Date   

HO 'Car Works' Western 20-yard wood air dump brass car

Andy Carlson
 



Hello folks-
I have a new HO unpainted brass "The Car Works" car, as in the title. It is the Wood bed version. It doesn't  fit into my plans anymore, so I can offer it to anyone reading this post. $190, plus shipping. Contact me off list for details
Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


From: "oandle@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sunday, November 26, 2017 4:30 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Dump cars

 
Hi Richard,
  W&R Enterprises made two types in brass that were available years ago, one was a Clark Car Co. 30 cu yd side dump ( I'm using it for B&O) and one was a Magor side dump (I'm using this one for AC&Y).

The Car Works Co. also produced an all wood and all steel version of the Western 20 yd air dump in brass. Its been a long time since I've seen any of these cars offered on the secondary market.





Re: Mystic Terminal Company 70357

ROGER HINMAN
 

My understanding is MTC is an alternate reporting mark used on B&M owned cars to provide the accountants with a small sample of cars to analyze costs with. Definitely not a refrigerator car. 

Roger Hinman


-----Original Message-----
From: Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Sun, Feb 25, 2018 4:18 pm
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Mystic Terminal Company 70357

 

Bruce, it seems so - the 1940 ORER listing just says cars are stenciled B&M or MTC
but doesn't specify which cars are which.

Tim



I note the "AT HOME ON BOSTON & MAINE" lettering.  Is that to denote that the B&M serves as the "home road" for this car?

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bmrrhs/12832613143/


Re: Mystic Terminal Company 70357

Eric Lombard
 

Hello, Everyone...

My records indicate 25 cars out of B&M 70000-70499 (1919, ACF Lot 8571) received MTC marks in 1927. The weigh date on MTC 70357 looks like '27' so this is likely one of the 'new' B&M cars keeping its original serial number. Several other types of B&M cars were similarly marked MTC as the Mystic Terminal Co. came into existence at the same time. An additional car was added to the MTC series count between 1930 and 1931. Between 1932 and 1933 the MTC cars were folded into the B&M 70000-70499 ORER count but kept their MTC marks. I have a 1949 photo of MTC 70110 (ordinary vertical sheathing). Don't know if they kept MTC marks until retirement. The B&M 70000-70499 series (apparently including the MTC cars) was gone by mid 1954 when 70000-70987, a renumbered series of single-sheathed construction came into service.

Eric Lombard
Homewood, IL

On Sun, Feb 25, 2018 at 12:16 PM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

The caption for this undated photo says this is a refrigerator car but it looks more like a boxcar to me. What caught my eye was the horizontal sheathing.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bmrrhs/12832613143/

 

Anyone know more about this or similar cars?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Re: Mystic Terminal Company 70357

Tim O'Connor
 


Bruce, it seems so - the 1940 ORER listing just says cars are stenciled B&M or MTC
but doesn't specify which cars are which.

Tim



I note the "AT HOME ON BOSTON & MAINE" lettering.  Is that to denote that the B&M serves as the "home road" for this car?

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bmrrhs/12832613143/


Re: New Depressed Center Flatcar from Trainlife

Tim O'Connor
 

I just talked to Sharon yesterday they've had some health problems this winter.
She said she went to Timonium this month in spite of having pneumonia! I called
about some decals and learned that she prints the decals herself but can't do it
when the weather is rainy (as it has been recently)...

Tim

Thanks Tim, I will stick w/the ECK kit I plan to build as the Southern's 25001�I think that wwas the number in my plan, hah.

I was counting on F&C being at CCB to shop for one the their PRR well hole models

You are correct about Bruce's model.

Bill Welch


Re: Mystic Terminal Company 70357

Bruce Smith
 

​I note the "AT HOME ON BOSTON & MAINE" lettering.  Is that to denote that the B&M serves as the "home road" for this car?


Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL


From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2018 12:16 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Mystic Terminal Company 70357
 


The caption for this undated photo says this is a refrigerator car but it looks more like a boxcar to me. What caught my eye was the horizontal sheathing.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bmrrhs/12832613143/

 

Anyone know more about this or similar cars?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA




Re: New Depressed Center Flatcar from Trainlife

Bill Welch
 

Thanks Tim, I will stick w/the ECK kit I plan to build as the Southern's 25001—I think that was the number in my plan, hah.

I was counting on F&C being at CCB to shop for one the their PRR well hole models

You are correct about Bruce's model.

Bill Welch


Re: New Depressed Center Flatcar from Trainlife

Tim O'Connor
 


Bill, if I recall, these cars were based on WELDED steel cars built much later
than your 1955 time frame. The only HO models of a CAST steel car of 90 ton capacity
for pre-1960 modelers are the Eastern Car Works plastic model, and the Overland brass
import. Walthers also makes a die cast 90 ton car with a longer deck length based on
a later car built for the Soo Line (if I recall correctly). I've seen the Overland
models (which include a load) go for over $400 on Ebay.

Bruce Smith built a gorgeous model using the ECW kit and the Chooch "scotch boiler"
based on an actual photo of a NYC car with that very load.

Tim O'Connor




On page 134 of the new March 2018 is this blurb along with a photo of the model:

"Trainlife has also announced pre-orders of an exclusive-to-them HO scale depressed center flatcar, designed and manufactured by ExactRail. Combining common elements of several depressed center flatcars, this generic model contains General Steel Industries features and is a stand-in for similar depressed center flatcars built for many railroads. Included in the upcoming release are models decorated for TTX, Conrail, Pittsburgh & Lake Erie, New York Central, and Union Pacific MoW."

I know very little about depressed center flats. Hoping someone here can say just how "Generic" this model is and if has any potential for our pre-1960 era? Will it require major surgery or removal of anything? I realize there is just the one photo so what I am asking may be a heavy lift.

Bill Welch


Re: Mystic Terminal Company 70357

Tim O'Connor
 


The entire series 70000-70499 are listed as double sheathed GRAIN box cars in 1940.

Definitely not a refrigerator car.

Tim O'




I�m mystified.
 
That looks like a resheathed USRA double sheathed boxcar. Note the Murphy 5/5/5 ends and a 1919 build date.
 
Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

The caption for this undated photo says this is a refrigerator car but it looks more like a boxcar to me. What caught my eye was the horizontal sheathing.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bmrrhs/12832613143/


New Depressed Center Flatcar from Trainlife

Bill Welch
 

On page 134 of the new March 2018 is this blurb along with a photo of the model:

"Trainlife has also announced pre-orders of an exclusive-to-them HO scale depressed center flatcar, designed and manufactured by ExactRail. Combining common elements of several depressed center flatcars, this generic model contains General Steel Industries features and is a stand-in for similar depressed center flatcars built for many railroads. Included in the upcoming release are models decorated for TTX, Conrail, Pittsburgh & Lake Erie, New York Central, and Union Pacific MoW."

I know very little about depressed center flats. Hoping someone here can say just how "Generic" this model is and if has any potential for our pre-1960 era? Will it require major surgery or removal of anything? I realize there is just the one photo so what I am asking may be a heavy lift.

Bill Welch



Re: Mystic Terminal Company 70357

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 2/25/2018 10:16 AM, thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC] wrote:
this is a refrigerator car but it looks more like a boxcar to me

Interesting.

    On the next groups of pictures I really like the Purity Oats junkyard.  Right out of one of the old expensive kit maker:-D!

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Mystic Terminal Company 70357

Eric Hansmann
 

I’m mystified.

 

That looks like a resheathed USRA double sheathed boxcar. Note the Murphy 5/5/5 ends and a 1919 build date.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 


From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, February 25, 2018 12:17 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Mystic Terminal Company 70357

 




The caption for this undated photo says this is a refrigerator car but it looks more like a boxcar to me. What caught my eye was the horizontal sheathing.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bmrrhs/12832613143/

 

Anyone know more about this or similar cars?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Mystic Terminal Company 70357

thecitrusbelt@...
 

The caption for this undated photo says this is a refrigerator car but it looks more like a boxcar to me. What caught my eye was the horizontal sheathing.

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/bmrrhs/12832613143/

 

Anyone know more about this or similar cars?

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: MTH R-40-24 ??

Fred Jansz
 

I'd say: check Dick Harley's excellent PFE pages. It's mentioned there.
Cheers, Fred Jansz


Re: Lettering requirements

Charlie Vlk
 

John and Tony and all…

 

I understand the varieties of “Railroad Roman” as I’ve modified/created many such versions (hate making “&” characters…they’re the most difficult!!) for different road paint jobs.

 

Even if I had a drawing of the ARA lettering there would likely be variations between different cars as sign painters or different shops cutting stencils changed things around slightly.

I came across a number of L&P drawings at the Newberry Library and they referenced Standard ARA Lettering where usually a CB&Q drawing is called out.  

 

Thanks,
Charlie Vlk

___


50 links per inch chain

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I’ve been thinking about the use of 50 links per
inch chain for the linkage between the brake
cylinders and the rod leading to the end-of-car
brake wheel. I thought I’d do some math.



50 links per inch works out to an individual link
.0.020” long. I took a look at some prototype
drawings I have, from ACF via the St Louis
Merchatile library. Specifically, these drawings
were for the RI Autobox car, the 2016 Shake’n’Take
car. Those drawings depicted the linkage with the
links “relaxed,” that is not under tension, so
therefore the position they would be in with the
brakes released. (Or at least, not engaged by the
brake wheel.)



The main links as drawn in that chain scale out to
be very close to 3” long, 3” at HO scale is
0.034”. 1/.034 = 29.41, round off to 30, so a
chain with 30 links per inch would be accurate to
scale.



Bur there’s more to consider here: at either end
of three links in the middle of that connecting
chain on the RI car, are two longer links, which
scale out as drawn in the drawing I have as being
4½” long. 4½” at HO scale is .052”. 1/.052 =
19.23, round off to 20 links per inch.



The ACF drawings I obtained for the ERIE car, the
2018 Shake’n’Take project, show the chain
stretched taut, and are not informative as to
varying lengths of the links. But a photo of the
prototype car clearly shows not the two links at
the ends of the chain, but one longer link in the
middle of the chain.



On both the RI car and on the ERIE car I modeled,
I did this: For the RI car I use two links of 20
lpi chain at either end of three links of 30 lpi
chain and fastened those longer links to the rod
and clevis. Cutting the link is easily done with
a razor blade, For the ERIE car, I used a single
link of the 20 lpi chain between several links
(three each end as I recall) of 30 lpi chain,
which I fastened to the rod to the end of the car,
and to the brake cylinder’s clevis. .



It appears to me that 50 lpi chain isn’t really
necessary for freight car brake chain.



One other point: scale chain links are typically
round; prototype brake gear chain links are not,
they are oval. Given the limited number of links,
I’ve >>gently<< squeezed the links to get them to
be less round and closer to oval.



After all, if we’re going to go to the effort of
doing what I describe above, why not?



I will post (perhaps not tonight) some images from
the drawings and the image of the ERIE car.

Schuyler





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Ralston-Purina Ventilated Box Car (Reefer)

rwitt_2000
 

There is this site with photos and instructions for lots of train models: http://hoseeker.net/

It has listings for Laconia.

Bob Witt


General Arrangement Drawing BSCo Hopper ca. 1955

rwitt_2000
 

Currently on eBay


https://tinyurl.com/y8ure6ke


Bethlehem Steel Company car sales dept.  blueprint.  Titled--General Arrangement--50 ton hopper.  34 foot hopper.  Dated 1955. Drawings include--top, end, side and bottom elevations.  This is a company internal use, paper copy. Has been folded. Size is 32 x 60 inches.


The order number is 220 which from the RP Cyc article in Issue 1 the order was from the Reading.


eBay item number: 232676265409


https://www.ebay.com/itm/232676265409?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&fromMakeTrack=true


Bob Witt



Re: Pantone Numbers for Railroad Paints

Greg Martin
 

We went through all of this on 12/27/3017 and someone has decided to bring it up. In the final analogy color is subject and it fades/reduces in value at distance and when you stand looking at a car at close proximity what you see is several distortions of the same shade depending on the time of day, direction of light, intensity of light and the angle at which you are standing and looking at the surface. Take an art class at the college level... o[en your eyes and you mind, listen don't talk and learn about how an artist achieves a painting with the use of color that is as refined as a photograph.


Munsell was developed for the paint industry just as RAL and Pantone for ink. Why would you bring a knife to a gun fight.

In my system of shading that I have used for 30+ years I think to express the realism that exists and convey that to our modeling. How you achieve that optical shades of color on your freight car is up to you, I just find it more permanent and easier to do with an airbrush  and people see like it and express a desire to learn how to do it.

If you want to follow along I plan to do a series of my methodology in the media and I will truly use lots of media and technique.
 
Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean



Sent from AOL Desktop

In a message dated 2/24/2018 3:27:52 PM Pacific Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:


That is all true. But Pantone colors are often the basis for paint company
colors. I know George Bishop (Accupaint) had a "rolodex" full set of Pantone
cards and used them for paint specifications for his paint manufacturer - and
later for color specifications to Microscale, after he stopped doing his own
silkscreening. The reason is practical: A manufacturer KNOWS how to recreate each
Pantone color. George had an excellent eye for color, so his choices were
within a tiny margin of error compared to actual prototype drift cards. The
human eye can't distinguish 16 million colors, and our color acuity drops off
rapidly with old age.

Tim O'Connor


Re: Pantone Numbers for Railroad Paints

Todd Sullivan
 

Tim O'Connor said,

"The human eye can't distinguish 16 million colors, and our color acuity drops off
rapidly with old age."

That's wonderful news.  Now I don't have to worry about being quite so accurate - I can just charge it off to old eyes if anyone objects to my color renditions!  ;-)

Todd Sullivan.

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