Date   
Re: Photo: Chalk Marks On Boxcar

Norm Buckhart
 

Guy - are these cans in the photo Keely Cans? that you are referring to?  Norm Buckhart

On Dec 1, 2019, at 1:02 PM, Guy Wilber via Groups.Io <guycwilber@...> wrote:

Richard Townsend asked:

“As long as we're wondering, I wonder what the little hooks under the left-most two side panels are for.”

Those hooks were used to hold “Keely Cans” used to cool journal boxes.  They held water which dripped onto the boxes.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

Photo: Bad Stencil Job

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Bad Stencil Job

This is link to a photo from in the collection of the University of Utah:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s64q9921

Notice the tilted placement of the reweigh stencil. This could be my cover should I again botch a reweigh decal job...always a possibility.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Plant identity

Allen Montgomery
 

According to my plant identification app on my phone, it is commonly called Curled Dock (Rumex crispus).
I try to ID all the plants in my modeling area too.

Allen Montgomery



On Monday, December 2, 2019, 1:34:14 AM MST, Paul Woods <paul@...> wrote:


I concur; I have enough of it around my house to recognise it pretty quick.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ
NYCSHS #7172

Re: Photo: D&RGW Gondola With Load Of Mine Cars

Bob Webber
 

No.  The D&RG was merged with the RGW a lot earlier - the "W" is an artifact of the D&RG's reorganization from bankruptcy,  forced by the Gould forces in the MP (which controlled the D&RG) to build the D&RG's Pacific Extension, making the D&RG build, equip and pay for what became the WP  (as it was forced out during the reorganization).  This occurred in the early 20s with lettering updated right about 1923 - when this took place.  IOW, when this photo was taken.  (The earleir variant of the D&RGW is a whole 'nother story).

1923 is the year the sparrows came back - all passenger cars purchased to modernize & equip the WP were brought back to the D&RG, WP had to purchase new cars.  The same thing happened to an extent with freight, though WP kept a lot. 

The MP & D&RG(W) & WP equipment of the era show marked similarity as well.  In fact, on the AC&F Flickr site, you can find the new Walthers MBE painted in D&RG, but the Lot is clearly named & purchased by the MP.  (Ironically, several WP MBEs would be leased to the D&RGW a few decades later to  supplant these).

This is also one of the reason that, had Harriman stayed alive a wee bit longer, there is more of a possibility of the SP entering Colorado near the 4 Corners region.  There exists to this day, huge deposits of good coal that was never really exploited due to transportation issues in the area.  That's the reason the Farmington branch was built from/to Durango as a Standard Gauge railroad. 

At 05:45 PM 12/1/2019, Bill Daniels via Groups.Io wrote:
You might notice that the “W� on the road name was added later. The D&RG absorbed the RGW shortly before and became the D&RGW. On the end reporting mark, the “W� is much whiter than the rest of the reporting mark.

Bill Daniels
Santa Rosa, California

Bob Webber

Re: Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Thanks for the correction, Bruce.

Bill Daniels
Santa Rosa, California


On Dec 1, 2019, at 4:50 PM, Bill Daniels via Groups.Io <billinsf@...> wrote:

Steve, that was the typical arrangement on the Ban Dyke tankcars. Some still exist on the Cumbes & Toltec, albeit narrow gauged.

Bill Daniels
Santa Rosa California 


On Dec 1, 2019, at 4:39 PM, Steve Wolcott <swolcott@...> wrote:

Interesting brakewheel arrangement on that tank car.  Haven't seen that before.  
Steve Wolcott

Re: Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery

al_brown03
 

Interesting car: looks like one of the *big* Class X (10,000 gallons).

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

Re: Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Dec 1, 2019 at 06:17 PM, Thomas Evans wrote:
Notice that the lettering is completely invisible - no doubt obliterated by dirt & grime - Tom
A sure indication that the photo was taken with orthchromatic film, which renders yellows (UTLX cars had yellow lettering) as a dark gray.

Dennis Storzek

Re: Photo: Trainload of Maytag Washers

Douglas Harding
 

Maytag washers were made in Newton IA. The plant was served by the Rock Island. This train would most likely have been routed Rock Island to the UP at Omaha, or possibly Colorado Springs.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, December 2, 2019 1:23 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Trainload of Maytag Washers

 

Photo: Trainload of Maytag Washers

This is link to a 1935 publicity photo from the collection of the University of Utah:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6tj0x2j

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

NPDX 60235, DL&W 66205 and CB&QQ 133135 circa 1924

Brian Rochon
 

Rivetology & Improving an Older Model of C&G #3703

Bill Welch
 

Awhile back I posted photos of Columbus & Greenville #3703, a model of a rebuilt steel boxcar I kitbashed over two decades ago. Photos can be very revealing and as I looked at the photos I could see how far I have come in terms of recognizing details and that I have developed some pretty good modeling skills. Further there are products now available that can help me (and all of us) build better models. With that in mind I decided to see what I could do to improve this model.

Back in the day the only thing I could think of to serve for the many rivets of various sizes along the sill were the Detail Associates Nut/Bolt/Washer parts. I knew they were much too big but could not think of anything else. Now I knew how to more accurately represent the various sizes needed on the model’s Sill and to hold the ladders in place.

First however look at the two photos comparing three different rivets. From L to R are an Athearn Boxcar rivet, Athearn Gondola Rivet, and a Tichy .20 Rivet, their smallest. The Boxcar rivet is the one I harvest most of the time. For C&G 3703 I only used these on the sill step mounting straps. I decided the other rivets should be a little larger as they would encounter more stress given their position so I harvested rivets from the Athearn gondola. For the ladders attachment brackets I used the small Tichy rivets to model the bolt heads. I was able to remove the Detail Associates NBW heads pretty easily and managed to salvage many of them to be recycled on other models.

One of the things I do to help me see the top curved side of the Athearn rivets is to run a Silver Sharpie over them before I harvest them. Some of this silver can be seen in the photos.

As I proceeded I realized thanks to Archer rivet decals, I could now place a line rivets on the two side sheets to the right of the door where the original door track was. The ones I used are very close to the size and spacing already on the car. I paused for a minute after applying and said to myself: “This looks really good.” Then I decided to try to play a visual trick and applied lengths of Archer’s smallest Aircraft Panel Line decals to delineate the missing bottom edges of the side sheets. It will be interesting to see what this area looks like when it gets painted.

I am pretty sure I painted this model with Accuflex Burlington Great Northern Green so I will use the same color from Badger’s Modelflex line of paints.

Bill Welch

Re: Photo: Trainload of Maytag Washers

 

Very cool.  I wonder how much production that represents from the factory, a week?

Mike Aufderheide

Re: Plant identity

Paul Woods
 

I concur; I have enough of it around my house to recognise it pretty quick.

Regards
Paul Woods

Whangarei, NZ
NYCSHS #7172

Re: Photo: Chalk Marks On Boxcar

Bob Chaparro
 

Keeley Cans & Hoses

This message was posted by "MontourMan" on Train Orders.com on 09/26/16. It was in response to a question about hoses over the truck bearings on a UP locomotive tender.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

++++

Keeley was a name that railroaders picked up to use referring to the treatment of hotboxes. See the attached Wikipedia link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keeley_Institute

We have several portable "Keeley Cans" that the Burlington made, that have light chains to secure it to the freight car body.

Attached to it was a long rubber hose with a regulating valve to control water flow to the hot bearing.

This was to allow the car to be moved to the nearest set off point for proper repair.

These cans are marked "Burlington" and I have never seen anything like it from any other railroad.

Photo: Trainload of Maytag Washers

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Trainload of Maytag Washers

This is link to a 1935 publicity photo from the collection of the University of Utah:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6tj0x2j

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Photos: Railroad Yard At Ogden, Utah

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PFE Reefer With Load Of Pecan Pieces

Bob Chaparro
 

PFE Reefer With Load Of Pecan Pieces

This is link to a 1927 photo from the collection of the University of Utah:

https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6jq397q

The stenciling on the barrels appears to say they contain pecan pieces. The captions says the load is pecans.

In any case, this is another example of a non-perishable load shipped in a refrigerator car.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet

Re: Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery

Thomas Evans
 

Notice that the lettering is completely invisible - no doubt obliterated by dirt & grime - Tom

Re: Plant identity

Perry Scheuerman
 

I am pretty sure the brown plant is curly dock. The plant itself is deep green, just the seed head turns dark brown. 

Perry Scheuerman

On Dec 1, 2019, at 6:56 PM, Jared Harper <harperandbrown@...> wrote:


I am trying to identify a plant that seems to grow widely in  the Flint Hills area of Kansas.  I have attached a photo that shows  this rusty brown colored plant.  The photo was taken in May.  Does anyong know the name of the plant?

Thanks!

Jared  Harper
Athens, GA
<Wild flowers.jpg>

Re: Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery

Bruce Smith
 

Bill,

That is a UTL car but not the frameless "Van Dyke" or, if you wish to be more accurate "Type V" car. Rather, close examination of the car will show that it has a frame, so this is the UTL "Type X" car that the Roundhouse olde time tank car is somewhat loosely based on.

You are, of course, completely correct about the brake wheel being a characteristic of this generation of UTL built cars.

Regards,
Bruce Smith
Auburn, AL


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Bill Daniels via Groups.Io <billinsf@...>
Sent: Sunday, December 1, 2019 6:49 PM
To: main@realstmfc.groups.io <main@realstmfc.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Tank Cars At Refinery
 
Steve, that was the typical arrangement on the Ban Dyke tankcars. Some still exist on the Cumbes & Toltec, albeit narrow gauged.

Bill Daniels
Santa Rosa California 


On Dec 1, 2019, at 4:39 PM, Steve Wolcott <swolcott@...> wrote:

Interesting brakewheel arrangement on that tank car.  Haven't seen that before.  
Steve Wolcott

Re: Plant identity

Thomas Birkett
 

Looks like what we call sumac on Oklahoma
Tom Birkett, Bartlesville



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