.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Michael Gross
Sent: Thursday, April 25, 2019 7:03 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Details On The Road
 
Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


Details On The Road

Michael Gross
 

Seems I get more modeling done in hotel rooms than at home.  One of the easiest projects on the road is adding small details, with a few parts and minimal tools.  The new door handles on this BLI NYC boxcar are a perfect example, with the molded handles replaced with flattened .008 brass rod.  It's a trifle "fiddley" as the flattened brass is quite delicate, but it makes for a lovely detail.  I did not use phosphor bronze as the harder wire was more resistant to being "squashed."
Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA


Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

Tim O'Connor
 


I think Jerry wants the "as built" lettering. There's no shortage of photos of
the cars in the post 1960 era but once repainting began all bets are off. No two
cars seem to be precisely alike.



On 4/25/2019 2:16 PM, Garth Groff wrote:
Jerry,

See RMC May 2001 for an article on these cars. These cars are also covered in Jim Eager's RIO GRANDE COLOR GUIDE TO FREIGHT AND PASSENGER EQUIPMENT.

I you don't have access to these works, please contact me off-group at mallardlodge1000_AT_gmail.com and I will put my best lens on the photos if you can tell me which lettering block to look at.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/25/19 10:47 AM, jerryglow2 wrote:
In the absence of the Oddballs set, I trying to do artwork for one but am missing some of the lettering on the right side. Any help?  For a better pic see  D&RGW 65ft mill gon

_._,_._,_




--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: D&RGW 65' mill gondola

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Jerry,

See RMC May 2001 for an article on these cars. These cars are also covered in Jim Eager's RIO GRANDE COLOR GUIDE TO FREIGHT AND PASSENGER EQUIPMENT.

I you don't have access to these works, please contact me off-group at mallardlodge1000_AT_gmail.com and I will put my best lens on the photos if you can tell me which lettering block to look at.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/25/19 10:47 AM, jerryglow2 wrote:
In the absence of the Oddballs set, I trying to do artwork for one but am missing some of the lettering on the right side. Any help?  For a better pic see  D&RGW 65ft mill gon


D&RGW 65' mill gondola

jerryglow2
 

In the absence of the Oddballs set, I trying to do artwork for one but am missing some of the lettering on the right side. Any help?  For a better pic see  D&RGW 65ft mill gon


Weathering CN boxcars

Eric Hansmann
 

Ryan Mendell shares his weathering techniques on a pair of Canadian National boxcars. It's the latest post on the Resin Car Works blog.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/canadian-national-boxcar-weathering/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy


Re: what company owns the express reefer in the image below

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob,
 
Interesting speculation - there do seem to be a number of express reefers hanging around in the image.
 
Claus Schlund
 

Does anyone know what company owns the express reefer in the image below? The car appears to have ice hatches, high speed trucks, round roof, location is described as 'View of the 7th Street Team Track by Southern Pacific Railroad' possibly in Sacramento, CA in 1925.
 
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 8:14 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] what company owns the express reefer in the image below

Could these express reefers be in a queue for clean-our and loading of high quality perishables?

As wild speculation on the car on the right with some stenciling visible the top line could be the beginning of CM&StP and the next line the beginning of "MILWAUKEE ROAD".

Bob Witt


Re: what company owns the express reefer in the image below

rwitt_2000
 

Could these express reefers be in a queue for clean-our and loading of high quality perishables?

As wild speculation on the car on the right with some stenciling visible the top line could be the beginning of CM&StP and the next line the beginning of "MILWAUKEE ROAD".

Bob Witt


Re: Poultry car photo

Steve SANDIFER
 

I have photos of live poultry cars in Clovis and Dodge City headed to the east coast. Also records of live poultry going from Texas to the east coast.



Sent via the Samsung Galaxy S8, an AT&T 4G LTE smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Edward <edb8391@...>
Date: 4/23/19 9:35 AM (GMT-06:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Poultry car photo

Hauling live chickens 3,000 miles? Regardless of season or weather, I truly doubt that.
Live chickens, being easily stressed high-strung birds, do not travel well even with food and water available along the way.. 
Although from the end of a secondary branch line, those chickens surely would have met their destiny closer to home.
They may have been sent in car-load lots to Pacific northwest markets. I'm sure there was demand for them there.
At that time in the past, rail was likely faster and less stressful for live chickens than driving them in hard-riding trucks over two-lane roads of the pre-WW II highway system.

Ed Bommer
 


Re: need help in regard of correct trucks

vapeurchapelon
 

Brian, Ben, Bruce, Tony,

lots of thanks for all your informative replies! So I will give KADEE a try with the 70ton and the T-section truck at least. What is the difference between older and newer KADEE wheels? They still are not turnings!?

I remember the odd construction of the RED CABOOSE trucks, especially the large size of the bolster which made the addition of brake shoes difficult.
I will order the BOWSER 2D-F8 trucks. These do have brake shoes, but unfortunately not in gauge (it seems at the picture at least) - but changing this on only two trucks is okay.

Many thanks again and greetings

Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953

Gesendet: Dienstag, 23. April 2019 um 00:17 Uhr
Von: "Benjamin Hom" <b.hom@att.net>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [RealSTMFC] need help in regard of correct trucks

Johannes Markwart asked:
"I have three PRR cars in need of new trucks: a X29 with plate ends and doors, a X29 with corrugated ends and doors, and a H25 quad hopper. I suspect for the X29s the 2D-F8 would be correct."
and
"The best looking 2DF8 seems to be the RED CABOOSE truck as is the case with the Bettendorf T-section truck - but are these available somewhere separately?"

I like the Red Caboose 2D-F8 truck for an early version of that truck, but I'm not a fan of its construction and odd bolster height.  I prefer the Bowser 2D-F8 truck (Stock No. #74286 without wheelsets, #74277 with wheelsets) which represents later versions of the truck and is nicely detailed.  Install Code 88 wheelsets and you're good to go.


"But what for the hopper? BOWSERs "Crown 70 ton Andrews"? And is this a good representation?"

Yes. Stock No. #74090 without wheelsets, #74091 with wheelsets.  


"One of them would be the KADEE HGC trucks which are nice, but some weeks ago I have read a note from another member of this group (I think) that by his experiences KADEE wheels are even worse dirt collectors than plastic ones - he does not recommend to use them. But which other wheel sets fit those trucks nicely? Code 88 of course. Or do you have good experiences using KADEE wheels?"

I'm not a fan of the old Kadee sintered iron wheelsets as they are dirt magnets, though someone has reported that they no longer make them.  As for the HGC 2D-F8 trucks, I prefer using them on PRR hoppers, gons, and flat cars as they add extra weight, something I don't have trouble adding to a house car.


Ben Hom  




Re: need help in regard of correct trucks

Benjamin Hom
 

Jim Betz wrote:
"I do not know why this is true ... but I've found that if you use a wire wheel in a dremel and clean the Kadee wheelsets by running them in an old plastic truck and getting them to be bright shiny - that they
do not pick up dirt as fast as they do with the blackening on them.  We can speculate on the reason - I prefer to just know that it works and use them with very few problems with dirt build up.  As in - I have used them for 2 or 3 years without any build up ... recleaning them, when necessary, is as easy as removing them and running them thru the make shift 'dirt lathe'."

I used to to do this, but I've found the opposite - the wheel treads oxidize again fairly quickly, and there's no getting around the porous sintered iron picking up more crap.  Plus I've had a few fly apart when sent through the "dirt lathe".  No, I just replace them when I see them, bag them up, and sell them off to less discerning modelers. 


Ben Hom


Re: need help in regard of correct trucks

Jim Betz
 

Ben/all,

  I do not know why this is true ... but I've found that if you use a wire
wheel in a dremel and clean the Kadee wheelsets by running them
in an old plastic truck and getting them to be bright shiny - that they
do not pick up dirt as fast as they do with the blackening on them.
  We can speculate on the reason - I prefer to just know that it works
and use them with very few problems with dirt build up.  As in - I
have used them for 2 or 3 years without any build up ... recleaning
them, when necessary, is as easy as removing them and running
them thru the make shift "dirt lathe".

  I agree with you/others that they are not the best - but if you already
have a Kadee car equipped with them - you do not need to replace
them ... just run them thru "the lathe of heaven" (apologies to Ursula).

                                                                   - Jim B.


Re: Poultry car photo

Douglas Harding
 

Interesting indeed, great find. Poultry was raised all over the country, and poultry cars were found everywhere. See attached UP ad promoting chicken raising in Washington and Oregon. Yes New York was the major market, but there many other markets, along the west coast and elsewhere. Remember each poultry car had an attendant who cared for the chickens while in transit, keep loses to a minimum.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Doug Polinder via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, April 23, 2019 9:01 AM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Poultry car photo

 

I found the attached photo of a poultry car in a book that the Lynden Tribune published in 1976 for the bicentennial celebration in my hometown of Lynden WA.  I believe the original photo either belongs to the Tribune or is in the collection of the author, Dorothy Kort.

 

I find the presence of this traffic surprising.  Lynden is at the end of a branchline off a branchline, the Milwaukee's line between Bellingham WA (which the MILW reached by ferry until 1956) and Sumas, on the Canadian border and an interchange point with the CP.  Lynden is almost as far as you can get in the contiguous 48 from New York (Blaine WA--GN, Moclips WA--NP, Coos Bay OR--SP, and Eureka CA--NWP among others are slightly more distant), so I am not sure how many chickens would survive a 3000-mile trip, especially if it was winter in Montana and North Dakota.  And chickens transported 3,000 miles are more expensive than chickens traveling from Pennsylvania or Arkansas.  

 

More remarkable to me is poultry production in the Pacific Northwest.  Washington even after the damming of the Coiumbia does not have a grain crop.  Then as now corn is grown locally, to be sure, but mainly as silage for the dairy industry.  My father had a feed mill on the GN at Ferndale, a few miles from Lynden.  All grain--wheat, corn, barley, soybeans, milo, oats--came from the Plains or the Midwest, often in CB&Q 40-foot boxcars.  (Wheat grown in the Palouse of Eastern WA is durum for pasta, not animal feed.)  So poultry must have been a small industry fed with local corn or with grain railed in from several states east.  By slightly after Our Era all commercial production of poultry in the area had ceased.

 

Either these are chickens of unimpeachable reputation, or the Milwaukee and (probably) the NYC had a very favorable tariff.

 

Doug Polinder 

Poquoson VA


Re: Poultry car photo

Edward
 

Hauling live chickens 3,000 miles? Regardless of season or weather, I truly doubt that.
Live chickens, being easily stressed high-strung birds, do not travel well even with food and water available along the way.. 
Although from the end of a secondary branch line, those chickens surely would have met their destiny closer to home.
They may have been sent in car-load lots to Pacific northwest markets. I'm sure there was demand for them there.
At that time in the past, rail was likely faster and less stressful for live chickens than driving them in hard-riding trucks over two-lane roads of the pre-WW II highway system.

Ed Bommer
 


Poultry car photo

Doug Polinder
 

I found the attached photo of a poultry car in a book that the Lynden Tribune published in 1976 for the bicentennial celebration in my hometown of Lynden WA.  I believe the original photo either belongs to the Tribune or is in the collection of the author, Dorothy Kort.

I find the presence of this traffic surprising.  Lynden is at the end of a branchline off a branchline, the Milwaukee's line between Bellingham WA (which the MILW reached by ferry until 1956) and Sumas, on the Canadian border and an interchange point with the CP.  Lynden is almost as far as you can get in the contiguous 48 from New York (Blaine WA--GN, Moclips WA--NP, Coos Bay OR--SP, and Eureka CA--NWP among others are slightly more distant), so I am not sure how many chickens would survive a 3000-mile trip, especially if it was winter in Montana and North Dakota.  And chickens transported 3,000 miles are more expensive than chickens traveling from Pennsylvania or Arkansas.  

More remarkable to me is poultry production in the Pacific Northwest.  Washington even after the damming of the Coiumbia does not have a grain crop.  Then as now corn is grown locally, to be sure, but mainly as silage for the dairy industry.  My father had a feed mill on the GN at Ferndale, a few miles from Lynden.  All grain--wheat, corn, barley, soybeans, milo, oats--came from the Plains or the Midwest, often in CB&Q 40-foot boxcars.  (Wheat grown in the Palouse of Eastern WA is durum for pasta, not animal feed.)  So poultry must have been a small industry fed with local corn or with grain railed in from several states east.  By slightly after Our Era all commercial production of poultry in the area had ceased.

Either these are chickens of unimpeachable reputation, or the Milwaukee and (probably) the NYC had a very favorable tariff.

Doug Polinder 
Poquoson VA


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Varney Metal Freight Car Kits

Chet
 

It brought back memories looking at the1948 Varney catalog.  My very first kit was the Southern box car purchased at the local pet store which had
a small amount of HO scale items.  I was 8 or 9 years old when I bought the kit.  The finished car disappeared years ago.

Chet French
Dixon, IL

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