Date   

Re: prototype for this covered hopper model?

Tim O'Connor
 


BINGO, Bob!! I think it matches the Erie car the best - the Owens-Illinois
is very slightly different. Thanks!

Tim O'

(image scan from Ted Culotta's Ebay auction - thank you Ted!)


Tim,

I think that's one of the Erie 50 ton covered hoppers from the early 1930s, IIRC a Greenville 1321 cu. ft. design. I know Owens Corning (the red "Duraglas" lettering) also had some, and a Royce Chemicals company from NJ. I think RI got some second hand for locomotive sand service as well.

F&C makes a HO resin kit, but the brass model was imported by PSC.

Bob Heninger
Minot, ND

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Steel Plate Loads

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Hi Bob:

I have an excellent hand out (how to) 
from a seminar some years back.  I am leaving for Naperville early tomorrow and will be gone for about two weeks.  If you still need one then I will get a co lol y to you.  It is quite comprehensive.

Bill



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...>
Date: 10/13/18 2:41 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Steel Plate Loads

Can anyone direct me to a 1950s era loading diagram or prototype photo for steel plate on a flat car?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Archive of MODEL CRAFTSMAN/RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines.

Tony Thompson
 

Ralph Brown wrote:

Hi Tim,
Even so, at least some of those doing the scanning are claiming a copyright for the scans.  I have no idea whether such claims are valid under current copyright laws, but if they are, such scans will not likely enter the public domain in my lifetime.

   Such claims are not remotely legitimate, unless they are also the original publisher. I hereby give you license to not only ignore such claims, but to insult the claimants.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: prototype for this covered hopper model?

Robert Heninger
 

Tim,

I think that's one of the Erie 50 ton covered hoppers from the early 1930s, IIRC a Greenville 1321 cu. ft. design. I know Owens Corning (the red "Duraglas" lettering) also had some, and a Royce Chemicals company from NJ. I think RI got some second hand for locomotive sand service as well.

F&C makes a HO resin kit, but the brass model was imported by PSC.

Bob Heninger
Minot, ND


Re: Archive of MODEL CRAFTSMAN/RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines.

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

Friends, I left off a key piece of information: the organized Craftsman archive stops at 2006. Sorry!

Any that I have in the years since 2006 (and I do have quite a few) I will glad to include..

Denny




Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Re: B&O 5470

Tim O'Connor
 


Mighty fine weathering on that model!

I have a photo that shows an N-10e (B&O 325156) although I don't recall where
I got that information - can't see the class stencil in the photo.

Tim O'Connor




I have just completed a build of F&C kit # 6761, B&O 9 Panel Hopper. This kit has a one piece body casting, so it was not a particularly difficult build, for a hopper. I followed the kit instructions in building the car and fitted it with TMW Andrews trucks and Kadee code 88 wheelsets. Paint is Scalecoat Engine Black and Testor's Dullcoat. Weathering is a thinned coat of Scalecoat  Flat Grime #1 followed with various Pan Pastel colors. Decals are the original F&C - Not entirely satisfactory.

The F&C data sheet says these cars were built for the CNJ and were a stretched version of the 1905 standard hopper design.CNJ ordered 2000 of these cars in 1920, followed by orders for additional cars. Beginning in 1940, AB brakes replaced the original K brakes and 978 of the upgraded cars were leased to the B&O at that time. B&O numbered them into their 5460 - 5534 series. I could not find a B&O class number for these cars and the instruction sheet photos only shows the designation *HM". The decal sheet has N-10 printed on it but this is incorrect, I believe. These cars had a long life as the B&O rebuilt, and renumbered, them in the mid-1950's.

This is an interesting version of a rib side hopper due to the extra side panel which results in the apex of the center slope sheets being placed in the center of the center panel rather than the normal placement at the center rib.

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown WV

Attachments:

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


B&O 5470

James E Kubanick
 

I have just completed a build of F&C kit # 6761, B&O 9 Panel Hopper. This kit has a one piece body casting, so it was not a particularly difficult build, for a hopper. I followed the kit instructions in building the car and fitted it with TMW Andrews trucks and Kadee code 88 wheelsets. Paint is Scalecoat Engine Black and Testor's Dullcoat. Weathering is a thinned coat of Scalecoat  Flat Grime #1 followed with various Pan Pastel colors. Decals are the original F&C - Not entirely satisfactory.

The F&C data sheet says these cars were built for the CNJ and were a stretched version of the 1905 standard hopper design.CNJ ordered 2000 of these cars in 1920, followed by orders for additional cars. Beginning in 1940, AB brakes replaced the original K brakes and 978 of the upgraded cars were leased to the B&O at that time. B&O numbered them into their 5460 - 5534 series. I could not find a B&O class number for these cars and the instruction sheet photos only shows the designation *HM". The decal sheet has N-10 printed on it but this is incorrect, I believe. These cars had a long life as the B&O rebuilt, and renumbered, them in the mid-1950's.

This is an interesting version of a rib side hopper due to the extra side panel which results in the apex of the center slope sheets being placed in the center of the center panel rather than the normal placement at the center rib.

Jim Kubanick
Morgantown WV


prototype for this covered hopper model?

Tim O'Connor
 

A well made brass model... but I don't know whose it is.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/283204477169

-----------------



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: Archive of MODEL CRAFTSMAN/RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines.

Ralph W. Brown
 

Hi Tim,
 
Even so, at least some of those doing the scanning are claiming a copyright for the scans.  I have no idea whether such claims are valid under current copyright laws, but if they are, such scans will not likely enter the public domain in my lifetime.
 
Pax,
 
 
Ralph Brown
Portland, Maine
PRRT&HS No. 3966
NMRA No. L2532

rbrown51[at]maine[dot]rr[dot]com
 

From: Tim O'Connor
Sent: Sunday, October 14, 2018 7:12 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Archive of MODEL CRAFTSMAN/RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines.
 

Unless the copyrights were officially renewed, everything published prior to 1944
(75 years ago) will be in the public domain in 2019. An official renewal buys an
additional 20 years. So in 2019, in any case, everything published prior to 1924 will
be public domain in 2019 (95 years old, starting in January).

I just mention it because electronic scans of a great many railroad publications of
interest to us all will enter the public domain every year from now on - and digital
copies are SO much easier to deal with than tons of paper! I'm sure many of us have
archives - I have every issue of Mainline Modeler, Railmodel Journal, and literally a
ton or two of other magazines.

Tim O'Connor



I have an almost-complete archive of RMC and it earlier named MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines back to its earliest days in 1933 (Vol 1).  The earliest volumes through 1939 are in archive boxes. 1940-1979 are in publisher loose leaf binders (seven volumes are in high quality custom gold-leafed hard bindings).  Later volumes to 1990 are in individual durable plastic shelf boxes (a few in professional archive-grade library boxes. 

I have received much pleasure with these volumes over the many decades, and I can still get quite lost in perusing so many of them  page by page.  My particular favorite was to perceive the competopm between the MR and Model Craftsman  when Frank Taylor brought out is revolutionary Milwaukee Road 4-6-4 kit (US HO's very first locomotive kit).  Taylor announced the kit -with Bill Walthers- in the MR, but…how to construct it appearred the very next month in Model Craftsman (Taylor sold the kit to Walthers  -who produced it to 1939, and then subsequently be came one of MR's strongest editors). 

These are -in toto- FREE FOB Sacramento. They are shippable, but at what giant expense?   I will not part them out, so please do not ask (;-).  With no takers, these will go to the dumpster- a sad end. 

I am yet unaware that this magazine archive has yet to be digitized, and if it has in a genuinely usable way, please let me know.

PLEASE CONTACT ME ONLY OFF-LINE!
 
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Archive of MODEL CRAFTSMAN/RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines.

Tim O'Connor
 


Unless the copyrights were officially renewed, everything published prior to 1944
(75 years ago) will be in the public domain in 2019. An official renewal buys an
additional 20 years. So in 2019, in any case, everything published prior to 1924 will
be public domain in 2019 (95 years old, starting in January).

I just mention it because electronic scans of a great many railroad publications of
interest to us all will enter the public domain every year from now on - and digital
copies are SO much easier to deal with than tons of paper! I'm sure many of us have
archives - I have every issue of Mainline Modeler, Railmodel Journal, and literally a
ton or two of other magazines.

Tim O'Connor



I have an almost-complete archive of RMC and it earlier named MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines back to its earliest days in 1933 (Vol 1).  The earliest volumes through 1939 are in archive boxes. 1940-1979 are in publisher loose leaf binders (seven volumes are in high quality custom gold-leafed hard bindings).  Later volumes to 1990 are in individual durable plastic shelf boxes (a few in professional archive-grade library boxes. 

I have received much pleasure with these volumes over the many decades, and I can still get quite lost in perusing so many of them  page by page.  My particular favorite was to perceive the competopm between the MR and Model Craftsman  when Frank Taylor brought out is revolutionary Milwaukee Road 4-6-4 kit (US HO's very first locomotive kit).  Taylor announced the kit -with Bill Walthers- in the MR, but…how to construct it appearred the very next month in Model Craftsman (Taylor sold the kit to Walthers  -who produced it to 1939, and then subsequently be came one of MR's strongest editors). 

These are -in toto- FREE FOB Sacramento. They are shippable, but at what giant expense?   I will not part them out, so please do not ask (;-).  With no takers, these will go to the dumpster- a sad end. 

I am yet unaware that this magazine archive has yet to be digitized, and if it has in a genuinely usable way, please let me know.

PLEASE CONTACT ME ONLY OFF-LINE!
 
Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Archive of MODEL CRAFTSMAN/RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines.

Allan Smith
 

If they are still available I will pick them up and make the info available to anyone requesting it.

Al Smith
Sonora Ca


On Sunday, October 14, 2018 2:25 PM, Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...> wrote:


I have an almost-complete archive of RMC and it earlier named MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines back to its earliest days in 1933 (Vol 1).  The earliest volumes through 1939 are in archive boxes. 1940-1979 are in publisher loose leaf binders (seven volumes are in high quality custom gold-leafed hard bindings).  Later volumes to 1990 are in individual durable plastic shelf boxes (a few in professional archive-grade library boxes.

I have received much pleasure with these volumes over the many decades, and I can still get quite lost in perusing so many of them  page by page.  My particular favorite was to perceive the competopm between the MR and Model Craftsman  when Frank Taylor brought out is revolutionary Milwaukee Road 4-6-4 kit (US HO’s very first locomotive kit).  Taylor announced the kit -with Bill Walthers- in the MR, but…how to construct it appeared the very next month in Model Craftsman (Taylor sold the kit to Walthers  -who produced it to 1939, and then subsequently be came one of MR’s strongest editors).

These are -in toto- FREE FOB Sacramento. They are shippable, but at what giant expense?  I will not part them out, so please do not ask (;-).  With no takers, these will go to the dumpster- a sad end.

I am yet unaware that this magazine archive has yet to be digitized, and if it has in a genuinely usable way, please let me know.

PLEASE CONTACT ME ONLY OFF-LINE!

Denny


Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864






Archive of MODEL CRAFTSMAN/RAILROAD MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines.

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

I have an almost-complete archive of RMC and it earlier named MODEL CRAFTSMAN magazines back to its earliest days in 1933 (Vol 1). The earliest volumes through 1939 are in archive boxes. 1940-1979 are in publisher loose leaf binders (seven volumes are in high quality custom gold-leafed hard bindings). Later volumes to 1990 are in individual durable plastic shelf boxes (a few in professional archive-grade library boxes.

I have received much pleasure with these volumes over the many decades, and I can still get quite lost in perusing so many of them page by page. My particular favorite was to perceive the competopm between the MR and Model Craftsman when Frank Taylor brought out is revolutionary Milwaukee Road 4-6-4 kit (US HO’s very first locomotive kit). Taylor announced the kit -with Bill Walthers- in the MR, but…how to construct it appeared the very next month in Model Craftsman (Taylor sold the kit to Walthers -who produced it to 1939, and then subsequently be came one of MR’s strongest editors).

These are -in toto- FREE FOB Sacramento. They are shippable, but at what giant expense? I will not part them out, so please do not ask (;-). With no takers, these will go to the dumpster- a sad end.

I am yet unaware that this magazine archive has yet to be digitized, and if it has in a genuinely usable way, please let me know.

PLEASE CONTACT ME ONLY OFF-LINE!

Denny


Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Re: Gondola Modeling

Bill Welch
 
Edited

Agreed very informative, thank you Bob and Charlie for making this available. There are two slides of NYC 713037 under the Greenville Gon section attributed as an MTH model but towards the end L-L Proto 2000 is listed for the Greenville gon. Did MTH do the Greenville gon?

Bill Welch


Delano Book

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Good Friends,

A few days ago I purchased THE RAILROAD PHOTOGRAPHY OF JACK DELANO by Tony Reevy (ISBN 9780253017772) from E.R. Hamilton Booksellers. I have found Delano's photographs which we have discussed to be fascinating. This hardback book runs 186 pages, and is filled with Delano's railroad photographs from the 1940s when he worked for the Farm Service Administration and its successor the Office of War Information. The majority are black-and-white photos of railroad subjects, including trains, facilities and people (both men and women--it was wartime). It also includes a section of 34 color views. The text, which I have yet to read, tells us more about Jack Delano, and his several journeys around the country to photograph trains.

All of the photos in this book are held by the Library of Congress, and are probably available online. This volume represents only a selection from his work. The largest group are photos of his cross-country trip on the AT&SF, but other chapters include various lines around Chicago, the BAR in Maine, some PRR , and three striking color views of "Hulette" ore unloaders. I was disappointed that the color photos of the C&NW Chicago yards which we have poured over were not included, but there are other freight yard photos with lots of identifiable cars. There is also plenty of atmosphere here to help a modeler doing the late 1930s or the War years, especially in the color shots.

Considering that the book is only $9.95 (plus $4 shipping and handling per book if paid by credit card, or a flat $4 for your entire order if paid by check), it was worthwhile, despite not having some photos for which I had hoped. Hamilton's is a close-out/remainder house, so if you want a copy order soon.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿


Re: SP H-70-6 Covered Hopper 1949 Version

Ken Adams
 

I was in Italy and UK for the last three weeks so probably would have missed the Intermountain offer anyway.  Will be on the lookout as my planned (will it ever be built?) Walnut Creek modules will need 4-5 SP H-70-4 or H-70-6 cement hoppers for cement traffic supporting the late 1940's early 1950's period paving of Bay Area suburbia.


Re: Gondola Modeling

Tim O'Connor
 


Outstanding!! Thanks to Charlie Tapper for sharing that!

Tim O'Connor



Here is a link to an on-line presentation by Charlie Tapper on Freight Car Modeling: With Special Emphasis on Transition Era Gondolas. This was presented at the Indian Nation’s Division/NMRA meet on September 22, 2012.
http://www.tulsanmra.org/resources/Freight_Car_Modeling.pdf
This presentation, at 134 pages, is loaded with photos and illustrations. The focus is on:
  • Creating a Plausible Fleet­One That Mirrors the Prototype in Distribution of Cars
  • Identifying Correct Cars for the Industries On Your Layout
  • Creating a Detailed Fleet, With Cars Being Correctly Detailed to Era, Type, Paint Scheme, Lettering, Weathering, and Appliances
Bob Chaparro

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Gondola Modeling

Bob Chaparro
 

Here is a link to an on-line presentation by Charlie Tapper on "Freight Car Modeling: With Special Emphasis on TransitionEra Gondolas". This was presented at the Indian Nation’s Division/NMRA meet on September 22, 2012.

http://www.tulsanmra.org/resources/Freight_Car_Modeling.pdf

This presentation, at 134 pages, is loaded with photos and illustrations. The focus is on:

  • Creating a Plausible Fleet—One That Mirrors the Prototype in Distribution of Cars
  • Identifying Correct Cars for the Industries On Your Layout
  • Creating a Detailed Fleet, With Cars Being Correctly Detailed to Era, Type, Paint Scheme, Lettering, Weathering, and Appliances

Bob Chaparro

Moderator

Model Railroads of Southern California

https://groups.io/g/ModelRailroadsofSoCalif


Re: E&B Valley RR ACF Covered Hopper

StephenK
 

After reading everyone else's experience with this kit I don't feel too bad.   I removed a few parts that I thought could be used in my scrapyard, and kept the truck sideframes, and tossed the rest.   Lesson learned!

One more thing: this kit came with X2F couplers, and no others.   Fortunately, you don't see that anymore either!

Steve Kay


Re: Steel Plate Loads

Eric Hansmann
 

Bob,

The Photo section on our Groups.io site has an album of AAR Flat Car Loads and several load diagrams are among the images. There are a few documenting steel plate loading.

https://realstmfc.groups.io/g/main/album?id=43509


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN


On October 13, 2018 at 6:41 PM Bob Chaparro <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Can anyone direct me to a 1950s era loading diagram or prototype photo for steel plate on a flat car?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




Re: old Southern Pacific movie on Youtube

Paul Doggett
 

Interesting thanks for posting Tim.

Paul Doggett England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿

On 13 Oct 2018, at 19:02, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@comcast.net> wrote:


An amusing little 1931 film "Other Men's Women" about railroad workers
with many wonderful scenes of Southern Pacific steam and freight cars -
and they even staged a real sideswipe collision of a steam locomotive and
an SP caboose! with Jimmy Cagney in a minor bit part! Lots of railroad
jargon. Excellent quality too.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6M64ZlYnJsM

Tim O'Connor



--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


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