Date   

Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Jim Betz
 

Randy/all,

  We keep hearing guys talk about tungsten ... it doesn't "work" for me.

  Although tungsten does have a higher specific gravity than lead/steel ... it is
not enough more to make a difference in terms of how much weight you can
actually add to your model trains.  We don't use enough volume of weight
to make a difference.
  Tungsten is, for all intents and purposes, impossible to cut/shape/size.  Yes,
it can be cut/machined - but I haven't met anyone in the hobby with the
equipment to do so.  I've never seen "tungsten shot".
  To my way of thinking the only advantage to tungsten is that it isn't
magnetic.  Neither is lead ...

  I use lead shot and sheet lead.  I don't eat it.  I wash my hands with
simple soap and water after I handle it.  I 'encase' it in KK/white glue
so I don't worry about it after it is installed.
                                                                                             - Jim B.


Re: Monon Decals

 

Scott,

See Mont's decals here:

http://www.greatdecals.com/Switzer.htm#301n

Ordering information on the page.

The set you want is #301.  The earliest photo I have of a car with the white stripe scheme has a reweigh date of 6/52, the latest is  12/74; though I would ask Mont the question if that date is on the cusp for you.

Regards,

Mike Aufderheide


Re: Poultry Cars

Jake Schaible
 

Stuart,

While I have yet to locate photos of poultry cars loaded on the Santa Fe in SoCal, I feel it is highly likely... at least in the 1920 & 1930 with Thanksgiving turkeys from Ramona. 

Ramona, CA was once known as the "turkey capital of the world" and I learned they originally had annual "turkey drives" where the town would get together to drive flocks "to the station".   This informal parade & season ending celebration evolved and by 1933 the event was formalized and popular with tourists till the last one in 1941 as WW2 cancelled the event.  At some point, the turkey drives died out, replaced by trucking.  

Live turkey from Ramona were shipped all over the US.  There is a local rumor that President Woodrow Wilson once pardoned a Ramona turkey at the White House, but others think it was Truman and still others think it was neither.  But the real mystery to me is what "station" was the destination of the original Ramona drives, as the town isn't on the track.  My theory is the first drives would have been to Escondido, CA, some 15 miles away, down the San Pasquale Valley.  

I'll make some calls to see if I can confirm...

 

 

 

 


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Donald B. Valentine <riverman_vt@...>
 

Randy,

    Why buy shotgun shells to empty the shot out of for car weights? I suggest that it is much cheaper to find a 
sports shop that sells reloading supplies and simply buy a back of lead shot, or steel if you prefer, The larger
the number the smaller the shot size. I suspect you could find all the shot you could use, either lead or steel 
from #7 /12 to #12 for around $35 for 10 lbs. I have lead shot for reloading purposes but prefer sheet lead for
additional weight on HO scale models. Some building supply firms still offer sheet lead for flashing work if
you need a source. I have all I'll ever need already.

Cordially, Don Valentine.


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Dave Parker
 

It is NOT tungsten.  Please reread last year's conversation as I suggested.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Randy Hammill
 

I wonder if that's tungsten shot. I've been trying to find a source for the smallest size shot in bulk, rather than buying shotgun shells and emptying them. This definitely looks like the stuff.

You can get it at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/DELUXE-MATERIALS-Liquid-Gravity-Weight/dp/B0047YORDQ

Randy
--

Randy Hammill
Modeling the New Haven Railroad 1946-1954  | https//:blog.newbritainstation.com


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

 Unfortunately it’s highly magnetic. It seems it’s ground cast iron or steel. As with all magnetcic materials that’s detrimental to the use of magnetic couplers like Kadee.

The large undertie Kadee magnets will "pull” such a weighted car from a couple inches away causing unwanted uncouplings.

Where the magnetic property is not important it’s a useful product. 

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Oct 29, 2018, at 7:41 AM, gtws00 via Groups.Io <gtws00@...> wrote:

I found a product called Liquid Gravity from Deluxe Materials from the UK the other day in a catalog a friend gave me. Although it is apparently not new has anyone every used it to weight flat cars or gondolas. It appears to be very small pellets of non toxic material that is pour able and fixed in place with CA glue. Looks to be available on Amazon as well
Below is a link to the product and a video on its use.
https://www.deluxematerials.co.uk/en/rc-modelling/83-liquid-gravity-5060243900470.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtfsWZ7LnvU

George Toman <IMG_1534.JPG>


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Dave Parker
 

There was a lengthy discussion of this (overpriced) product in June of last year.  See message 149984 and all that follows it.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: Poultry Cars

Kristin Dummler
 

Stuart,

I haven't seen one specifically, but that doesn't mean they weren't there. A couple of photos show cars in CA (I have one from 1945 in Sacramento, and another in Stockton.) Pacific Wholesale Poultry in Petaluma had two of their own private cars. There was a Dairy, Swine and Poultry Special that ran in 1922 on the Atchison, Topeka, And Santa Fe RR. (Attachment)  It's a good likelihood there were some that made their way south.

While not Santa Fe, others might find interest in the book the Southern Pacific released called "Success with Poultry in California". The digital version can be found here:

https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=uc1.b2751859;view=1up;seq=1


Kristin D.



On 10/29/2018 8:55 AM, Stuart Forsyth via Groups.Io wrote:
Shifting from mesh to operations, has anyone seen photos of poultry cars running on the Santa Fe in Southern California?

Stuart A. Forsyth

On Oct 29, 2018, at 6:34 AM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:

Here is an interior view of the “Brookport”. I’ll contact the person who sent me the photos and see if I can learn reason for the “Brookport” name.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kristin Dummler
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2018 6:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Poultry Cars

 

Doug,

I believe you are correct. The FC Brown car was a very early design that allowed crates of birds to be stacked inside for transport. Note there is no caretaker stateroom. The crates would have been stacked floor to ceiling and, with no one to feed or water the birds, most would have lost weight, and many would have likely perished on the journey.

Excellent pictures of the car in St. Louis. I have not been able to find the car's specific name. Somewhere, I am sure there are records of what it was originally called, but once P.T.C. took over and took over the remaining cars from North American, a lot of them were just left with their original designations, such as the Palace name on the side sill. Somewhere there has to be a listing of the names of the cars. Hopefully it turns up one of these days.

Kristin D.

 

On 10/28/2018 9:46 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Attached are two photos of the car at the National Transportation Museum in St Louis, which I have listed as the Brookport. I don’t know if that name is correct, that is how the photos were named when they came to me. This car has eight layers of cages, the top one does a smaller “screen” on the exterior, no doubt because the fascia covered the upper part of the top cage.

 

Also attached is a very different poultry car, FC Brown #104. Which appears to be a full cage design, built by AFC in 1907. I can’t quite make out the lot #, looks like it could be 9637.

I suspect this car was designed to hold standard chicken crates. As Kristen pointed out in her presentation, farmers had a problem getting their chicken crates back, so cars of this design fell out of favor.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Attachments:

 


<Brookport 1770.JPG>



Re: Poultry Cars

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Sounds like that’s rather the way the Ambroid car was in the first place. It used external strips to represent the edges of the decks between the layers of of chickens. On the actual cars it’s more of an open slot, about 20% the height of the mesh strips. The Ambroid car makes no attempt to represent these slots. On some cars, somewhat vertically centered in the slots are the ends of the deck floorboards that Ambroid does represent. Thus each slot is split into two narrower slots by the deck boards. On other cars these deck boards are hardly visible at all, leaving just a single wider slot. The cars are not all exactly alike.

The Overland brass poultry car does represent these slots.

To my eyes the slots are at least as prominent as the deck boards, though this varies from car to car. Whatever. It’s a complicated side to model, and the mesh is only part of the problem.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Oct 28, 2018, at 11:15 PM, frograbbit602 via Groups.Io <frograbbit602=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:

Dan may I suggest you can make the mesh cover all the coups on one side of the attendants quarters. I have built the coups using styrene for the floors placed in sides ( a bookcase look with top or bottom missing) that goes inside on each side. Once in place you cover the side entire side with the mesh. Now you cut strips or use strip styrene to glue to the interior floors on the outside of the mesh. You now have the look of mesh strips with the floors showing in-between. It makes the build easier using one large piece of mesh rather than strips cut to fit between floors.

Lester Breuer



Re: Monon Decals

T.J. Stratton
 

Scott,

Mont Switzer makes  several great Monon decal sets.  He would also be able to provide you with dates for the various pant schemes.  Sorry, I do not have his e-mail address at hand.

TJ

TJ Stratton Maumee, OH. "Modeling the 1950's branch lines of the New York Central Railroad  in Lenawee County, Michigan" Mailto:michigancentralrr@...


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Scott <repairman87@...>
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2018 9:33 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Monon Decals
 
In Bills presentation of ARA boxcars he had some photos of some Monon cars.   One of the photos of a car had a large billboard "Hoosier Line" going across the top of the car.  It looks it has a reweight of 1954.  First when was this paint scheme used and second does anybody make decals for it?

Thanks
Scott McDonald


Re: Poultry Cars

Stuart Forsyth
 

Shifting from mesh to operations, has anyone seen photos of poultry cars running on the Santa Fe in Southern California?

Stuart A. Forsyth

On Oct 29, 2018, at 6:34 AM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:

Here is an interior view of the “Brookport”. I’ll contact the person who sent me the photos and see if I can learn reason for the “Brookport” name.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kristin Dummler
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2018 6:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Poultry Cars

 

Doug,

I believe you are correct. The FC Brown car was a very early design that allowed crates of birds to be stacked inside for transport. Note there is no caretaker stateroom. The crates would have been stacked floor to ceiling and, with no one to feed or water the birds, most would have lost weight, and many would have likely perished on the journey.

Excellent pictures of the car in St. Louis. I have not been able to find the car's specific name. Somewhere, I am sure there are records of what it was originally called, but once P.T.C. took over and took over the remaining cars from North American, a lot of them were just left with their original designations, such as the Palace name on the side sill. Somewhere there has to be a listing of the names of the cars. Hopefully it turns up one of these days.

Kristin D.

 

On 10/28/2018 9:46 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Attached are two photos of the car at the National Transportation Museum in St Louis, which I have listed as the Brookport. I don’t know if that name is correct, that is how the photos were named when they came to me. This car has eight layers of cages, the top one does a smaller “screen” on the exterior, no doubt because the fascia covered the upper part of the top cage.

 

Also attached is a very different poultry car, FC Brown #104. Which appears to be a full cage design, built by AFC in 1907. I can’t quite make out the lot #, looks like it could be 9637.

I suspect this car was designed to hold standard chicken crates. As Kristen pointed out in her presentation, farmers had a problem getting their chicken crates back, so cars of this design fell out of favor.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Attachments:

 


<Brookport 1770.JPG>


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Jim Betz
 

George/all,

  First - I, for myself, would not put too much of a requirement on "non-toxic".
  Second - I would use white glue (or Krystal Klear) as the adhesive to hold it
                 in place.  Yes, it takes a long time to dry (24 hours or more some
                 times) ... so what?  It is a lot cheaper and it holds irregular shapes
                 much better than -any- form of CA.
  Third - I have a "life time supply" of bird shot (lead) that I am using and it
             works quite well.  So this product should work fine.

  I would want to weigh identical -volume- quantities of both to see if the
difference in the amount of weight is important.  At least one huge 
advantage of this method ("shot" no matter what material) is that it allows
you to "tuck the weight into lots of very small places very easily".  My
experience is that I can also use small rectangles of sheet lead to do
pretty much the same thing - without sacrificing any meaningful
amount of weight for the completed car.  When using sheet lead I
still use KK/white glue to hold it in place.
  If you thin out some white glue it will flow into the smaller spaces
easily.  The trick is to not get it so thin that it truly "flows" ... think
slow ooze and you have the idea.  I even thin out KK - some times -
if it isn't getting down in and around where I need it to get.
  At least one distinct advantage to using KK/white glue is that
it will form a coating that goes up and over the top of the
weight - which drastically decreases the chance of any of
the weight falling out.  I apply it so that some of it is on
top of the weight and the rest flows into the cracks/spaces
around the weight.  When applying to the bottom of a car
I make sure all of the weight has a clear coating of the glue -
and it doesn't ever fall out.
                                                                       - Jim B.


Re: Poultry Cars

Douglas Harding
 

Here is an interior view of the “Brookport”. I’ll contact the person who sent me the photos and see if I can learn reason for the “Brookport” name.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Kristin Dummler
Sent: Monday, October 29, 2018 6:37 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Poultry Cars

 

Doug,

I believe you are correct. The FC Brown car was a very early design that allowed crates of birds to be stacked inside for transport. Note there is no caretaker stateroom. The crates would have been stacked floor to ceiling and, with no one to feed or water the birds, most would have lost weight, and many would have likely perished on the journey.

Excellent pictures of the car in St. Louis. I have not been able to find the car's specific name. Somewhere, I am sure there are records of what it was originally called, but once P.T.C. took over and took over the remaining cars from North American, a lot of them were just left with their original designations, such as the Palace name on the side sill. Somewhere there has to be a listing of the names of the cars. Hopefully it turns up one of these days.

Kristin D.

 

On 10/28/2018 9:46 PM, Douglas Harding wrote:

Attached are two photos of the car at the National Transportation Museum in St Louis, which I have listed as the Brookport. I don’t know if that name is correct, that is how the photos were named when they came to me. This car has eight layers of cages, the top one does a smaller “screen” on the exterior, no doubt because the fascia covered the upper part of the top cage.

 

Also attached is a very different poultry car, FC Brown #104. Which appears to be a full cage design, built by AFC in 1907. I can’t quite make out the lot #, looks like it could be 9637.

I suspect this car was designed to hold standard chicken crates. As Kristen pointed out in her presentation, farmers had a problem getting their chicken crates back, so cars of this design fell out of favor.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

Attachments:

 


SP boxcar detail question

Pierre Oliver
 

Recently I saw a photo that shows a SP B-50-20. The end ladder is clearly narrower than the side ladder.

The question is, did all the SP '37 AAR boxcars get built that way, or was it just that particular build loy?

Thanks

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


Monon Decals

Scott
 

In Bills presentation of ARA boxcars he had some photos of some Monon cars.   One of the photos of a car had a large billboard "Hoosier Line" going across the top of the car.  It looks it has a reweight of 1954.  First when was this paint scheme used and second does anybody make decals for it?

Thanks
Scott McDonald


Re: Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

Bruce Smith
 

George,

It is much cheaper to buy S-280 steel shot media, which is what I think that this stuff is. I got 10 lbs for about $30. For another $1 I got a plastic dispenser bottle… just make sure to make the opening big enough. I glue it in place with ACC.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Oct 29, 2018, at 6:41 AM, gtws00 via Groups.Io <gtws00@...> wrote:

I found a product called Liquid Gravity from Deluxe Materials from the UK the other day in a catalog a friend gave me. Although it is apparently not new has anyone every used it to weight flat cars or gondolas. It appears to be very small pellets of non toxic material that is pour able and fixed in place with CA glue. Looks to be available on Amazon as well
Below is a link to the product and a video on its use.
https://www.deluxematerials.co.uk/en/rc-modelling/83-liquid-gravity-5060243900470.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtfsWZ7LnvU

George Toman <IMG_1534.JPG>


Re: Poultry Cars

Kristin Dummler
 

Lester,

Very nice little reefer/combo Ambroid build! I wish the Ambroid kits had been a little closer to prototype. They are fun to build and actually a pretty good starting point. Here's the picture I have of the "Speedy".


Kristin D


On 10/29/2018 7:58 AM, Lester Breuer wrote:
Kristin I wish I did; however, I do not have the last  car or pictures.  I build it for a friend who has it freight car collection.  The only car I currently have on the railroad is a wood Ambroid kit without the floors.  I thought about taking it apart to put in floors but decided against it.  I hope to build another with floors this winter.
Lester Breuer

Attachments:



Re: Poultry Cars

Lester Breuer
 

Kristin I wish I did; however, I do not have the last  car or pictures.  I build it for a friend who has it freight car collection.  The only car I currently have on the railroad is a wood Ambroid kit without the floors.  I thought about taking it apart to put in floors but decided against it.  I hope to build another with floors this winter.
Lester Breuer


Weighing Freight Car Models with Liquid Gravity

gtws00
 

I found a product called Liquid Gravity from Deluxe Materials from the UK the other day in a catalog a friend gave me. Although it is apparently not new has anyone every used it to weight flat cars or gondolas. It appears to be very small pellets of non toxic material that is pour able and fixed in place with CA glue. Looks to be available on Amazon as well
Below is a link to the product and a video on its use.
https://www.deluxematerials.co.uk/en/rc-modelling/83-liquid-gravity-5060243900470.html
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtfsWZ7LnvU

George Toman

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