Date   

BULLDOZER FOOTNOTE

WILLIAM PARDIE
 


I have not yet completed one of the Evergreem bulldozers.  An area that was not too clear (to me) in the instructions was the placement of the pedals and operating levers.  I came across on in a museum a few years ago and got some photos which solved this mystery.  Will share if anyone needs help.

Bill Pardie


Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone


Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

Well, now that I know that Evergreen has risen from the dead I have ordered another bulldozer

Thanks Peter:

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Peter Ness <prness@...>
Date: 9/14/18 8:05 AM (GMT-10:00)
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Bill,

 

I think Evergreen Hill Designs would be saddened to learn they are long gone.  I don’t have the heart to tell them myself! :D

https://evergreenhilldesigns.com/shop?olsPage=t%2Fho-scale-models&page=2

 

Regards,

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of WILLIAM PARDIE
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2018 11:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

 

One model that has not been mentioned  is a very good Carerpillar RD-8 from a company called Evergreen Hill Designs.  This is a white metal kit.  The company is long gone (as are so many) but they come up on E-bay.  Good thing I bought two as the wheel/track casting was defective on one (Sound familiar?).  There is not a blade on this model so it fits great on a flat car

 

Bill Pardie

 

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Bill Welch <fgexbill@...>

Date: 9/13/18 4:15 PM (GMT-10:00)

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

 

Thank you everyone for your responses. I have to admit with so many things to build the fact that the Artitech D7 is ready to put on a flat car deck is very appealing.

Bill Welch


Re: GN box car (was Re: Flat Car Load Securement)

Bill Welch
 

My model of this is a Semi-kit (just major casting, no decals) sold to me by Andy Carlson 20+ years ago. Here is a link to a photo: http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/modeling/models/welch/gn31296main.html

AFAIK the only 40-foot Pratt Trussed car w/Z-bar bracing.

Bill Welch


Re: other loads was D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 9/14/2018 1:10 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:
I do agree that the LeTourneau scraper shown would be an excellent item for some manufacturer to model (they are available in 1/48 scale).

    Time for a 3D person to do some work and send to Shapeways!:-D

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, 
SPROG, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


GN box car (was Re: Flat Car Load Securement)

Tim O'Connor
 


This is Gene Deimling's P:48 Chooch model of these GN 31000-31499 cars.

Thanks, Jack, for sharing those remarkable photos!

Tim O'


Hi Bill,

Not yet. It's been making its way up the pile though. When it happens, it'll appear on the blog (which was updated today with another of the fine groups of images from Jack Burgess - blog link below).

Cheers,
Ted Culotta


  Blog: http://prototopics.blogspot.com

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Bill Welch
 

Two Things:

I am really glad I ask my question because I have learned a lot and maybe someone (no pressure) will be motivated to develop a presentation on "Steam Era Construction Equipment as Flat Car Loads" for one of the now several RPM events.

While writing this I remembered a post on the Speedwitch Blog about another type of construction equipment: http://prototopics.blogspot.com/search/label/Euclid

Thanks for all of the informative posts on this topic.

Bill Welch


Re: other loads was D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Douglas Harding
 

Here are some AAR diagrams and instructions for loading/securing crawler tractors, from 1944 and 1952. As has been stated it is all blocking, very little tie downs.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Daniel A. Mitchell
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 3:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] other loads was D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

 

Nice photos!

 

The dozers shown are D7 types with LeTourneau blades. They had an odd (for Caterpillar) rounded hood that tapered and curved towards the back. No other Cat had such a hood. They are about the same size as a D8, but were lighter and less powerful. Both were used extensively in WWII.

 

I do agree that the LeTourneau scraper shown would be an excellent item for some manufacturer to model (they are available in 1/48 scale). These seem to have been the most successful of many scraper types of the period. They are mechanically complicated and a challenge to model well. All “actions” were activated by cables driven by winches on the tractor. They came in several sizes. The basic scraper “bowl” could be pulled by either a crawler tractor or an integral 2-wheeled tractor (the “Super-C Tournapull”).

 

Dan Mitchell

==========

On Sep 14, 2018, at 2:32 PM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

 

Bill, Dennis, Dan, Folks,

 

Lots of interesting photos out there. I agree with Dennis that there usually isn’t a lot of cable/chain for example for WWII era loads, but there usually is some. With respect to dozers, here is a photo from the Farmall factory of artillery tractors  and cranes loaded on last (note that to the right, they are in motion being loaded!)

 

Another attached photo (Delano, I think) circa 1944 show new dozers with attached blade assemblies.  Cat D6 or D7 I’m guessing?

 

What I would love to see is a LeTourneau towed scraper model in HO. Similar to the one in the attached photo from the Signal Corps Archive.

 

Regards

Bruce

 

Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

 

 



On Sep 14, 2018, at 12:49 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

 

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 09:51 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:

Does anyone have any photos or diagrams of the blockage and cable restraints for a bll dozer load?

My goole-fu is lacking today, but there are some interesting images HERE

From spending all lunch browsing the web, all I can say is don't confuse modern practice with what was required in our era. Photos of modern loads show little or no blocking, but lots of cable tie downs. Steam era practice was lots of custom fitted blocking and few if any tie downs. I recall the dozer that fell off the flatcar in Downers Grove, causing a spectacular wreck on the Q three track mainline, fell because someone forgot to nail the blocking in place. Nothing was said in the ICC report about tie downs.

Dennis Storzek

<WW2 flatcar loads - Farmall.jpg><bulldozers on flat.jpg><LeTourneau.jpg>

 


Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 12:20 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell wrote:
It should be noted that early tractors were not so often used as bulldozers. They mostly pulled graders, elevating graders, scrapers, rollers, rippers, and wagons. The utility of the dozer blade was not so obvious at first. As the front mounted blade became the norm for much earthmoving, the tractors were modified to match and the front mounted winches became common.
I agree, the blade was of little utility for moving earth; after the bulldozer knocked down the trees, it was time to bring in the scrapers. After the general adoption of hydraulics, the excavator bucket changed all that.
 
 
Nowadays one rarely sees a “naked” crawler tractor … they are still occasionally used to pull scrapers as they have more “pull” than a wheeled tractor, but they’re too slow for most current practice. Today crawlers are mostly seen as bulldozers, rippers, and scraper-pushers. Lately there are a bunch of big 4-crawler "rubber-band” tracked machines making inroads since they are midway in performance (“pull” vs. speed) between metal-tracked machines and weeled tractors.
 
 
But the blade was still useful for the machines that PUSH the scraper, so as time went on, bladeless machines became less and less common, at least in my experience.

Dennis Storzek
 
 


Re: Flat Car Load Securement

Ted Culotta
 

Hi Bill,

Not yet. It's been making its way up the pile though. When it happens, it'll appear on the blog (which was updated today with another of the fine groups of images from Jack Burgess - blog link below).

Cheers,
Ted

Ted Culotta
Speedwitch Media
P.O. Box 392, Guilford, CT 06437


Re: three character shots of a NYC gon

Dave Parker
 

Tim:

I don't doubt it.  I'm afraid I know very little about foundry stamps.

I'm guessing that maybe ASF subcontracted the foundry work to S-G here?  After all, there were other parts that comprised the truck as a whole.

BTW, at the time this truck was built (probably mid-teens), I think Symington and Gould (Coupler) were still separate companies.  Or, that's what what my 1916 CBC suggests.  The history of these two outfits is a bit murky to me.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA


Re: other loads was D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Nice photos!

The dozers shown are D7 types with LeTourneau blades. They had an odd (for Caterpillar) rounded hood that tapered and curved towards the back. No other Cat had such a hood. They are about the same size as a D8, but were lighter and less powerful. Both were used extensively in WWII.

I do agree that the LeTourneau scraper shown would be an excellent item for some manufacturer to model (they are available in 1/48 scale). These seem to have been the most successful of many scraper types of the period. They are mechanically complicated and a challenge to model well. All “actions” were activated by cables driven by winches on the tractor. They came in several sizes. The basic scraper “bowl” could be pulled by either a crawler tractor or an integral 2-wheeled tractor (the “Super-C Tournapull”).

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Sep 14, 2018, at 2:32 PM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Bill, Dennis, Dan, Folks,

Lots of interesting photos out there. I agree with Dennis that there usually isn’t a lot of cable/chain for example for WWII era loads, but there usually is some. With respect to dozers, here is a photo from the Farmall factory of artillery tractors  and cranes loaded on last (note that to the right, they are in motion being loaded!)

Another attached photo (Delano, I think) circa 1944 show new dozers with attached blade assemblies.  Cat D6 or D7 I’m guessing?

What I would love to see is a LeTourneau towed scraper model in HO. Similar to the one in the attached photo from the Signal Corps Archive.

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Sep 14, 2018, at 12:49 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 09:51 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
Does anyone have any photos or diagrams of the blockage and cable restraints for a bll dozer load?
My goole-fu is lacking today, but there are some interesting images HERE

From spending all lunch browsing the web, all I can say is don't confuse modern practice with what was required in our era. Photos of modern loads show little or no blocking, but lots of cable tie downs. Steam era practice was lots of custom fitted blocking and few if any tie downs. I recall the dozer that fell off the flatcar in Downers Grove, causing a spectacular wreck on the Q three track mainline, fell because someone forgot to nail the blocking in place. Nothing was said in the ICC report about tie downs.

Dennis Storzek
<WW2 flatcar loads - Farmall.jpg><bulldozers on flat.jpg><LeTourneau.jpg>


Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Future Fantasy!

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Sep 14, 2018, at 3:46 PM, Bruce Smith <smithbf@...> wrote:

Dan, 

Don’t you mean “some time, at least 10 years in the future, they will start to be painted a more subdued….” After all, this list ends at 1960 ;)

As for me, I paint nearly every load I load a nice olive drab. That includes Caterpillars. Gotta love modeling 1944!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Sep 14, 2018, at 2:38 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

Early Best tractors were painted gray.  Holt tractors were mostly gray or brown.  After Holt and Best merged to form Caterpillar, their early tractors remained gray.

In the 1930’s they turned yellow. This was a BRIGHT yellow called “Caterpillar Yellow” or “Highway Yellow” …  it was essentially "chrome” yellow. After sometime in the late 1970’s they were, and remain, painted a more subdued “Mustard Yellow” color with a brown tint. UP Armor Yellow is a not bad substitute for the later color, maybe with a touch of brown added.

International tractors (IHC) were painted bright red, and later, yellow. Euclid tractors were an odd Chartruse green. Allis-Chalmers were bright orange.

HOWEVER, most of these tractors could/would be painted in whatever color the buyer wanted, so exceptions can be found.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Sep 14, 2018, at 1:00 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-Probably not much help today but the paint mix suggested be Evergreen Hill was 8 drops of Floquil refer yellow and two drops of Floquil roof brown.  Some of us still have a stash

Bill Pardie
<snip>


Re: three character shots of a NYC gon

Tim O'Connor
 

Dave

I'm certain that "S" inside a hexagon is a foundry stamp. From your information I
conclude that ASF holds the patent.

From my limited info, Symington-Gould is the only foundry I could find that uses an
"S" inside a hexagon.

Tim

I'm not sure about the Symington-Gould foundry stamp, but it is ASF (American Steel Foundries) that is stamped on the upper left truss-member. In the center is stamped Vulcan, which was an ASF trade-name. There is a patent date of 10-6-96 on the left diagonal. This date routinely appears on ASF Andrews and Vulcan trucks of the teens and twenties, and reflects the original patent awarded to one J S Hardie, the rights to which were later acquired by ASF. The sideframe in Hardie's patent bore only a passing resemblance to an Andrews or a Vulcan; it was the removable journal box bolted into the pedestal jaw that was patented.

BTW, based on the CBCs, the "Andrews" and "Vulcan" trade names seem to have come into play in about 1909 and 1916 respectively.

Also note that, on this truck, the top chord appears to be a U-channel, while the rest of the truss is T-shaped. I assume this was a short-lived transition on the way to the full U-channel version. I don't think this "mixed truss" arrangement was in any way common, but I have seen a couple of other examples. There is a Gould-manufactured "Vulcan" sideframe advertised in the 1909 CBC that clearly has both U- and L-section elements.

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*


Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

John Hagen <sprinthag@...>
 

I agree Peter.

It’s a dirty job but somebodies gotta do it.

Better you than me.

John Hagen

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Peter Ness
Sent: Friday, September 14, 2018 1:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

 

Bill,

 

I think Evergreen Hill Designs would be saddened to learn they are long gone.  I don’t have the heart to tell them myself! :D

https://evergreenhilldesigns.com/shop?olsPage=t%2Fho-scale-models&page=2

 

Regards,

Peter Ness

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of WILLIAM PARDIE
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2018 11:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

 

One model that has not been mentioned  is a very good Carerpillar RD-8 from a company called Evergreen Hill Designs.  This is a white metal kit.  The company is long gone (as are so many) but they come up on E-bay.  Good thing I bought two as the wheel/track casting was defective on one (Sound familiar?).  There is not a blade on this model so it fits great on a flat car

 

Bill Pardie

 

 

 

 

Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

 

-------- Original message --------

From: Bill Welch <fgexbill@...>

Date: 9/13/18 4:15 PM (GMT-10:00)

Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

 

Thank you everyone for your responses. I have to admit with so many things to build the fact that the Artitech D7 is ready to put on a flat car deck is very appealing.

Bill Welch


Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Bruce Smith
 

Dan, 

Don’t you mean “some time, at least 10 years in the future, they will start to be painted a more subdued….” After all, this list ends at 1960 ;)

As for me, I paint nearly every load I load a nice olive drab. That includes Caterpillars. Gotta love modeling 1944!

Regards
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL

On Sep 14, 2018, at 2:38 PM, Daniel A. Mitchell <danmitch@...> wrote:

Early Best tractors were painted gray.  Holt tractors were mostly gray or brown.  After Holt and Best merged to form Caterpillar, their early tractors remained gray.

In the 1930’s they turned yellow. This was a BRIGHT yellow called “Caterpillar Yellow” or “Highway Yellow” …  it was essentially "chrome” yellow. After sometime in the late 1970’s they were, and remain, painted a more subdued “Mustard Yellow” color with a brown tint. UP Armor Yellow is a not bad substitute for the later color, maybe with a touch of brown added.

International tractors (IHC) were painted bright red, and later, yellow. Euclid tractors were an odd Chartruse green. Allis-Chalmers were bright orange.

HOWEVER, most of these tractors could/would be painted in whatever color the buyer wanted, so exceptions can be found.

Dan Mitchell
==========
On Sep 14, 2018, at 1:00 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-Probably not much help today but the paint mix suggested be Evergreen Hill was 8 drops of Floquil refer yellow and two drops of Floquil roof brown.  Some of us still have a stash

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Date: 9/14/18 6:26 AM (GMT-10:00)
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Some early images HERE

One thing not mentioned, is other than military equipment, very little construction machinery moved by rail other than brand new, which means that what you load on your cars is very era dependent. While models of those thirties era machines make neat scenery, there is very little justification to have them as flatcar loads on a fifties era layout.

Any thoughts if any dozers were equipped with the after market blades at the Cat factory? My gut feeling is the tractors came naked, and after market accessories like blades and rippers were added by the purchaser.

Just an aside, I have memories of when the Chicago expressways were excavated during the fifties, and recall cable rigged dozer blades with the block mounted on the top of the nose over the radiator, but never saw one with a full overhead frame.

Dennis Storzek



Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

So apparentlythis is NOT the one now offered by Rio Grands Models.

The photo on the EH webside does show the undersized tracks that haunted the earlier Canon models kit ... I think they are the same. It’s odd that they did such a good job on the engine and chassis of the tractor, but goofed-up badly on the tracks.

However, the GHQ tractor is a great, and far better, model of this same prototype.

Dan Mitchell
==========


On Sep 14, 2018, at 2:05 PM, Peter Ness <prness@...> wrote:

Bill,
 
I think Evergreen Hill Designs would be saddened to learn they are long gone.  I don’t have the heart to tell them myself! :D
 
Regards,
Peter Ness
 
From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of WILLIAM PARDIE
Sent: Thursday, September 13, 2018 11:10 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load
 
One model that has not been mentioned  is a very good Carerpillar RD-8 from a company called Evergreen Hill Designs.  This is a white metal kit.  The company is long gone (as are so many) but they come up on E-bay.  Good thing I bought two as the wheel/track casting was defective on one (Sound familiar?).  There is not a blade on this model so it fits great on a flat car
 
Bill Pardie
 
 
 
 
Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
 
-------- Original message --------
From: Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> 
Date: 9/13/18 4:15 PM (GMT-10:00) 
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load 
 
Thank you everyone for your responses. I have to admit with so many things to build the fact that the Artitech D7 is ready to put on a flat car deck is very appealing.

Bill Welch 



Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Early Best tractors were painted gray.  Holt tractors were mostly gray or brown.  After Holt and Best merged to form Caterpillar, their early tractors remained gray.

In the 1930’s they turned yellow. This was a BRIGHT yellow called “Caterpillar Yellow” or “Highway Yellow” …  it was essentially "chrome” yellow. After sometime in the late 1970’s they were, and remain, painted a more subdued “Mustard Yellow” color with a brown tint. UP Armor Yellow is a not bad substitute for the later color, maybe with a touch of brown added.

International tractors (IHC) were painted bright red, and later, yellow. Euclid tractors were an odd Chartruse green. Allis-Chalmers were bright orange.

HOWEVER, most of these tractors could/would be painted in whatever color the buyer wanted, so exceptions can be found.

Dan Mitchell
==========

On Sep 14, 2018, at 1:00 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:





Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-Probably not much help today but the paint mix suggested be Evergreen Hill was 8 drops of Floquil refer yellow and two drops of Floquil roof brown.  Some of us still have a stash

Bill Pardie



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...>
Date: 9/14/18 6:26 AM (GMT-10:00)
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Some early images HERE

One thing not mentioned, is other than military equipment, very little construction machinery moved by rail other than brand new, which means that what you load on your cars is very era dependent. While models of those thirties era machines make neat scenery, there is very little justification to have them as flatcar loads on a fifties era layout.

Any thoughts if any dozers were equipped with the after market blades at the Cat factory? My gut feeling is the tractors came naked, and after market accessories like blades and rippers were added by the purchaser.

Just an aside, I have memories of when the Chicago expressways were excavated during the fifties, and recall cable rigged dozer blades with the block mounted on the top of the nose over the radiator, but never saw one with a full overhead frame.

Dennis Storzek


Re: D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

comments imbedded ...
On Sep 14, 2018, at 12:26 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

Some early images HERE

One thing not mentioned, is other than military equipment, very little construction machinery moved by rail other than brand new, which means that what you load on your cars is very era dependent. While models of those thirties era machines make neat scenery, there is very little justification to have them as flatcar loads on a fifties era layout.

Largely true, with exceptions … like logging railroads which moved a lot of equipment around by rail over their own systems. The early tractors were usually purchased with only basic equipment, usually including winches.

Blades, scrapers, rollers, etc. were then purchased from any of a number of after-market suppliers. This lead to a LOT of variety, and some real "Rube-Goldberg" monstrosities.

Any thoughts if any dozers were equipped with the after market blades at the Cat factory? My gut feeling is the tractors came naked, and after market accessories like blades and rippers were added by the purchaser.

Usually the case until after WWII.

Just an aside, I have memories of when the Chicago expressways were excavated during the fifties, and recall cable rigged dozer blades with the block mounted on the top of the nose over the radiator, but never saw one with a full overhead frame.

I recall seeing LeTourneu overhead-rigged cable blades on Cat tractors with rear winches in the 1950’s. By then front mounted winches were the preferred system. Such had the winch mounted on the front below the radiator (chin), with the cable running up to a set of sheaves mounted above the radiator (forehead), then down to the blade. This was a much simpler and more compact arrangement, but largely limited to just worknig a front blade. In a few more years the hydraulic accessories would take over the market.

It should be noted that early tractors were not so often used as bulldozers. They mostly pulled graders, elevating graders, scrapers, rollers, rippers, and wagons. The utility of the dozer blade was not so obvious at first. As the front mounted blade became the norm for much earthmoving, the tractors were modified to match and the front mounted winches became common.

If you’re interested in such machines, investigate the Historic Construction Equipment Association (HCEA). They have national and regional meets around the country, and a website < http://www.hcea.net >. Their meets are lots of fun … giant “sandbox" for a weekend, with all sorts of old machinery rooting, digging, pushing, plowing, and hauling earth, accompanied by matching sights, sounds, and smells. Tremendous action everywhere, but with almost nothing being accomplished!

Nowadays one rarely sees a “naked” crawler tractor … they are still occasionally used to pull scrapers as they have more “pull” than a wheeled tractor, but they’re too slow for most current practice. Today crawlers are mostly seen as bulldozers, rippers, and scraper-pushers. Lately there are a bunch of big 4-crawler "rubber-band” tracked machines making inroads since they are midway in performance (“pull” vs. speed) between metal-tracked machines and weeled tractors.

Dan Mitchell
==========

Dennis Storzek


other loads was D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Bruce Smith
 

Bill, Dennis, Dan, Folks,

Lots of interesting photos out there. I agree with Dennis that there usually isn’t a lot of cable/chain for example for WWII era loads, but there usually is some. With respect to dozers, here is a photo from the Farmall factory of artillery tractors  and cranes loaded on last (note that to the right, they are in motion being loaded!)

Another attached photo (Delano, I think) circa 1944 show new dozers with attached blade assemblies.  Cat D6 or D7 I’m guessing?

What I would love to see is a LeTourneau towed scraper model in HO. Similar to the one in the attached photo from the Signal Corps Archive.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Sep 14, 2018, at 12:49 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 09:51 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
Does anyone have any photos or diagrams of the blockage and cable restraints for a bll dozer load?
My goole-fu is lacking today, but there are some interesting images HERE

From spending all lunch browsing the web, all I can say is don't confuse modern practice with what was required in our era. Photos of modern loads show little or no blocking, but lots of cable tie downs. Steam era practice was lots of custom fitted blocking and few if any tie downs. I recall the dozer that fell off the flatcar in Downers Grove, causing a spectacular wreck on the Q three track mainline, fell because someone forgot to nail the blocking in place. Nothing was said in the ICC report about tie downs.

Dennis Storzek


Re: other loads was D8 Bulldozer as a Flat Car Load

Bruce Smith
 

Dennis,

Nice page.  I have done the Jeep 16 pack load and the M31 ARV loads already from that page ;)

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Sep 14, 2018, at 12:49 PM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

On Fri, Sep 14, 2018 at 09:51 AM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:
Does anyone have any photos or diagrams of the blockage and cable restraints for a bll dozer load?
My goole-fu is lacking today, but there are some interesting images HERE

From spending all lunch browsing the web, all I can say is don't confuse modern practice with what was required in our era. Photos of modern loads show little or no blocking, but lots of cable tie downs. Steam era practice was lots of custom fitted blocking and few if any tie downs. I recall the dozer that fell off the flatcar in Downers Grove, causing a spectacular wreck on the Q three track mainline, fell because someone forgot to nail the blocking in place. Nothing was said in the ICC report about tie downs.

Dennis Storzek

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