Date   
Re: PRR 503530

Bruce Smith
 

Al,

Correct, This was an expedited on-line LCL service that included trucks for pick-up and delivery.  Cars were painted in a special paint scheme.

Phase 1 - Aluminum band, white trim, circle keystone (8/47-1/50)
Phase 2 - white band, circle keystone (1/50-5/54)
Phase 3 - white band, shadow keystone (5/54-11/57)

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jul 5, 2017, at 8:57 AM, Al Kresse water.kresse@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Merchandise Service +Less than Car Load Service of the 1950's??  Two tone paint job to advertise the service?


Al Kresse


Re: PRR 503530

Dennis Storzek
 

Well, it's spotted at a PRR freighthouse, so that would be my conclusion.


---In STMFC@..., <thecitrusbelt@...> wrote :

Another photo from the Barriger Library:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15604835363/in/dateposted/

 

Is this an X29 in merchandise service? I believe the car number is 503530.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: PRR 503530

Al Kresse <water.kresse@...>
 

Merchandise Service +Less than Car Load Service of the 1950's??  Two tone paint job to advertise the service?


Al Kresse

On July 5, 2017 at 8:59 AM "'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Well Bob,


Given that it is lettered “MERCHANDISE SERVICE” and is at a PRR freight house… I’d have to give you a thumbs up on that one ;)  Nice X31A parked behind it as well. Of course, the caveat has to be that Merchandise Service cars were often used for other purposes later in life, but this certainly appears to fit the bill.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jul 5, 2017, at 1:48 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
Another photo from the Barriger Library:
Is this an X29 in merchandise service? I believe the car number is 503530.
Bob Chaparro

 


 

Re: PRR 503530

Bruce Smith
 

Well Bob,

Given that it is lettered “MERCHANDISE SERVICE” and is at a PRR freight house… I’d have to give you a thumbs up on that one ;)  Nice X31A parked behind it as well. Of course, the caveat has to be that Merchandise Service cars were often used for other purposes later in life, but this certainly appears to fit the bill.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jul 5, 2017, at 1:48 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
Another photo from the Barriger Library:
Is this an X29 in merchandise service? I believe the car number is 503530.
Bob Chaparro

Re: Item On PFE Reefer Roof

Bill Welch
 

I am pretty sure it is a Hatch Rest meant to protect the roof from being damaged by the hardware on the surface of the hatch.

Bill Welch

PRR 503530

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Another photo from the Barriger Library:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15604835363/in/dateposted/

 

Is this an X29 in merchandise service? I believe the car number is 503530.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Item On PFE Reefer Roof

thecitrusbelt@...
 

In this photo from the Barriger Library I noticed items near the end of the roof paralleling the roof ribs:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/15541481269/in/dateposted/

 

The other reefer also has them. Is this some sort of stop for a fully open bunker hatch or does it serve some other purpose?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Two more Gondolas with coiled end corrugations Plus a Hutchins end Gon

John Barry
 

Dennis, Ray, 

Thank you both!  

Checking the Jan 45 ORER, the post war depletion had yet to occur with the following:

CIL 31000, GB, 292 cars
CIL 32400, GS, 743
CIL 33300, GS, 233

SOO 63801, GB, 496 wood floor, 1 steel floor
SOO 7001, GB, 249 

The inward facing pressings on the 7001 series reduced the inside length and capacity compared to the other cars 40'10 vice 41'6 for the rest with a commensurate reduction in cubic capacity.

For my Christmas 44 layout, it seems reasonable that I could see one of the 1268 Monon or 746 SOO cars.

It could be an interesting model.

John
 
John Barry
 
ATSF North Bay Lines 
Golden Gates & Fast Freights 
Lovettsville, VA

707-490-9696 

PO Box 44736 
Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "destorzek@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Tuesday, July 4, 2017 8:27 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Two more Gondolas with coiled end corrugations Plus a Hutchins end Gon

 



---In STMFC@..., wrote :

These can be considered THE standard Monon freight car for the steam era; nearly a quarter (1476 of 6184 freight cars) of their entire freight car fleet in 1930 was made up of these cars, which were essentially "Improved USRA" clones.

31000-31299 - built by the CI&L shops, 1922
32400-33299 - built 1923
33300-33599 - built by Pullman, 7/1923

The cars mostly didn't survive WWII, with only 525 of the cars left in 1945. Per the Monon's 1947 diagram book, only a few were left as captive service stone cars in the 4601-4716 series, with none at all showing up in the revenue roster.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL
==============================

I've been away for a couple days, just catching up, had to read thro! ugh to see how the turnout discussion turned out :-)

There were two more groups of gondolas built with these ends:

500 tight bottom cars (GB) built by Haskell & Barker in 1921 as Lot 5209 for the Clarkson Coal Mining Co. These cars went to the Soo Line in 1927 as 63801-64799 (odd numbers only).

250 tight bottom cars (GB) built by Pullman Car & Manufacturing Co. (the former Haskell & Barker Michigan City plant) in 1923 as Lot 5345 for the Soo Line, numbered 7001-7499 (odd numbers only). 

Between the two groups, the end pressings faced inward on the 1921 cars, outward on the 1923 order.

I suspect this was a Haskell & Barker proprietary end. When I was organizing the H&B drawing collection at the Pullman Library, I found more information on these ends than on any others; detailed drawings of the pressings that I seem to recall were marked as being for the pressing dies.

I do not recall any other lots using this end, unless some other road ordered just ends for a home shop car building program, this would see! m to be the total of cars using this end.

Dennis Storzek




 




Poultry Car Decals

nvrr49@...
 

I have an Ambroid Poultry Car kit that I picked up at an estate sale, and the decals are missing.  Anybody know of any that might be available?  I have a standing search on eBay, but nothing coming up.  I could piece them together, but I really don't want to do that.


Kent Hurley in KC, MO

nvrr49.blogspot.com

Re: Two more Gondolas with coiled end corrugations Plus a Hutchins end Gon

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <rtbsvrr69@...> wrote :

These can be considered THE standard Monon freight car for the steam era; nearly a quarter (1476 of 6184 freight cars) of their entire freight car fleet in 1930 was made up of these cars, which were essentially "Improved USRA" clones.

31000-31299 - built by the CI&L shops, 1922
32400-33299 - built 1923
33300-33599 - built by Pullman, 7/1923

The cars mostly didn't survive WWII, with only 525 of the cars left in 1945. Per the Monon's 1947 diagram book, only a few were left as captive service stone cars in the 4601-4716 series, with none at all showing up in the revenue roster.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL
==============================

I've been away for a couple days, just catching up, had to read through to see how the turnout discussion turned out :-)

There were two more groups of gondolas built with these ends:

500 tight bottom cars (GB) built by Haskell & Barker in 1921 as Lot 5209 for the Clarkson Coal Mining Co. These cars went to the Soo Line in 1927 as 63801-64799 (odd numbers only).

250 tight bottom cars (GB) built by Pullman Car & Manufacturing Co. (the former Haskell & Barker Michigan City plant) in 1923 as Lot 5345 for the Soo Line, numbered 7001-7499 (odd numbers only). 

Between the two groups, the end pressings faced inward on the 1921 cars, outward on the 1923 order.

I suspect this was a Haskell & Barker proprietary end. When I was organizing the H&B drawing collection at the Pullman Library, I found more information on these ends than on any others; detailed drawings of the pressings that I seem to recall were marked as being for the pressing dies.

I do not recall any other lots using this end, unless some other road ordered just ends for a home shop car building program, this would seem to be the total of cars using this end.

Dennis Storzek




 


Re: sweeteners and tank cars

ron christensen
 

My Uncle and his son were Milwaukee engineers at the plant.About 1953 I road the switcher with my uncle.
They also used a board with handles at the back side what a man used to guide the board and move corn out of the ends of the boxcar, this was pulled by a winch. Maybe before the shaker. They never had a tipping platform like Quacker Oats had on the other side of town. The Rock had track in the plant by the river with a connection to the Milwaukee.
Ron Christensen

Re: Steam Loco Serial Numbers

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <mike_schleigh@...> wrote :



Baldwin built 2-10-0-- Soo Line 950, earlier DSS&A 600--On display in Ashland, Wisconsin, built in 1900.
=========================
Err, no. This engine was built by Baldwin in 1900, builder's number 17914, billed as the largest locomotive in the world at the time (but not for long) for the Buffalo & Susquehanna as their number 113, but I don't think it was ever delivered. Sold to the Soo Line as their number 600, later renumbered 950, class G. This engine was never owned by the DSS&A.

And it pushed a lot of steam era ore cars in its day.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Strawberry Shipping Vignette in Plant City, Fla. in 1926

Greg Martin
 

Interesting... There is a few off us that gather there on Thursday before we go to Cocoa Beach for lunch and now more so that Stan has passed as he was part of the "Chicken House Crew". Maryland Chicken best little place to gather for lunch and I had no idea the strength of there produce market.
 
Greg Martin
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 7/3/2017 11:05:03 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

I tried to create a vignette of the Strawberry Rush in Plant City, Fla in 1926 with these links. The first is beside the covered shed showing farmers unloading their vehicles with fresh strawberries, perhaps to be loaded into the WFEX reefer spotted there. By this time Western Fruit would have existed for three years after being formed to pooled their cars w/Fruit Growers. People will likely get hungry while working so there is a diner nearby.


http://digitalcollections.hcplc.org/digital/collection/p15391coll1/id/2176/rec/4


Meanwhile under the shed strawberries are being placed into shipping crates.


http://digitalcollections.hcplc.org/digital/collection/p15391co ll1/id/4410/rec/2


Near the shed is the Philadelphia based Kruse's office and strawberry packing plant in Plant City, Fla.


http://digitalcollections.hcplc.org/digital/collection/p15391coll1/id/2188/rec/12


Bill Welch


Re: Equalized Trucks in HO

vapeurchapelon
 

Hello Jim,
 
>> ... further contemplation leads me
to believe that trucks that don't swivel/rock correctly will put pressure on
the wheel to rail contact point ... because even if the car isn't derailing 
it is still attempting to climb the rails rather than following them. <<
 
It's just that. Or more precisely: -friction of the flange against the rail. Additionally friction of the wheel hub against the axle bearing (brass cars have point axles only since a few years...). In the worst case you have plenty of these forces on one side of a wheel set and exactly diagonally opposite the same forces on the other wheel set of the truck - and just the same again on the other truck...
Just because the truck can't align properly to track conditions because of strong bolster springs.
 
Johannes
 
Gesendet: Dienstag, 04. Juli 2017 um 15:31 Uhr
Von: "jimbetz@... [STMFC]"
An: STMFC@...
Betreff: Re: Aw: [STMFC] Re: Equalized Trucks in HO
 

Johannes,

 
  Although you wouldn't immediately think that less pressure on the truck
springs would make a car roll better ... further contemplation leads me
to believe that trucks that don't swivel/rock correctly will put pressure on
the wheel to rail contact point ... because even if the car isn't derailing 
it is still attempting to climb the rails rather than following them.
  I don't have a roll tester so I'm not able to actually test that - but it
makes sense (at least to my pea brain - *G*).
                                                                                                   - Jim B.

 

Re: sweeteners and tank cars

George LaPray
 

Reference to the Pennick & Ford plant in Cedar Rapids brings back a memory from the early 70's.  The P&F plant used an unusual machine to unload boxcars, it was a car rocker, but nothing like the car shakers we associate with unloading open top hoppers.  The boxcar was placed on the rocker platform, the side doors opened and the grain doors cut (if paper) or removed (if wood) after the doorway area drained the rocker would be activated and the platform on which the car rested would start rocking back and forth, it wasn't a huge movement maybe 3 or 4 inches on each end, but the back and forth up and down movement caused the grain in the ends of the cars to move to the center of the car and drain into the unloading pit.  It wasn't real fast taking maybe 15 to 20 minutes to empty the car.  

One day I witnessed a Rock Island stockcar that had been converted to grain service by lining it with plywood being unloaded on this contraption and after a while as the rocking cycle got going the roof of the car was moving in one direction as the floor was going in other directions, parts were dropping off in all directions I actually stepped back about 50 ft as I was concerned the car would disintegrate right before my eyes.  I am sure that was the last revenue move that car ever made.

I think the car rockers were made by Straight Engineering of Iowa who also made car dumpers, the rocker was really a poor mans version of the car dumper as they were a lot cheaper than installing a full car dumper.  They were expensive to maintain for the plants as just as they shook the cars apart they tended to shake themselves apart.  Railroads eventually banned them by refusing to serve any plant that used them  I only ever saw one other one at a soybean processing plant in Indiana an d it had not been used in many years.  

So much for old memories, I want to see the first operating model of one of these contraptions.

George

Steam Loco Serial Numbers

Schleigh Mike
 

Hello Group!  Happy Forth of July!!!

I am need of builder serial numbers of the following steam locomotives which I am sure pulled and pushed freight cars in our era.

Baldwin built 2-10-0-- Soo Line 950, earlier DSS&A 600--On display in Ashland, Wisconsin, built in 1900.

Brooks built 2-8-0--Illinois Terminal No. 27, earlier St. Louis, Troy & Eastern No. 6, built in 1910.

Thanking in advance from Grove City in humid western Penna.

Mike Schleigh

Taurus HOn3 Tank car kit--is the tank useful for std gauge tank cars?

Andy Carlson
 

Hello-
I have a Taurus Products kit #306 for an HOn3 Conoco Tank Car. The tank itself is a single urethane casting with 3 radial courses and a dome with a single elbow safety valve.

My question--anyone familiar enough with this kit, and can you comment on its usefulness in placing this tank on, say a Tichy underframe?  It reminds me of some of the Sunset brass tank cars, though I don't have one to compare it with.
Any thoughts in response is appreciated.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA

Re: Equalized Trucks in HO

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Todd and all, I think it is Precision Scale that offers “wimpy” springs for substitution in locomotive springing, so they can haul more freight cars. I >might< be wrong on the supplier, but they are out there. ISTR that there is an intermediate strength as well.

Schuyler

Hi Jim,

My experience with cutting springs down is consistent with yours. I have done this on brass loco driver suspension springs and truck kingpin screw springs on brass cabooses and other freight cars I have owned over the past 30 years or so. In every case, cutting the spring down or in half results in a 'softer' spring rate, i.e., it is easier to compress the springs. The softer springs almost always deliver improved performance on locos (more traction, fewer derailments because the drivers stay in contact with the rail all the time) and freight cars (fewer or no derailments).

Todd Sullivan.

Re: Equalized Trucks in HO

Todd Sullivan
 

Hi Jim,

My experience with cutting springs down is consistent with yours.  I have done this on brass loco driver suspension springs and truck kingpin screw springs on brass cabooses and other freight cars I have owned over the past 30 years or so.  In every case, cutting the spring down or in half results in a 'softer' spring rate, i.e., it is easier to compress the springs.  The softer springs almost always deliver improved performance on locos (more traction, fewer derailments because the drivers stay in contact with the rail all the time) and freight cars (fewer or no derailments).

Todd Sullivan.

Re: Equalized Trucks in HO

Jim Betz
 

Jon Miller,

  I seem to have a non-working email address for you.  Please
send me a direct email so I can get your new one.  The one I
have is an "inow" addy and may be -very- old.  :-(
                                                                                      - Jim B.