Date   

Free shipping-10 new GN 40' steel box car kits by Intermountain HO

Andy Carlson
 



Hello folks-
For an average of less than $9 each, with shipping.

I have 10 new Great Northern HO box car kits, all 40'cars, and all GN. Mint, new Intermountain kits, they are as follows-

1) IM #41001-26 GN 12 panel as-delivered mineral red scheme w/lg sideways goat medallion
2) IM #41001-28
3) IM #41001-29
4) IM  #41001-27
5) IM # GN-12 special run 37 AAR boxcar mineral red w/lg sideways goat
6) IM #48453-10 40' PS-1 mineral red lg sideways goat
7) IM #48453-06
8) IM #48453-07
9) IM #48453-08
10) IM #48453-11

These cars are all mineral red, and are in schemes for these box cars when they were delivered new. These would be useful for late 1940's era, up until the merger if heavy weathering were applied. all 10 cars have different numbers. 5 12 panels, 4 PS-1's and 1 '37 AAR (though GN got some '37 AAR 40'box cars as leases, these were after 1960, so for our era, bogus).

Offered for $88, and shipping is included to the US. I accept checks and money orders. With a small fee PayPal is accepted, as well.

If interested, contact me off-list at <midcentury at sbcglobal dot net>
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: End Mill Advice for ABS

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sat, Apr 20, 2019 at 07:24 AM, Todd Horton wrote:
A reverse helix cutter will push the material down instead of trying to lift it.  I think Harvey Tool Company has these.  They sell very small tools.  I’ve used a .004 diameter cutter from them in the past making medical parts.     Todd Horton 
This is true... but the cutting forces are still liable to make the plastic part bounce, and gouge the part with the end of the cutter on the upstroke of the bounce.

The hardest thing with machining on one piece body shells is holding the darned things. You can't squeeze them in a vise without crushing them. Trying to clamp an open hopper in a vise with the top chords against one jaw and the hoppers against the other is just asking to have the sides bow, either up or down, doesn't matter, the plane of the side you are trying to match is no longer a flat surface.

Best strategy is to build a fixture that holds a block that fits into the body and provides clearance for the other side; this is how our pad printing fixtures work, directly supporting the side being printed. The fixture can have notches machined into it to clear internal features of the plastic body shell, which can then be held in place with double faced tape. Use the strongest grip tape you can get; isopropyl alcohol will normally dissolve the adhesive without hurting the plastic to free the part.

When machining plastic, always use new, sharp cutters.Cutters that have been used on metal will not cut as good and are more likely to melt the plastic.

Dennis Storzek


Re: End Mill Advice for ABS

Todd Horton
 

A reverse helix cutter will push the material down instead of trying to lift it.  I think Harvey Tool Company has these.  They sell very small tools.  I’ve used a .004 diameter cutter from them in the past making medical parts.     Todd Horton 


On Apr 20, 2019, at 6:59 AM, Donald B. Valentine via Groups.Io <riverman_vt@...> wrote:

    One can still use an end cutting mill with a bit more care and without such a problem in the mill "lifting"
the piece one is working on. As has been pointed out, the greatest problem is anchoring the piece being
worked on solidly.

   To each there own, Don Valentine


Re: is there a prototype for the paint scheme on the Carnation reefer?

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi Doug,
 
Good point, I had not noticed that.
 
Claus Schlund
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Friday, April 19, 2019 3:26 PM
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] is there a prototype for the paint scheme on the Carnation reefer?

Actually Claus, your photo showing Carnation cars is taken at a different plant in a different state. Your photo is labeled as Berlin Wisconsin, the photo I linked is Oregon Illinois. Pacific Coast Condensed Milk had numerous plants around the country. It was actually started in the state of Washington in 1899 by EA Stuart. The name was changed to Carnation at a later time, but I suspect the lettering painted on buildings stayed for some time.

 

Here are a couple of links with information about the company.

 

https://www.milkproductsinc.com/aboutMilkProducts/companyHistory

https://carnationfarms.org/our-story/

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, April 19, 2019 9:27 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] is there a prototype for the paint scheme on the Carnation reefer?

 

Hi List Members,

 

Thanks everyone for letting me know I'm having a bad link day... sigh.

 

Perhaps we can try this without links - I will attach the images instead.

 

Attached are images of...

 

* the Athearn model

 

* Carnation prototype wood reefers - note the prototype image was taken at the same location as the photo linked by Doug Harding, but it is a different photo than Doug's showing the plant from a different vantage point.

 

* the drawing from Burlington Bulletin 28 page 26

 

Claus Schlund

 


Re: End Mill Advice for ABS

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

    One can still use an end cutting mill with a bit more care and without such a problem in the mill "lifting"
the piece one is working on. As has been pointed out, the greatest problem is anchoring the piece being
worked on solidly.

   To each there own, Don Valentine


Re: is there a prototype for the paint scheme on the Carnation reefer?

Richard Townsend
 

I mis-spoke (wrote) earlier when I said the Athearn reefer had two milk cans. Obviously there is only one. I am away from home and was working from memory. I have two of the Athearn cars and I do recall, accurately I believe, that there are subtle variations in the lettering on the cans. I think one version says “irradiated” and the other doesn’t.


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Varney Metal Freight Car Kits

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Friends,

Are the Varney metal boxcars reasonably close to AAR 1932 standard dimensions? I know they are in many ways crude, and there are better alternatives today (F&C resin and Atlas). Those dimensions would also make the Varney refrigerator cars correct.

If I ever found the State of Maine car at a train show I would probably snap it up. Otherwise, they are not of much use to me. I'm just curious.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 4/19/19 10:21 PM, rwitt_2000 via Groups.Io wrote:
Bob C.

I have the State of Maine one. I was always intrigued by the fact these Varney cars had separate ladders and handholds. Seemed more realistic than the cast-on ones on the all-plastic kits. I recall someone selling the Varney ladders in bulk. I think I purchased several dozen. I still have them somewhere.

Regards,

Bob Witt


Re: End Mill Advice for ABS

mark_landgraf
 

Depending on how flat the back of the resin casting is, you can use double sided carpet tape to hold the part down while you are machining it. Use a window razor scrapper to get under the part and pop it loose. Warning, not all tape adhesive is created equal. A friend of mine that commercially machines a lot of ABS tried about 2 dozen different brands before settling on some that was made in TX. Really sticky is hard to pop loose. Not so sticky doesn't hold well enough to get the job done. 

There are carbide single flute router bits that are used in engraving machines that are designed to cut plastic. These would work well in the high RPM Drexel tools. 

Mark Landgraf


On Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 11:05 PM, Dennis Storzek
<destorzek@...> wrote:
On Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 03:41 PM, dh30973 wrote:
Dremel offers a .125 diameter solid carbide router bit with 20+ flutes that does not cut on the end. It cuts plastic very well (for removing Freight Car details). The great advantage of it not cutting on the end, is you can set it on a surface to remove a detail without damaging the surrounding surface.
I agree with this. The biggest problem with trying to cut on a molded carbody is they can't be clamped very rigidly. The spiral cutter flutes will tend to pull the part up, and get it to vibrating. The side of the end mill will cut, but so will the end, in places you don't really want. The Dremel cutter (typically called a burr at an industrial supply house) avoids that as t presents a smooth flat surface to the part it's passing over. Just be careful not to run it so fast that it melts the side under the end. Water as a cutting fluid helps.

.Dennis Storzek


Re: End Mill Advice for ABS

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Apr 19, 2019 at 03:41 PM, dh30973 wrote:
Dremel offers a .125 diameter solid carbide router bit with 20+ flutes that does not cut on the end. It cuts plastic very well (for removing Freight Car details). The great advantage of it not cutting on the end, is you can set it on a surface to remove a detail without damaging the surrounding surface.
I agree with this. The biggest problem with trying to cut on a molded carbody is they can't be clamped very rigidly. The spiral cutter flutes will tend to pull the part up, and get it to vibrating. The side of the end mill will cut, but so will the end, in places you don't really want. The Dremel cutter (typically called a burr at an industrial supply house) avoids that as t presents a smooth flat surface to the part it's passing over. Just be careful not to run it so fast that it melts the side under the end. Water as a cutting fluid helps.

.Dennis Storzek


Re: Throwback Tuesday: Varney Metal Freight Car Kits

rwitt_2000
 

Bob C.

I have the State of Maine one. I was always intrigued by the fact these Varney cars had separate ladders and handholds. Seemed more realistic than the cast-on ones on the all-plastic kits. I recall someone selling the Varney ladders in bulk. I think I purchased several dozen. I still have them somewhere.

Regards,

Bob Witt


SOLD: Duane Buck Painted OMI GN MoW flatcar w/ signature

Andy Carlson
 

This flat car has been sold.
Thanks,
-Andy

Hello-

I have a special maintenance of way Great Northern Flat car. Duane Buck recognized the accuracy of an Overland Models UP flat car. By adding rails and end beams, Duane made an accurate model of GN X 65368, a company service flat used for shipping locomotives and rolling stock after wrecks.

Offered for $129, shipping of $10 added for the US.  I accept checks and money orders. With a small fee, PayPal is accepted. Contact me off-list for more (and better) pictures at <midcentury@...>
thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Re: End Mill Advice for ABS

dh30973
 

Dremel offers a .125 diameter solid carbide router bit with 20+ flutes that does not cut on the end. It cuts plastic very well (for removing Freight Car details). The great advantage of it not cutting on the end, is you can set it on a surface to remove a detail without damaging the surrounding surface.

Dave Hussey


Dropped the Box Sale - Workbench Copies

qmp211
 


Two boxes of books slid off the 2-wheeler.
 
As a result, the following books are for sale with dented corners:
 
The Burlington Waycars
1 copy @ $70 each plus $12 dollars USPS media mail - all 4 corners
3 copies @ $80 each plus $12 dollars USPS media mail - 2-3 corners
 
The Burlington In Transition
4 copies @ $40 each plus $10 dollars USPS media mail- all 4 corners
4 copies @ $50 each plus $10 dollars USPS media mail - 2-3 corners
 
Bindings tight, dust jacket may be scratched or torn.
 

PayPal invoice, Credit Card by phone, money order or check.

Inquiries OFF LIST

Regards,

Randy Danniel
milepost206
at
mchsi
dot
com

MILE POST 206 PUBLISHING
PO BOX 543
WEST BURLINGTON IA 52655-0543

 


Re: End Mill Advice for ABS

Benjamin Hom
 



Matt Goodman asked:
"Here’s my ask: I’m looking for advice on an appropriate end mill cutter type for use on plastic. My limited experience with milling has been confined to aluminum and brass, and on projects where surface finish wasn’t a driving factor.

I suspect I would need four flute, relatively small diameter mill to reduce bite and the possibility of tearing?  Advice on that and other related guidance is greatly welcome."

There were two articles in the hobby press along these lines to heavily kitbash HO scale model hoppers.  The first was Brady McGuire's "PRR H25 'Sawtooth' Quad Hopper" in the August 1981 issue of Railroad Model Craftsman, which detailed kitbashing PRR Class H25 quad hoppers by extensively kitbashing HO Athearn offset quad hoppers by milling the sides smooth, cutting away and correcting the orientation of the hoppers, and adding new side posts and end details.  The other article is John Munson's "N&W H-4 Modeling: Athearn Twin to N&W Triple Hopper" from the February 1986 issue of Mainline Modeler and reprinted in Volume 3 of The Best of Mainline Modeler Freight Cars.  Munson kitbashed these cars using the Athearn composite twin and used the mill to remove material to reduce the width of the panels to get closer to the correct length of the car.


Ben Hom


Re: End Mill Advice for ABS Plastic

Matt Goodman
 

Hi Jeff.  The first car will definitely be an experiment - both with the model and tooling/setup. With new side ribbing (vertical and horizontal), a change to the arch ends and other above-the-sill changes, I hope to get to at least a passing resemblance.

My medium-term goal is to build a train that resembles one in a 1936 aerial photo that shows a nice variety of gondolas, short/high 55t HPs and long/low 70t HUs - and a nice variety of coal grades in each.

But first, I need to cut those H2a ribs off! 

Matt Goodman
Columbus Ohio, US

On Apr 19, 2019, at 5:18 PM, Jeff Coleman <traininsp@...> wrote:

Matt

The HU was rebuilt and reclassified H3. Similar to H2/H2a but none look anything like the HU.
I've been wishing for that hopper 35 years. 

Jeff Coleman

On Fri, Apr 19, 2019, 4:48 PM Matt Goodman via Groups.Io <mgoodman312=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all.  I recently purchased a set of BLI N&W H2a hopper cars with the intent of back-dating them to something resembling an HU. Based on what I know, H2a’s are identical to H2s, which were rebuilt HUs.  So I figure the car is as good as any for a starting point, from a dimensions point of view.  Back dating the three hoppers to four might be a problem, but I’m ignoring that minor detail for now.

One of the back-dating steps is removing the vertical side ribs - the HU had fewer side panels than their offspring. I’m considering doing that with my mill.  Here’s my ask: I’m looking for advice on an appropriate end mill cutter type for use on plastic. My limited experience with milling has been confined to aluminum and brass, and on projects where surface finish wasn’t a driving factor.

I suspect I would need four flute, relatively small diameter mill to reduce bite and the possibility of tearing?  Advice on that and other related guidance is greatly welcome.

Matt Goodman
Columbus Ohio US




Re: End Mill Advice for ABS

Jeff Coleman
 

Matt

The HU was rebuilt and reclassified H3. Similar to H2/H2a but none look anything like the HU.
I've been wishing for that hopper 35 years. 

Jeff Coleman

On Fri, Apr 19, 2019, 4:48 PM Matt Goodman via Groups.Io <mgoodman312=icloud.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all.  I recently purchased a set of BLI N&W H2a hopper cars with the intent of back-dating them to something resembling an HU. Based on what I know, H2a’s are identical to H2s, which were rebuilt HUs.  So I figure the car is as good as any for a starting point, from a dimensions point of view.  Back dating the three hoppers to four might be a problem, but I’m ignoring that minor detail for now.

One of the back-dating steps is removing the vertical side ribs - the HU had fewer side panels than their offspring. I’m considering doing that with my mill.  Here’s my ask: I’m looking for advice on an appropriate end mill cutter type for use on plastic. My limited experience with milling has been confined to aluminum and brass, and on projects where surface finish wasn’t a driving factor.

I suspect I would need four flute, relatively small diameter mill to reduce bite and the possibility of tearing?  Advice on that and other related guidance is greatly welcome.

Matt Goodman
Columbus Ohio US



End Mill Advice for ABS

Matt Goodman
 

Hi all. I recently purchased a set of BLI N&W H2a hopper cars with the intent of back-dating them to something resembling an HU. Based on what I know, H2a’s are identical to H2s, which were rebuilt HUs. So I figure the car is as good as any for a starting point, from a dimensions point of view. Back dating the three hoppers to four might be a problem, but I’m ignoring that minor detail for now.

One of the back-dating steps is removing the vertical side ribs - the HU had fewer side panels than their offspring. I’m considering doing that with my mill. Here’s my ask: I’m looking for advice on an appropriate end mill cutter type for use on plastic. My limited experience with milling has been confined to aluminum and brass, and on projects where surface finish wasn’t a driving factor.

I suspect I would need four flute, relatively small diameter mill to reduce bite and the possibility of tearing? Advice on that and other related guidance is greatly welcome.

Matt Goodman
Columbus Ohio US


Re: Yeah, More Resin Coming

Paul Woods <paul@...>
 

Gents

I support Claus and Charlie; I too looked at the website soon after it was announced, and I believe the first release of the website did not mention what scale the kits were.  Since the site owner appears to have access in some way to what is said on this group, I will also make the comment that even now, the updated version does not make it particularly obvious what scale the kits are either - you have to read for quite a bit before encountering any mention of the scale.  It is far more user-friendly to be able to see at a glance the most relevant points concerning scale, era etc. in the title, not buried in the body of the description. 

In the same vein, it perhaps also needs to be clearer that the user must supply an Intermountain boxcar, by using bold text, underlining, colour highlight or suchlike.  After years of communicating information to people 'on the shop floor' who were building the ships that I was designing, I can speak from hard experience that it is just making life hard for yourself to assume everyone will pick out the important bits from what is written in front of them.

FWIW, I don't model in HO, and I have made life a bit harder for myself by restricting my era to pre-WW2, but I nevertheless find it very helpful in extending my knowledge when manufacturers, who have hopefully done their research quite carefully, include details of the era that a particular model/product are applicable to.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ
NYCSHS #7172


Nscale markings

Andy Carlson
 

Only a pet peeve, but I find ioften in my postings of items for sale over the years that there are often some zellots who seem to fill their life's mission by asking "what Scale" for items with no mentioned scale. Aside from their latent wish to have more N scale items offered, I feel this is their way of bullying. People, if a scale is not mentioned, ASSUME that it is the defacto HO item.

-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Resin car Works kit update

Eric Hansmann
 

A Resin Car Works kit update has been posted to the RCW blog. A couple of new kits are coming soon.

http://blog.resincarworks.com/april-rcw-kit-updates/

 

 

Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy

 

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