Date   

Re: SAL 95000-95699 50 ton 41-6 Gondolas ---- What trucks appropriate???

Schleigh Mike
 

Thank you Tim----

For your truck recommendation.  I agree that the Tichy truck has a sort of 40 ton  'whimpy' look to it, perhaps not appropriate for 50 ton.  I shall look at Richard's comments on where to apply that one.

HOWEVER, having allowed myself the distraction that the Wright-Trak kit purchase brought to my otherwise well-planned and organized modeling efforts, I checked my 1956 yard report and October 1958 ORER that often guide my desires and found in the former, SAL cars 90500 and 93727 bringing Ohio limestone to Potter County, Penna.  The ORER shows these as members of the 90000-90999 and 93000-93999 respective series.  Additionally, there is another series, 94000-94499.  All these car blocks possess the same dimensions and steel floor reference as the 95000 group that is pictured in the kit instructions.  The obvious questions----

Are all these cars represented by the Wright-Trak "Lowside Gondola" kit?

If YES, what build dates apply to the various groups?

Further complication----The kit includes a wood floor.  Obviously not correct.  Is there a ready reference as to what the seam and rivet layout would be for the steel floor?  Drawings or 'top-down' photos? 

I do not have any SAL reference material so I am a bit in a vacuum on these cars.

Thanking anyone and all who may help.

Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna. where spring has effectively arrived.



On Tuesday, March 26, 2019, 5:53:34 PM EDT, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:



Mike,

I have three photos, and each one shows the same trucks - 50 ton Barber S-2-A with the
"ride control"
(or whatever they're called) wedges in the ends of the bolsters. Branchline
did them... Red Caboose did them... maybe Tahoe? Kadee? others?

I like the Tichy "bettendorf" to represent 40 ton trucks... it's a nice looking truck but
it seems a bit undersize.

Tim O'



On 3/26/2019 4:27 PM, Schleigh Mike via Groups.Io wrote:
Hello Group?

This weekend I picked up an un-started Wright-Trak kit for the subject car.  The kit comes with a Tichy truck set but I wonder if there is not a better choice, perhaps from Tahoe.  The photos provided don't help much and there is no text dealing with prototype details.  Can anyone recommend the Tichy or any other truck?

Also, the decal set has several "NEW" dates through the 1950s.  There were 700 cars.  Can the dates be more finely enumerated?

Thanking in advance----Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Ladder material?

Ken Adams
 

I'm looking for a supply of the sharp or acute angled top SP caboose ladders.  No help available from Walthers on spare parts for their SP C-30 caboose. I have bent the Athearn sheet metal stampings in the past but want a proper SP style of styles.

A robust stainless or strong flexible delrin plastic similar to what Kadee uses would be wonderful. Ironic that Kadee does make these for their N scale Microtrains C-30 caboose.

Pierre
I checked both Yarmouth and Elgin sites and did not see any reference/illustration of the former Sylvan ladders to see if they had the right style of style bend.


Transfer Cards

Bob Chaparro
 

Stencil on left-hand door reads "Transfer Cards".

http://lists.railfan.net/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-10-01-18/X5241.jpg

Is this another term for route cards?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Ladder material?

Randy Hammill
 

All gone.

But, when I pulled them out I realized I had the Trout Creek Engineering ones which, if I recall correctly, are the same ones. I think they purchased their line. 

In any event, you can get them direct:


P2002 is the 5 rung version, P2012 is the 4 rung version. $9.00/pair.

They look like this:


Randy

--
Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954

--

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


the Railroad Museum of PA online collection

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I think many of you will enjoy spending a leasurely hour or three browsing thru the Railroad Museum of PA online collection. The search below on the topic of freight cars is particularly rewarding...
 
 
As an example of things to be found, those of us modeling the 1920s will like this walk-around view of twin hopper LV 22824. Click on the thumbnail images for a larger one.
 
 
 
 
 
 

Claus Schlund


Re: PRR gon with some kind of metal product load

Jerome (Jerry) Albin
 

The load looks like truck trailer sides and ends which Budd Company made at Hunting Park. The dinosaur hauling it's doom, so to say.


Re: PRR gon with some kind of metal product load

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Claus,

The background information says this is from the Budd Collection and the location is Hunting Park, which is near Philadelphia and was where Budd had a major manufacturing facility. We may conclude with some certainty that gondola has been loaded up with Budd products. Are they stainless steel? Don't know. Stainless seems odd for building components, but Budd did a lot of really arcane specialist fabrication. Budd also worked other materials, including plastics. The complex load restrainers suggest this load isn't a one-off, and that the retainers would be reused for additional shipments. Note that the following car seems to have more of these restrainers.

I can't quite read the lettering on the side, but think is says "RETURN WHEN EMPTY TO READING CO. ---------- PA." The car is from series 375750-376649, class G31d. Many cars are broken out from in this group have special notes in ORER, but I don't have those pages.

Other ideas?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 3/26/19 3:33 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Some might enjoy seeing this PRR gon with some kind of metal product load, with what might be dedicated metal blocking to support the load.
 
 
Click on the photo for a larger image.
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


Re: Ladder material?

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Yeah, Randy, they do bend, perhaps especially in a ham-handed club environment, but I’ve always been able to bend them back.  I think they are pretty much prototypical thickness, therefore liable to be bent.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Randy Hammill
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 8:38 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Ladder material?

 

The Taurus ones are very nice, but extremely soft and bend way too easily. I probably have a bunch I’ll never use of anybody wants some.

 

Old and Weary Car shops made similar ones for their caboose kits, I think Al still has some. They are like the Taurus ones, but stainless steel so they are much more durable. You can’t really solder them, though.

 

Randy 

--

Randy Hammill

Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954


--

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


Re: Ladder material?

Randy Hammill
 

The Taurus ones are very nice, but extremely soft and bend way too easily. I probably have a bunch I’ll never use of anybody wants some.

Old and Weary Car shops made similar ones for their caboose kits, I think Al still has some. They are like the Taurus ones, but stainless steel so they are much more durable. You can’t really solder them, though.

Randy 

--
Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954

--

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


Re: SAL 95000-95699 50 ton 41-6 Gondolas ---- What trucks appropriate???

Tim O'Connor
 


Mike,

I have three photos, and each one shows the same trucks - 50 ton Barber S-2-A with the
"ride control"
(or whatever they're called) wedges in the ends of the bolsters. Branchline
did them... Red Caboose did them... maybe Tahoe? Kadee? others?

I like the Tichy "bettendorf" to represent 40 ton trucks... it's a nice looking truck but
it seems a bit undersize.

Tim O'



On 3/26/2019 4:27 PM, Schleigh Mike via Groups.Io wrote:
Hello Group?

This weekend I picked up an un-started Wright-Trak kit for the subject car.  The kit comes with a Tichy truck set but I wonder if there is not a better choice, perhaps from Tahoe.  The photos provided don't help much and there is no text dealing with prototype details.  Can anyone recommend the Tichy or any other truck?

Also, the decal set has several "NEW" dates through the 1950s.  There were 700 cars.  Can the dates be more finely enumerated?

Thanking in advance----Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Ladder material?

william darnaby
 

I believe it was Tarus.  I used these on a scratchbuilt Alton and Southern caboose year ago.

 

Bill Darnaby

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Schuyler Larrabee via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 24, 2019 10:02 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Ladder material?

 

Somebody used to make etched caboose ladders.  They were kind of a bear to assemble but you supplied wire to go through the etched stiles and soldered it all together.  The top ends of the stiles were hook-shaped so that the roof end could be bent to make an attachment tab, and since they were to be bent by the modeler, they could be made uneven to sit properly on a sloping or round roof.  I made a bunch of these for the Club’s caboose fleet.  Unfortunately I cannot recall “Somebody’s” name.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of John Sykes III via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 24, 2019 8:53 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Ladder material?

 

You can buy caboose ladders already made with the loop in the top as parts from Athearn.

-- John


Re: PRR gon with some kind of metal product load

spsalso
 

The load looks to be pre-fab metal building walls, loaded in a reusable rack, suitable for crane-lift.

Note that the top edges of the taller pieces are not parallel with the top edges of the shorter, leading me to believe there's a slope for a roof involved.


Ed

Edward Sutorik


SAL 95000-95699 50 ton 41-6 Gondolas ---- What trucks appropriate???

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello Group?

This weekend I picked up an un-started Wright-Trak kit for the subject car.  The kit comes with a Tichy truck set but I wonder if there is not a better choice, perhaps from Tahoe.  The photos provided don't help much and there is no text dealing with prototype details.  Can anyone recommend the Tichy or any other truck?

Also, the decal set has several "NEW" dates through the 1950s.  There were 700 cars.  Can the dates be more finely enumerated?

Thanking in advance----Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.


Re: PRR gon with some kind of metal product load

Schleigh Mike
 

Ah----

The G(no hyphen)31d.  Close to the Tangent model.  Thanks Claus!

Mike Schleigh in Grove City, Penna.



On Tuesday, March 26, 2019, 3:33:52 PM EDT, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) <claus@...> wrote:


Hi List Members,
 
Some might enjoy seeing this PRR gon with some kind of metal product load, with what might be dedicated metal blocking to support the load.
 
 
Click on the photo for a larger image.
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


PRR gon with some kind of metal product load

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Some might enjoy seeing this PRR gon with some kind of metal product load, with what might be dedicated metal blocking to support the load.
 
 
Click on the photo for a larger image.
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund


Re: Op Sessions

David Payne
 

Years ago there was a cartoon in MR depicting a woman at the door of a cabin speaking to her husband while a “bumpkin’” son sat in a rocking chair with a blade of grass clenched in his teeth and eyes closed. She was saying, “I’m so happy Clem has a hobby; he’s modeled an abandoned railroad.” In front of “Clem” was a small display with a locomotive buried in over-growth.
DPayne

PS: I think my layout feels abandoned!


Re: [Ry-ops-industrialSIG] [Proto-Layouts] Op Sessions

Douglas Harding
 

If you really want to get the old goats: provide a few walkers with the built in seats. Or lower the layout and give everyone an office chair. You might find an architects stool on casters that could work. Take the strain off the feet and back during a lull in the action.

 

Cal’s mention of the interlocking squares is good. I’m trying them, but find my office chair does not roll on the tiles, so when doing work under the layout they are a hindrance. I have thought of cutting a Japanese type sandal out of the foam tiles, a piece of Velcro for a strap and you would be set to go. Provide one set for each operator, much cheaper that covering the entire layout room floor, esp for a large layout.

 

I have used the foam backed carpet, get the end roll cast off strips at a big box store. But water issues in two houses have steered me away from the padded carpet. When the floor gets wet the carpet is a real pain.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: Ry-ops-industrialSIG@groups.io [mailto:Ry-ops-industrialSIG@groups.io] On Behalf Of Cal Sexsmith
Sent: Tuesday, March 26, 2019 11:23 AM
To: Proto-Layouts@groups.io; Proto-Layouts@groups.io; REALSTMFC@groups.io; Demetre Argiro; D. Scott Chatfield; Ed Kelly; Jeff Scarbrough; WILLIAM & LINDA GOSSETT; Ivan Jenkins; Michael Mang; gary senesac; Rick Hemingway; Bruce F. Smith; John Rieken; Thomas Klimoski; Mike Turner; Ibleedcrimson@...; aikenair@...; Carl Schmidt; Skipper Crews; Terry Harrison; Saunders Bridges; ry-ops-industrialsig@groups.io
Subject: Re: [Ry-ops-industrialSIG] [Proto-Layouts] Op Sessions

 

Hello Jared:

 

I have not operated on the Alma Branch, although like Bill J it is on my bucket list. It's just that you are a long way away. 

 

I would think that breaking for lunch after arrival at Alma would be both appropriate and prototypical. If you still want to have lunch first a 15 to 20 minute break at that point might be a good idea. Also, what's on your floor? Those interlocking foam tiles certainly ease the foot and back strain when walking on concrete even if it is carpeted. A few strategically placed stools might also help for brief breaks while the train runs between towns. Just don't make them too comfortable :-)

 

Cal Sexsmith

 

Sent from my BlackBerry 10 smartphone on the SaskTel network.

From: Jared Harper

Sent: Monday, March 25, 2019 6:55 PM

To: Proto-Layouts@groups.io; REALSTMFC@groups.io; Demetre Argiro; D. Scott Chatfield; Ed Kelly; Jeff Scarbrough; WILLIAM & LINDA GOSSETT; Ivan Jenkins; Michael Mang; gary senesac; Rick Hemingway; Bruce F. Smith; John Rieken; Thomas Klimoski; Mike Turner; Ibleedcrimson@...; aikenair@...; Carl Schmidt; Skipper Crews; Terry Harrison; Saunders Bridges; ry-ops-industrialsig@groups.io

Reply To: Proto-Layouts@groups.io

Subject: [Proto-Layouts] Op Sessions

 

I have monthly op sessions on my Santa Fe Alma branch layout. My layout is 22 1/2 x 30' with seven stations--Burlingame, Harveyville, Bradford, Eskridge, Hessdale, Allendorph, and Alma. I invite three guys to my home for lunch at noon. After lunch we go to the basment where my three visitors run trains 95/96 the daily except Sunday mixed train filling the functions of engineer, conductor and brakeman.  I am the question answerer, troubleshooter, etc.  I am 74.  The other operators range in age from their 30's to a few years older than I am.  The after lunch op sessions run from about 2 1/2 hours to 4 hours.  As the operating group gets more geezerly our backs, legs and feet start failing us and we start to hurt.  Ways have been discussed on how reduce our physical suffering and maintain our enjoyment.  Several things have bee suggested:

 

1.  The prototype train was an out and back operation  Train 95 went from Burlingame to Alma in the morning.  When their work was done at Alma they ate lunch.  It has been suggested that we follow the prototype's lead, i.e.  have the guys arrive about 10:30, run train 95, and then go upstairs for lunch.  After lunch we can go back to our jobs running train 96.  One of our locals breaks his op session at lunch.  After lunch we return to operating until the ops are finished  Unfortunately some of the crew leaves and with just three crew that doesn't work.

2.  Running train 95  could be one op session  on one day.  Train 96 could run another day in another op session.  Seems to me that would ruin continutiy.

 

Anyway, I would like to hear your suggestions.

 

Jared Harper

 




Re: Op Sessions

mike turner
 

Scott,

You know us way too well.

That hurts. :)

Mike

MP-Z35

On 3/25/2019 10:43 PM, Scott Chatfield wrote:
If your backs and feet and knees hurt too much you could go full-prototype and abandon the line.  Pull up the rails, cover the roadbed with weeds, let the local volunteer fire department burn a depot or elevator for practice (Heather would love watch that!), etc.  Then the old farts could eat lunch then go downstairs and reminisce about the "good old days" when Death Valley Scotty ran the varnish across the Alma Branch at 85 mph or whatever delusions old farts come up with....

Might I suggest a bathroom break after turning the train at Alma.  And some of those interlocking foam floor mats for the area around Burlingame because folks spend a lot of time there standing around scratching their heads....


Scott Chatfield


Re: Op Sessions

D. Scott Chatfield
 

If your backs and feet and knees hurt too much you could go full-prototype and abandon the line.  Pull up the rails, cover the roadbed with weeds, let the local volunteer fire department burn a depot or elevator for practice (Heather would love watch that!), etc.  Then the old farts could eat lunch then go downstairs and reminisce about the "good old days" when Death Valley Scotty ran the varnish across the Alma Branch at 85 mph or whatever delusions old farts come up with....

Might I suggest a bathroom break after turning the train at Alma.  And some of those interlocking foam floor mats for the area around Burlingame because folks spend a lot of time there standing around scratching their heads....


Scott Chatfield


Re: Op Sessions

John Barry
 

Jared,

I would vote for the lunch break option.  We do that at Jeff Mutter's and I don't recall losing many if any guys at the break.  Adjusting your start time to split the session also allows an earlier departure without compromising any of your current scheme as you already have lunch.

John

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736


On Monday, March 25, 2019, 6:55:23 PM EDT, Jared Harper <harperandbrown@...> wrote:


I have monthly op sessions on my Santa Fe Alma branch layout. My layout is 22 1/2 x 30' with seven stations--Burlingame, Harveyville, Bradford, Eskridge, Hessdale, Allendorph, and Alma. I invite three guys to my home for lunch at noon. After lunch we go to the basment where my three visitors run trains 95/96 the daily except Sunday mixed train filling the functions of engineer, conductor and brakeman.  I am the question answerer, troubleshooter, etc.  I am 74.  The other operators range in age from their 30's to a few years older than I am.  The after lunch op sessions run from about 2 1/2 hours to 4 hours.  As the operating group gets more geezerly our backs, legs and feet start failing us and we start to hurt.  Ways have been discussed on how reduce our physical suffering and maintain our enjoyment.  Several things have bee suggested:

1.  The prototype train was an out and back operation  Train 95 went from Burlingame to Alma in the morning.  When their work was done at Alma they ate lunch.  It has been suggested that we follow the prototype's lead, i.e.  have the guys arrive about 10:30, run train 95, and then go upstairs for lunch.  After lunch we can go back to our jobs running train 96.  One of our locals breaks his op session at lunch.  After lunch we return to operating until the ops are finished  Unfortunately some of the crew leaves and with just three crew that doesn't work.
2.  Running train 95  could be one op session  on one day.  Train 96 could run another day in another op session.  Seems to me that would ruin continutiy.

Anyway, I would like to hear your suggestions.

Jared Harper

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