Date   
Re: Pittsburgh photos

Tony Thompson
 

David Soderblom wrote:

Thanks so much; there are so many scenes that beg to be simulated in scale.  I wouldn’t care to do the Russian Orthodox church

    I agree with the modelability, David, but IIRC that's a Greek Orthodox church. One of the Pittsburghers on the list can correct me if that's wrong.

Tony Thompson



Pittsburgh photos

David Soderblom
 

Thanks so much; there are so many scenes that beg to be simulated in scale.  I wouldn’t care to do the Russian Orthodox church, but there are all those lovely details: the combination of concrete and stone walls; the general grunge; the excavation in the brick-paved street; the (almost) 3-way street turnout, but not with girder rail; the riverside scenes.



David Soderblom
Baltimore MD USA
drs@..., 410-338-4543





Re: Freight car roofs, 1959

Tom Madden
 

On Thu, Apr 9, 2020 at 01:10 PM, D. Scott Chatfield wrote:
Interesting view of a yard in California in 1959.  Note that Brock's Law is in force....
 
Have been systematically scanning my slides going back to 1968. Here's one from September 1962, stopped for a passing CB&Q freight in Edgemont SD on our way from the Black Hills to Colorado and just had to take a photo from the car window. Sure enough, a round roof NP auto car just made it into the frame at the right edge. Brock's Law prevails!

Tom Madden
 
 

Re: DL&W Boxcar 49488 Photo

ed_mines
 

My recollection is that the car was a one-of-a-kind with experimental sides. Can't remember how I know this. I've seen this photo or a similar one several times before, maybe in a CBC or Trainshed

Re: Meat reefers

Nelson Moyer
 

Those stock cars of hogs answered the question about livestock in meat trains, and the FGEX produce reefer means that those trains weren’t all meat. I’ll check out the Red Caboose model. All this is very helpful.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of William Hirt
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 2:31 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

Nelson,

Doug Harding can answer this question better. Morrell did daily (except Sunday) slaughter of cattle, hogs and sheep. And besides hanging sides of such, they also had packaged meats, dog food (Red Heart), hides (which were a high tariff commodity), canned meats, etc. I found a postcard that claimed Morrell could slaughter 2 million head of livestock a year in Ottumwa. So that would be almost 6,900 head a day. So how many cars that translates to someone more knowledgeable than I will need to say.

Looking at some 1959 CB&Q switchlists that Russ Strotz posted on the Railway Bull Shippers list about 10 years ago, it appears on average 7 MORX reefers were forwarded to the IHB at Congress Park each day. How many went to Chicago proper or went to Peoria for forwarding is unknown. Attached is a July 31 1959 consist of 1st LC departing Galesburg for Clyde yard. Also set outs for April 5 1959 at Congress Park. It was an active interchange.

Take a look for the Red Caboose Morrell Mather reefer.

Bill Hirt

On 4/9/2020 1:40 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

Thanks, Bill. I’ve been collecting meat reefers to model these trains, but I only have one Morrell reefer so far. It was built from the old Sunshine kit. It sounds like I need at least nine more for the Morrell traffic. I was hoping someone had a wheel report for one of those trains to see if they had stock cars or general merchandise to fill out a train. It’s hard to believe that Morrell could generate 50-70 cars per day during the week.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of William Hirt
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 9:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

The May 1951 Ottumwa and Creston Division Employee Timetable shows that CB&Q Train 74 (labeled Daily except Sunday Meat) was scheduled to leave Ottumwa at 5:45 pm and arrive Galesburg at 9:45 pm. There was no equivalent scheduled train westbound. I suspect extras brought back empty reefers to Ottumwa to balance power. Whether the eastbound train carried anything but meat I do not know.

The South Omaha Daily Meat (symboled LC) left Council Bluffs Yard at 4:30 pm, arrived Ottumwa 1:45 am and departed 2:00 am, and arrived Galesburg at 5:30 am.

The March 1952 Galesburg Division Employee Timetable showed Train 70 (Daily Meat) departing Galesburg at 7:00 am arriving Peoria at 9:15 am. It's counterpart appears to be Train 91 (Daily Merchandise) which left Peoria at 11:00 am and arrived Galesburg 1:30 pm.

The September 1951 Chicago and Aurora Division Employee Timetable shows Train LC (Daily Omaha Kansas City St. Joe Meat) departing Galesburg 8:00 am, arriving Congress Park 1:00 pm (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde 1:30 pm.

The Ottumwa Meat had it's own train on this division. Train 74A (Daily Ottumwa Meat) departed Galesburg at 11:30 pm, arriving Congress Park at 3:45 am (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde at 4:15 pm.

On the Chicago and Aurora Division, there were eight scheduled eastbounds and and six scheduled westbounds. So it is hard to match trains up.

Bill Hirt

On_._,_

Re: Freight car roofs, 1959

Jack Mullen
 

Seriously, $79.99 ?!?

But I do like the deteriorated and patched flatcar deck in the fg.

Jack Mullen

Re: DL&W Boxcar 49488 Photo

mopacfirst
 

I don't know anything about this car specifically.  But I went back and looked carefully at it, and the vertical ribs appear to be equally spaced in each panel.  If they're really there, perhaps it was an experiment to stiffen each panel.  Exactly what problem this was supposed to solve is not obvious.

The artifacts on the roof could actually be rooflines of a building that weren't cropped out.  And the 'box' near the rear truck, I believe is a panel that some railroads had installed in front of the triple valve to protect it from damage.

I remain eagerly awaiting hearing from anyone who has actual knowledge of this experiment.

Ron Merrick

Re: Meat reefers

 

Re: Meat reefers

William Hirt
 

Nelson,

Doug Harding can answer this question better. Morrell did daily (except Sunday) slaughter of cattle, hogs and sheep. And besides hanging sides of such, they also had packaged meats, dog food (Red Heart), hides (which were a high tariff commodity), canned meats, etc. I found a postcard that claimed Morrell could slaughter 2 million head of livestock a year in Ottumwa. So that would be almost 6,900 head a day. So how many cars that translates to someone more knowledgeable than I will need to say.

Looking at some 1959 CB&Q switchlists that Russ Strotz posted on the Railway Bull Shippers list about 10 years ago, it appears on average 7 MORX reefers were forwarded to the IHB at Congress Park each day. How many went to Chicago proper or went to Peoria for forwarding is unknown. Attached is a July 31 1959 consist of 1st LC departing Galesburg for Clyde yard. Also set outs for April 5 1959 at Congress Park. It was an active interchange.

Take a look for the Red Caboose Morrell Mather reefer.

Bill Hirt

On 4/9/2020 1:40 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

Thanks, Bill. I’ve been collecting meat reefers to model these trains, but I only have one Morrell reefer so far. It was built from the old Sunshine kit. It sounds like I need at least nine more for the Morrell traffic. I was hoping someone had a wheel report for one of those trains to see if they had stock cars or general merchandise to fill out a train. It’s hard to believe that Morrell could generate 50-70 cars per day during the week.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of William Hirt
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 9:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

The May 1951 Ottumwa and Creston Division Employee Timetable shows that CB&Q Train 74 (labeled Daily except Sunday Meat) was scheduled to leave Ottumwa at 5:45 pm and arrive Galesburg at 9:45 pm. There was no equivalent scheduled train westbound. I suspect extras brought back empty reefers to Ottumwa to balance power. Whether the eastbound train carried anything but meat I do not know.

The South Omaha Daily Meat (symboled LC) left Council Bluffs Yard at 4:30 pm, arrived Ottumwa 1:45 am and departed 2:00 am, and arrived Galesburg at 5:30 am.

The March 1952 Galesburg Division Employee Timetable showed Train 70 (Daily Meat) departing Galesburg at 7:00 am arriving Peoria at 9:15 am. It's counterpart appears to be Train 91 (Daily Merchandise) which left Peoria at 11:00 am and arrived Galesburg 1:30 pm.

The September 1951 Chicago and Aurora Division Employee Timetable shows Train LC (Daily Omaha Kansas City St. Joe Meat) departing Galesburg 8:00 am, arriving Congress Park 1:00 pm (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde 1:30 pm.

The Ottumwa Meat had it's own train on this division. Train 74A (Daily Ottumwa Meat) departed Galesburg at 11:30 pm, arriving Congress Park at 3:45 am (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde at 4:15 pm.

On the Chicago and Aurora Division, there were eight scheduled eastbounds and and six scheduled westbounds. So it is hard to match trains up.

Bill Hirt

On_._,_

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

CJ Riley
 

I see the roof of Levenson Steel poking up. I worked there for a few weeks in the early 60s painting steel for I-7 in eastern Ohio. I was transferred there following 2months doing the same job at their McKees Rocks facility in the leased former Pressed Steel Car plant. Even got to load over length girders in mill gone for a bit. 



Re: Meat reefers

Ted Schnepf
 

Hi Nelson,

Your are correct in that that one plant could not produce 50 loads in one day. Keep in mind the Milwaukee, RI, and Wabash also got a few loads of meat in Ottumwa. Off course the plant also produced tank cars of tallow and cars of hides. And then I am certain the train was filled with other priority cars going eastbound.

As I understand the packing industry Monday was a slow shipping day, and then at the end of the week Friday and Saturday the output increased.

I also have a shortage of Morrell reefers, in my case out of Sioux Falls.

Ted Schnepf
126 Will Scarlet,
Elgin, Ill. 60120


847=697-5353


On Thursday, April 9, 2020, 01:40:22 PM CDT, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:


Thanks, Bill. I’ve been collecting meat reefers to model these trains, but I only have one Morrell reefer so far. It was built from the old Sunshine kit. It sounds like I need at least nine more for the Morrell traffic. I was hoping someone had a wheel report for one of those trains to see if they had stock cars or general merchandise to fill out a train. It’s hard to believe that Morrell could generate 50-70 cars per day during the week.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of William Hirt
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 9:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

The May 1951 Ottumwa and Creston Division Employee Timetable shows that CB&Q Train 74 (labeled Daily except Sunday Meat) was scheduled to leave Ottumwa at 5:45 pm and arrive Galesburg at 9:45 pm. There was no equivalent scheduled train westbound. I suspect extras brought back empty reefers to Ottumwa to balance power. Whether the eastbound train carried anything but meat I do not know.

The South Omaha Daily Meat (symboled LC) left Council Bluffs Yard at 4:30 pm, arrived Ottumwa 1:45 am and departed 2:00 am, and arrived Galesburg at 5:30 am.

The March 1952 Galesburg Division Employee Timetable showed Train 70 (Daily Meat) departing Galesburg at 7:00 am arriving Peoria at 9:15 am. It's counterpart appears to be Train 91 (Daily Merchandise) which left Peoria at 11:00 am and arrived Galesburg 1:30 pm.

The September 1951 Chicago and Aurora Division Employee Timetable shows Train LC (Daily Omaha Kansas City St. Joe Meat) departing Galesburg 8:00 am, arriving Congress Park 1:00 pm (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde 1:30 pm.

The Ottumwa Meat had it's own train on this division. Train 74A (Daily Ottumwa Meat) departed Galesburg at 11:30 pm, arriving Congress Park at 3:45 am (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde at 4:15 pm.

On the Chicago and Aurora Division, there were eight scheduled eastbounds and and six scheduled westbounds. So it is hard to match trains up.

Bill Hirt

Freight car roofs, 1959

D. Scott Chatfield
 

Interesting view of a yard in California in 1959.  Note that Brock's Law is in force....

https://www.ebay.com/itm/UP-Union-Pacific-New-York-Central-Car-in-California-in-1959-Original-Slide-e3b/324108985085

Scott Chatfield

Re: Meat reefers

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks, Bill. I’ve been collecting meat reefers to model these trains, but I only have one Morrell reefer so far. It was built from the old Sunshine kit. It sounds like I need at least nine more for the Morrell traffic. I was hoping someone had a wheel report for one of those trains to see if they had stock cars or general merchandise to fill out a train. It’s hard to believe that Morrell could generate 50-70 cars per day during the week.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of William Hirt
Sent: Thursday, April 09, 2020 9:31 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

The May 1951 Ottumwa and Creston Division Employee Timetable shows that CB&Q Train 74 (labeled Daily except Sunday Meat) was scheduled to leave Ottumwa at 5:45 pm and arrive Galesburg at 9:45 pm. There was no equivalent scheduled train westbound. I suspect extras brought back empty reefers to Ottumwa to balance power. Whether the eastbound train carried anything but meat I do not know.

The South Omaha Daily Meat (symboled LC) left Council Bluffs Yard at 4:30 pm, arrived Ottumwa 1:45 am and departed 2:00 am, and arrived Galesburg at 5:30 am.

The March 1952 Galesburg Division Employee Timetable showed Train 70 (Daily Meat) departing Galesburg at 7:00 am arriving Peoria at 9:15 am. It's counterpart appears to be Train 91 (Daily Merchandise) which left Peoria at 11:00 am and arrived Galesburg 1:30 pm.

The September 1951 Chicago and Aurora Division Employee Timetable shows Train LC (Daily Omaha Kansas City St. Joe Meat) departing Galesburg 8:00 am, arriving Congress Park 1:00 pm (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde 1:30 pm.

The Ottumwa Meat had it's own train on this division. Train 74A (Daily Ottumwa Meat) departed Galesburg at 11:30 pm, arriving Congress Park at 3:45 am (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde at 4:15 pm.

On the Chicago and Aurora Division, there were eight scheduled eastbounds and and six scheduled westbounds. So it is hard to match trains up.

Bill Hirt

On 4/8/2020 5:36 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

How many cars per train on average, and were trains dispatched both the East and West on different days? Were they solid blocks of Morrell cars? Where they strictly meat trains or did they include other freight or livestock? I knew about the Morrell plant in Ottumwa, and I’d like to model the Morrell train through Burlington on the way to Galesburg and points East.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of William Hirt
Sent: Wednesday, April 08, 2020 5:19 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

The Morrell meat traffic was important enough to the CB&Q that for a number of years the president of Morrell was on the CB&Q Board of Directors. The Q originated a train at Ottumwa IA each weekday afternoon just for the Morrell traffic. As Doug knows, Morrell slaughtered cattle, hogs and sheep in Ottumwa.

Bill Hirt

On 4/8/2020 10:30 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:

The Nickle Plate handled a lot of meat because it was a fast route. Meat was time sensitive and the meat packers wanted their products delivered as quickly as possible. Out of Omaha, meat packers could choose between six different railroads to get to Omaha. All roads were given meat traffic, with each road having a specific day when they go the majority of traffic. As rates were regulated, this was how the packers kept the railroads on their toes with demands for speed. The Illinois Central was the preferred route as the IC moved the meat faster than others. The CBQ had the option of going to Peoria for eastern connections instead of Chicago. East out of Chicago, the NKP was the preferred routing for meat going to NYC or New England.

 

I am not as well versed in meat traffic east of Chicago. Attached is a spreadsheet prepared by John Greedy and Jim Singer, which shows the meat traffic east of Chicago on various roads in the 50s.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

._,_

Re: Meat reefers

Bill Keene
 

Thanks for the LCL reefer info.  

In the next week I am going to take some time to do a bit of “research” with regard to if an LCL reefer service was operated on the Gridley Branch — ATSF Burlington District - Eastern Division.  

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On Apr 9, 2020, at 6:57 AM, Clark Propst <cepropst@q.com> wrote:

On Tue, Apr 7, 2020 at 02:56 PM, Bill Keene wrote:
Unfortunately, I model a little known Santa Fe branch line that once operated in east central Kansas. Meat reefers on this 50 miles of track would have been a rare event. Most likely if one were to arrive on the line it most surely was a very lost or somehow mis-directed car. 
 
Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

Bill here are some LCL meat reefers. These car just a small sampling from the spread sheet
FAIRFAX MN M&StL SEAL BOOK ENTRIES FROM SAM SHERMAN          
DATE TRAIN NO. INITIALS  NUMBER CONTENTS CAR TYPE NO. SERIES INBOUND OUTBOUND BUSINESS
5/29/1947 72 URTX 27288 MEAT RS 27000-27999 INBOUND OUTBOUND LCL
8/14/1947 72 GARX  67337 MEAT RS 67100-67499 INBOUND OUTBOUND LCL
9/11/1947 72 FGEX 33651 MEAT RS 32100-35898 INBOUND OUTBOUND LCL

 

Re: DL&W Boxcar 49488 Photo

StephenK
 

There is also the box near the rear truck.   Perhaps a heater, and the pipes on top are vents?

Steve Kay

Re: Anyone Want A First Generation SFRD Mechanical Reefer?

Tim O'Connor
 


Bob you need to move your questions to another group - Some of these cars
didn't exist in the STMFC era which ends with 1960.

I could help you, but not here. ;-)



On 4/9/2020 12:40 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io wrote:

Comments and questions from David North...

I model 1985 and was re-reading Stephen Priest’s boxcar book and remembered that most of the reefer classes that Bob mentioned were converted to boxcars around 1979.

Rr-54 converted to Bx-201          over 9 cars 1979-1987

Rr-56 converted to Bx-202           over 67 cars 1979-1987

Rr-60 converted to Bx-203           over 6 cars 1979-1987

Rr-61 converted to Bx-204           over 15 cars 1979-1987

Rr-65 converted to Bx-205           over 40 cars 1979-1987

Rr-66 converted to Bx-195*         over 600 cars 1979-1991

*Bx-195 class consisted of Rr-66, 69 & 71 conversions

So I’d be happy with any of the above classes, provided the body mods were minimal.

Does anyone know what body modifications were made when the cars were converted?

Cheers

Dave



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

Re: Anyone Want A First Generation SFRD Mechanical Reefer?

Bob Chaparro
 

Comments and questions from David North...

I model 1985 and was re-reading Stephen Priest’s boxcar book and remembered that most of the reefer classes that Bob mentioned were converted to boxcars around 1979.

Rr-54 converted to Bx-201          over 9 cars 1979-1987

Rr-56 converted to Bx-202           over 67 cars 1979-1987

Rr-60 converted to Bx-203           over 6 cars 1979-1987

Rr-61 converted to Bx-204           over 15 cars 1979-1987

Rr-65 converted to Bx-205           over 40 cars 1979-1987

Rr-66 converted to Bx-195*         over 600 cars 1979-1991

*Bx-195 class consisted of Rr-66, 69 & 71 conversions

So I’d be happy with any of the above classes, provided the body mods were minimal.

Does anyone know what body modifications were made when the cars were converted?

Cheers

Dave

Sold: InterMountain Santa Fe (SFRD) Reefers, RTR and Kits (HO)

Joseph Melhorn
 

Most of the RTR cars and all of the kits are sold, thanks to all who purchased them. I still have five: SFRD  - Ship & Travel - Large Herald - BLT 6-37/  RR21 cars available. Pricing per RTR car is $24.00/ea. Or buy the lot of five cars for $100.00. Shipping from 85629 is extra. I will ship the most economical way. Payment by PP F&F, check or M.O. Please reply off-list to: toyman@... with your wants.

Thanks,

Joe Melhorn

Sahuarita, AZ  85629

 

 

Re: Meat reefers

 

Hello all,

In the RCW blog that started this tread, Frank says he needs a good Berk. to pull some meat reefers.

Here's one:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8PRB8INkfA

Go to 7.05 on film and enjoy.

Dan Smith

Re: Meat reefers

William Hirt
 

The May 1951 Ottumwa and Creston Division Employee Timetable shows that CB&Q Train 74 (labeled Daily except Sunday Meat) was scheduled to leave Ottumwa at 5:45 pm and arrive Galesburg at 9:45 pm. There was no equivalent scheduled train westbound. I suspect extras brought back empty reefers to Ottumwa to balance power. Whether the eastbound train carried anything but meat I do not know.

The South Omaha Daily Meat (symboled LC) left Council Bluffs Yard at 4:30 pm, arrived Ottumwa 1:45 am and departed 2:00 am, and arrived Galesburg at 5:30 am.

The March 1952 Galesburg Division Employee Timetable showed Train 70 (Daily Meat) departing Galesburg at 7:00 am arriving Peoria at 9:15 am. It's counterpart appears to be Train 91 (Daily Merchandise) which left Peoria at 11:00 am and arrived Galesburg 1:30 pm.

The September 1951 Chicago and Aurora Division Employee Timetable shows Train LC (Daily Omaha Kansas City St. Joe Meat) departing Galesburg 8:00 am, arriving Congress Park 1:00 pm (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde 1:30 pm.

The Ottumwa Meat had it's own train on this division. Train 74A (Daily Ottumwa Meat) departed Galesburg at 11:30 pm, arriving Congress Park at 3:45 am (to make set out for IHB) and then arrives Clyde at 4:15 pm.

On the Chicago and Aurora Division, there were eight scheduled eastbounds and and six scheduled westbounds. So it is hard to match trains up.

Bill Hirt

On 4/8/2020 5:36 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

How many cars per train on average, and were trains dispatched both the East and West on different days? Were they solid blocks of Morrell cars? Where they strictly meat trains or did they include other freight or livestock? I knew about the Morrell plant in Ottumwa, and I’d like to model the Morrell train through Burlington on the way to Galesburg and points East.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of William Hirt
Sent: Wednesday, April 08, 2020 5:19 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Meat reefers

 

The Morrell meat traffic was important enough to the CB&Q that for a number of years the president of Morrell was on the CB&Q Board of Directors. The Q originated a train at Ottumwa IA each weekday afternoon just for the Morrell traffic. As Doug knows, Morrell slaughtered cattle, hogs and sheep in Ottumwa.

Bill Hirt

On 4/8/2020 10:30 AM, Douglas Harding wrote:

The Nickle Plate handled a lot of meat because it was a fast route. Meat was time sensitive and the meat packers wanted their products delivered as quickly as possible. Out of Omaha, meat packers could choose between six different railroads to get to Omaha. All roads were given meat traffic, with each road having a specific day when they go the majority of traffic. As rates were regulated, this was how the packers kept the railroads on their toes with demands for speed. The Illinois Central was the preferred route as the IC moved the meat faster than others. The CBQ had the option of going to Peoria for eastern connections instead of Chicago. East out of Chicago, the NKP was the preferred routing for meat going to NYC or New England.

 

I am not as well versed in meat traffic east of Chicago. Attached is a spreadsheet prepared by John Greedy and Jim Singer, which shows the meat traffic east of Chicago on various roads in the 50s.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

._,_