Date   

Re: this nice shot of the GM&O freight house

Tim O'Connor
 


Hub, and Spoke.

Some freight houses dealt largely with interline sorting, as well as
local (more or less random destinations) sorting for further destinations.


On 4/29/2019 7:34 PM, Claus Schlund \(HGM\) wrote:
Hi List Members,
 
Consider for a moment this nice shot of the GM&O freight house surrounded by steam era freight cars...
 
 
I have a question about how this all works regarding delivery of goods to the customer. Freight cars get parked here, they are unloaded into the freight house by fork lift or hand truck or elbow grease, right? Then what? How does the customer get their goods? Presumably they show up wuth their comapny truck (or in earlier days, with their horse-drawn cart). But I don't see any good street access to the building. Is it on the side of the building we cannot see? I'm thinking maybe not, since there are probably tracks there.
 
This is not the first time I've seen freight houses with what appears to be inadequate or non-existant street access. How was this handled? Presumably every inbound carload of items that goes INTO the freight house has to leave as well, and it's not leaving in a freight car, right?
 
Thoughts?
 
Overall, if you omit the large yard in the background, and included only the three tracks in the foreground with the building, a scene like this is very model-genic, and could serve as the focal point of a very nice switching layout or a fun area of activity within a larger layout.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Freight Car Guru

WILLIAM PARDIE
 





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: pardiew001 <pardiew001@...>
Date: 4/29/19 2:03 PM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Freight Car Guru


Has anyone stepped up to be the Union Pacific Freight Car Guru since Terry Metcalf left us?  It has been quite a while but he certainly bought a lot of knowledge and passion to the table.

Biil Pardie


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: Freight Car Guru

Tim O'Connor
 


Dick Harley is my go-to guy for UP freight cars. :-)


On 4/29/2019 8:03 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:

Has anyone stepped up to be the Union Pacific Freight Car Guru since Terry Metcalf left us?  It has been quite a while but he certainly bought a lot of knowledge and passion to the table.

Biil Pardie


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: Cornel University collection

Tim O'Connor
 


we had a switch like that on the NVRRA club layout, semi-gantlet style, made that way to put
the throw rod outside of a tunnel. in the case of the photo, to move the throw rod past the
road way.


On 4/29/2019 6:17 PM, James SANDIFER wrote:

Interesting piece of trackwork.

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20864642

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Monday, April 29, 2019 2:56 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cornel University collection

 

1655 photographs from the US Presidents railroad commission, all in 1960 (I’m assume 1960 inclusive is out cutoff date). All subjects, incl. freight cars.

 

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/?f%5Bcollection_tesim%5D%5B%5D=U.S.+President%27s+Railroad+Commission+Photographs

 

Enjoy.

 

Dave Nelson

 



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: grab iron ladders

Nelson Moyer
 

Are the sheared stiles stiff enough to be stable without the L-channel for support? Also, how did you install the rungs without the L in a jig?

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of gtws00 via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, April 29, 2019 4:08 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] grab iron ladders

 

Clark,
On one car I used Pierre's Brass Stiles and bent the outer end as the usual 90 degree L in a Photo Etch Tool. On the inside one I clamped the hole side into a PETool and bent the side without the hole a few times to shear it off. Clean up with a file if needed and you have nice flat piece of brass stock with holes to match the other side.

George Toman


Re: Cornel University collection

Matt Smith
 

Great shot of freight cars but many more contextual pictures of freight yards, siding, grade crossings etc. Very valuable for modeling even if the subject is not your "home" road.  Thanks for sharing the direct link!
 
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL


Re: grab iron ladders

Nelson Moyer
 

While the partial stiles worked well with 0.010 x 0.020 in. styrene, I don’t think they are strong enough for a full length stile. 0.040 in. is too wide (3.5 in.), but  0.030 might be acceptable (2 5/8 in.), but to get that width, you would have to split 0.060 in. strip in half. 0.015 in. thickness should be OK, but it’s only 1 ¼ in. thick, and the difference between 1 and 1 ¼ in. in HO scale is infinitesimal. 0.010 in. is 7/8 in. in HO scale.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Clark Propst
Sent: Monday, April 29, 2019 4:07 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] grab iron ladders

 

This raises the question, how much can you cheat on material dimensions where scale dimensions are too fragile in modeling  practice? There must be a happy medium between Athearn blue box sill steps and scale fidelity.

 Nelson Moyer

Yes, that's my dilemma. I'm not going to use any styrene strip as thin as .010 or 1 scale inch.But, .020" seems too thick to me. I'm thinking .015x.040? I don't have that size, but will be hitting a HS that does in a couple weeks.


Re: CNW gondola underside / L&N coke boxcar

Steven D Johnson
 

From L&N series 30550-30699, modified by L&N’s South Louisville Shops in 1958-1959 from former NC&StL XM30 class boxcars (NC&StL series 18000-18499, built by Pullman-Standard in 1937). 

 

See four attached photos of cars from that series.  See page 80, top photo, in the L&N Color Guide, Volume One (Morning Sun Books) for a photo of #30633, which has coke loaded in the ends and a small pile of old tires in the center section! 

 

Steve Johnson

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Monday, April 29, 2019 1:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] CNW gondola underside

 


L&N coke box car. The L&N rebuilt a variety of cars for coke service. My Dad photographed
one in Pueblo Colorado (CF&I Steel) in the late 1960's. They probably also made it to Provo,
to the USS Geneva works. Met coal & coke from east of the Mississippi was a common sight in
Colorado, even to the very end of steel making in Colorado.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/29/2019 1:26 PM, Brian Termunde via Groups.Io wrote:

Some nice stuff on the site. You can click on the "X" in the upper right to get to thumbnails of the photos.

 

In doing so, I came across one car and I was wondering if it is the prototype of Walthers "Jailbox" car?

 

https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-6Mf2Vm5/A

And Thanks for sharing the link Gary!

 

Take Care,

 

Brian R. Termunde

Midvale, Utah

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Freight Car Guru

WILLIAM PARDIE
 


Has anyone stepped up to be the Union Pacific Freight Car Guru since Terry Metcalf left us?  It has been quite a while but he certainly bought a lot of knowledge and passion to the table.

Biil Pardie


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: this nice shot of the GM&O freight house

John Barry
 

Claus,

Think FedEx's Memphis or UPS's Louisville sorting hubs, neither of which has much in local delivery compared to the overall volume. Kansas City was a major rail hub with significant interchange between RRs. LCL cars from all over the GM&O terminated there an their contents were resorted into interchange cars destined to points on connecting lines. A package from Mobile to Albuquerque would have moved through this house to the Santa Fe house at Argentine before entering the Santa Fe LCL system. Only in a minority of markets was there enough traffic to warrent a through car such as the NY car from San Francisco via the Santa Fe and Erie. Through cars to connecting lines were a bit more common skipping the destination sort on the originating line. But most of the transfer LCL got sorted by the delivery road then again by the receiving road. Think trap cars instead of trucks for the cross town moves.

John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA


707-490-9696 


PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736

--------------------------------------------

On Mon, 4/29/19, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) <claus@hellgatemodels.com> wrote:

Subject: [RealSTMFC] this nice shot of the GM&O freight house
To: "STMFC" <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Monday, April 29, 2019, 7:34 PM








Hi List
Members,
 
Consider for a moment this
nice shot of the
GM&O freight house surrounded by steam era freight
cars...
 
https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20988173
 
I have a question about how
this all works
regarding delivery of goods to the customer. Freight cars
get parked here, they
are unloaded into the freight house by fork lift or hand
truck or elbow grease,
right? Then what? How does the customer get their goods?
Presumably they show up
wuth their comapny truck (or in earlier days, with their
horse-drawn cart). But
I don't see any good street access to the building. Is
it on the side of the
building we cannot see? I'm thinking maybe not, since
there are probably tracks
there.
 
This is not the first time
I've seen freight houses
with what appears to be inadequate or non-existant street
access. How was this
handled? Presumably every inbound carload of items that goes
INTO the freight
house has to leave as well, and it's not leaving in a
freight car,
right?
 
Thoughts?
 
Overall, if you omit the
large yard in the
background, and included only the three tracks in the
foreground with the
building, a scene like this is very model-genic, and could
serve as the focal
point of a very nice switching layout or a fun area of
activity within a larger
layout.
 
Claus Schlund


Re: this nice shot of the GM&O freight house

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 4/29/2019 4:34 PM, Claus Schlund &#92;(HGM&#92;) wrote:
Then what? How does the customer get their goods? Presumably they show up wuth their comapny truck (or in earlier days, with their horse-drawn cart)

    At the left of the warehouse is a road on the back.  You can see a truck there.  I believe the curve of the track there is a allusion you can't see well and the road and loading area is there.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


this nice shot of the GM&O freight house

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Consider for a moment this nice shot of the GM&O freight house surrounded by steam era freight cars...
 
 
I have a question about how this all works regarding delivery of goods to the customer. Freight cars get parked here, they are unloaded into the freight house by fork lift or hand truck or elbow grease, right? Then what? How does the customer get their goods? Presumably they show up wuth their comapny truck (or in earlier days, with their horse-drawn cart). But I don't see any good street access to the building. Is it on the side of the building we cannot see? I'm thinking maybe not, since there are probably tracks there.
 
This is not the first time I've seen freight houses with what appears to be inadequate or non-existant street access. How was this handled? Presumably every inbound carload of items that goes INTO the freight house has to leave as well, and it's not leaving in a freight car, right?
 
Thoughts?
 
Overall, if you omit the large yard in the background, and included only the three tracks in the foreground with the building, a scene like this is very model-genic, and could serve as the focal point of a very nice switching layout or a fun area of activity within a larger layout.
 
Claus Schlund
 
 


Re: Cornel University collection

Eric Hansmann
 

This avoids setting the points in the street crossing. I’ll have to remember this for a future application.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of James SANDIFER
Sent: Monday, April 29, 2019 5:17 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Cornel University collection

 

Interesting piece of trackwork.

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20864642

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Monday, April 29, 2019 2:56 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cornel University collection

 

1655 photographs from the US Presidents railroad commission, all in 1960 (I’m assume 1960 inclusive is out cutoff date). All subjects, incl. freight cars.

 

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/?f%5Bcollection_tesim%5D%5B%5D=U.S.+President%27s+Railroad+Commission+Photographs

 

Enjoy.

 

Dave Nelson

 


Re: NJI&I Boxcar

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Peter,

I don't know the answer to your question, but it would be quite a while. Each of the two cars chained to the floor would have to be unchained, then worked out with a swiveling jack. Then the two cars in the diagonal racks would be lowered, unchained, and likewise worked out the door with the jack. How long might depend on how many men there were to do tasks simultaneously, but I would expect at least an hour or more per boxcar.

The car in question is a apparently in a parts pool, so the above does not apply. If "GM-1" is correct as was suggested, then it probably means "General Motors pool #1". Likely it had racks for some sort of sub-assemblies, say frames, motors, transmissions, body stampings, etc. The ends on this car mark it as 10' IH. This number does not show in my 1958 ORER, and likely post-dates our period, at least as an NJI&I-lettered car.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 4/29/19 5:03 PM, Peter Hall wrote:
Just out of curiosity, how long would it take to load or unload autos into or out of an automobile box car equipped with auto racks, in the 1945-1950 era?

Thanks
Pete

On Apr 29, 2019, at 12:48 PM, Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...> wrote:


Either an appliance or automobile parts pool assignment. Usually a good indicator that the
car has special equipment or loading devices - could be as simple as pallets that stayed with
the car. In the auto industry the pool assignment stencils were frequently changed.

Tim O'Connor


On 4/29/2019 4:23 AM, Garth Groff wrote:
Friends,

While skimming through the Ed Wilkommen photos, I noted this view which included an NJI&I boxcar: https://www.lakestatesarchive.org/Ed-Wilkommen-Collection/Freight-Cars/i-r5ZmB9k/A . Besides being a rather rare roadname in its own right, I was struck by the initials above the reporting marks. They look like "GN-I" or GH-I". Any comments about what they mean?

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts



Re: grab iron ladders

Bill Welch
 

Although it is a bit oversize I use .010 x .030 styrene strip. Because it can be wiggly I tape in down on cardboard and use a .05 ink pen to mark where the holes should be drilled. I use a Flex-I-File scriber to dimple the styrene gently where I will drill then drill w/.79 bit. After it attached to the end I may apply some sort of attachment like a NBW or harvested rivet. If it is an NBW I will cut that part from the attachment rod and blue directly onto the stile to avoid drilling more holes

Bill Welch


Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

Dennis Storzek
 

On Mon, Apr 29, 2019 at 11:47 AM, Denny Anspach wrote:
Would  this be  the Manufacturer’s Railway reportedly out of St. Louis or the similarly named railroad that switched the Western Electric Hawthorne works in Cicero, IL?  (the latter owned by AT&T?).
Denny, the switching lne in Cicero, IL was the Manufacturers Junction Ry.

Dennis Storzek
 


Re: Cornel University collection

Steve SANDIFER
 

Interesting piece of trackwork.

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/catalog/ss:20864642

 

 

J. Stephen Sandifer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Monday, April 29, 2019 2:56 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Cornel University collection

 

1655 photographs from the US Presidents railroad commission, all in 1960 (I’m assume 1960 inclusive is out cutoff date). All subjects, incl. freight cars.

 

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/?f%5Bcollection_tesim%5D%5B%5D=U.S.+President%27s+Railroad+Commission+Photographs

 

Enjoy.

 

Dave Nelson

 


Re: grab iron ladders

Paul Woods <paul@...>
 

Very true; in the full-size world, bits for drilling sheet metal are made as a series of shallow steps gradually getting larger and larger, effectively giving a long, sharply pointed bit.  Unfortunately we don't have drill bits of that type available to us in sizes small enough for our purposes, but there are a couple of ways it can be done.  Clamping the brass strip between two pieces of hardwood will prevent the metal from 'picking up' and distorting, although this is only practical when it is set up as a proper jig with guides to keep everything lined up because it is impossible to see what's going on between the blocks.  It is preferable to have at least a drill press for this, and a mill is ideal.  The other method is to use a rotary burr such as a ball-end, conical or flame-style.  These do not bite into the metal like a spiral drill-bit will, and the neat thing with the tapered styles of burr is you can adjust the diameter of the hole by how far you push them in - the fact that the burr is cutting a tapered hole really doesn't matter when the metal is so thin.  I have used this to get me out of the cactus a few times when I have already glued fine brass strapping detail to a wood-bodied model, only to discover that I had forgotten several holes.  It pays to use a piece of hardwood under the metal for this method if you can, otherwise you can still distort it when pushing on the burr to get it started.  Also, once it is beginning to cut through, back the pressure right off otherwise the sides of the strip where the metal is thinnest will bulge out sideways....sounds like experience talking, dunnit?  Dremel sells a wide range of suitable small burrs, and there are lots of other brands around.  My favourite is Dremel #9909 tungsten carbide cutter, nasty little beast if you accidentally stick it in your finger but by golly it cuts through brass and nickel-silver well.

Regards
Paul Woods
Whangarei, NZ
NYCSHS #7172

>0.005 in. brass would be hard to drill without distortion...."
>
>Nelson Moyer


Re: Manufacturers Railway Mather box

Tony Thompson
 

Denny Anspach wrote:

Would  this be  the Manufacturer’s Railway reportedly out of St. Louis or the similarly named railroad that switched the Western Electric Hawthorne works in Cicero, IL?  (the latter owned by AT&T?).

       The St. Louis one, owned by Anheuser-Busch. I have one of the MRS Mather box cars on my layout, and it delivers animal feed (spent malt) to a local farmer. I know the car is accurate because Richard Henrickson went to a lot of trouble over all the Mather cars.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history






Re: Cornel University collection

Tim O'Connor
 

Dave

I just assumed everyone knew about this photo collection - many of them are stunning, wonderful, and rare.

They were (mostly?) taken by railroad workers - union members - to document their craft and working conditions.
At the time railroads were trying very hard to downsize crews and eliminate yard jobs.

Tim O'Connor



On 4/29/2019 3:56 PM, Dave Nelson wrote:

1655 photographs from the US Presidents railroad commission, all in 1960 (I’m assume 1960 inclusive is out cutoff date). All subjects, incl. freight cars.

 

https://digital.library.cornell.edu/?f%5Bcollection_tesim%5D%5B%5D=U.S.+President%27s+Railroad+Commission+Photographs

 

Enjoy.

 

Dave Nelson



--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

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