Date   

Advertisement: Plastic Journal Box Lid (Circa 1942)

Bob Chaparro
 

Advertisement: Plastic Journal Box Lid (Circa 1942)

Material from the Science History Institute:

https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/m039k614p

Click and scroll to enlarge.

A freight car detail that can be made in plastic that will be materially accurate.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: More TCWX Tank Cars: (1931)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: More TCWX Tank Cars: (1931)

Photo from the Science History Institute:

https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/nk322f14s/viewer/ff365613n

Click and scroll to enlarge.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: TCWX Tank Car 115 (1931)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: TCWX Tank Car 115 (1931)

Photo from the Science History Institute:

https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/8w32r666s/viewer/cn69m512g

Click and scroll to enlarge.

Also Reading boxcar 100053.

TCWX are the reporting marks for Charles Lennig & Company

The company evidently had a Baldwin locomotive:

https://digitalcollections.smu.edu/digital/collection/rwy/id/2900/

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Orange NP Wood Reefers

radiodial868
 

These factory painted brass W&R Enterprises Northern Pacific Reefers pop up now and then. Was there ever such a orange paint scheme in place of the usual yellowish sides?


Thx,
-------------------
RJ Dial

Mendocino, CA


Re: HO kit wanted

Kenneth Montero
 

Hugh,

When seeking this kit from other sources, be aware that Funaro & Carmerlengo also list as item 6660 the Canadian Pacific 1930 Mini-box car 1/AB brakes, so be sure to describe the model that you are seeking.

The model that you are seeking is a one-piece body kit. The same car is listed as a flat kit (2 cars in the kit) as item 6601.

I don't know what Funaro & Carmerlengo have in stock or can produce in the near future. Contact F&C to see what they have.

Ken Montero

On 10/07/2020 4:11 PM Hugh Guillaume via groups.io <mguill1224@...> wrote:


Looking for Funaro & Camarlengo 6660 NYC steel gondola.  Hugh T Guillaume mguill1224 at aol dot com


Re: HO kit wanted

nyc3001 .
 

I called F&C two years ago about the rebuilt gon kits, but Sharon told me that they were not available anymore; however, the kits may be rerun in the future. They seem to come up on eBay every once in a while. If someone is willing to sell me one or more of the Sunshine 67.29 or 67.30 USRA NYC clone kits, I am willing to let one of my F&C kits go. I have one too many F&C rebuilt gon kits, but converting a rebuilt car to a clone seems somewhat feasible.

-Phil

On Wed, Oct 7, 2020 at 6:24 PM Garth Groff and Sally Sanford <mallardlodge1000@...> wrote:
Hugh,

This car is still listed in F&C's online catalog: http://fandckits.com/HOFreight/6600.html . This is with a one-piece body.

This car used to be in the bagged flat kit line (I have one), but I don't see those low-priced kits on their web site. They were still listed on the last flyer I got from F&C, but that was some time ago. You could always contact them for availability.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Wed, Oct 7, 2020 at 4:11 PM Hugh Guillaume via groups.io <mguill1224=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looking for Funaro & Camarlengo 6660 NYC steel gondola.  Hugh T Guillaume mguill1224 at aol dot com


Re: Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks Elden and Ed for the drop-down hand brake information. All of my loads so far would not interfere with or threaten the brake staffs, so I guess modeling the staff raised is acceptable. If I do a pole or lumber load, I’ll model the staff in the lowered position, assuming the prototype car had a drop-down hand brake.

 

Nelson

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Wednesday, October 07, 2020 12:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

 

Nelson;

 

Every RR may have done it differently, but when they started encountering problems with loads interfering with brake staffs/wheels, some RRs came up with the idea of removable, or in some cases, pivoting brake assemblies (think USRA gon).  Obviously in the case of temporarily removable brake staffs, you couldn’t set the brakes, so you had to couple to other cars, in a string, to have brakes.  The pivoting brake was designed to be used pivoted, although in practice this may have been problematic (the take up spool was 90 degrees off).

 

Retracting brake shaft/wheel assemblies were another way.  The idea was to drop the staff and wheel down out of the way of an interfering load.  There was a spring loaded button in the cases I know of, that you pressed to release the staff from its high position.  The staff had to be somewhat shorter to not drop into the roadbed or rail (crossovers).

 

If, for instance, you had a flat with a load that interfered with the brake staff/wheel, you dropped it for the duration.  Otherwise, maybe just during loading/unloading.  LOTS of brake staffs were bent during loading, or by shifted loads.

 

Sometimes forgetful crew left the wheel down, and those folks setting the brake had to lift it up to do so.

 

The attached shots of PRR F49 show it in high and lowered positions.  Note how close the staff is to roadbed in the last photo

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 12:57 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

 

I don’t recall seeing prototype or model photos of loaded or empty flat cars with the brake staffs in the retracted position during operation. What was prototype practice for retractable hand brakes? Were they lowered only during loading and unloading?

 

Nelson Moyer


Re: HO kit wanted

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Hugh,

This car is still listed in F&C's online catalog: http://fandckits.com/HOFreight/6600.html . This is with a one-piece body.

This car used to be in the bagged flat kit line (I have one), but I don't see those low-priced kits on their web site. They were still listed on the last flyer I got from F&C, but that was some time ago. You could always contact them for availability.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


On Wed, Oct 7, 2020 at 4:11 PM Hugh Guillaume via groups.io <mguill1224=aol.com@groups.io> wrote:
Looking for Funaro & Camarlengo 6660 NYC steel gondola.  Hugh T Guillaume mguill1224 at aol dot com


Re: Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

Eric Hansmann
 

There are actually three NYC&HR boxcars in the image with three different lettering styles. The car with the NYCL oval might have been the one most recently shopped with the newest lettering presentation.

 

I’m surprised no one has mentioned the left-opening doors on three of the six boxcars in the photo. It was a common feature in this era.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Kenneth Montero
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 2:32 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

 

To the right of the Big Four boxcar are two very different New York Central and Hudson River boxcars - very different sizes, lettering schemes, trucks.

 

Ken Montero

On 10/07/2020 12:19 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

 

 

Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A8223.336.RR/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

PRR Boxcar 13801 and other boxcars also seen.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

Benjamin Hom
 

Schuyler Larrabee wrote:
"I find the “reporting marks” on the first car interesting:
'PENNA. CO.'"

This indicates a car assigned to Lines West of Pittsburgh, which were operated by a separate holding company from PRR between 1870 and 1920.  Think of it as something akin to the Eastern and Western Roman Empires.


Ben Hom


HO kit wanted

 

Looking for Funaro & Camarlengo 6660 NYC steel gondola.  Hugh T Guillaume mguill1224 at aol dot com


Re: Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

Mont Switzer
 

And of course there were the piggy back flat cars that were loaded circus style.  A bridge plates would most likely lay right over the vertical hand brake after it was retracted.  Another reason that made side loading with cranes more efficient. but that was not common in our era.

 

Mont Switzer


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Gatwood, Elden J SAD [elden.j.gatwood@...]
Sent: Wednesday, October 07, 2020 1:26 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

Nelson;

 

Every RR may have done it differently, but when they started encountering problems with loads interfering with brake staffs/wheels, some RRs came up with the idea of removable, or in some cases, pivoting brake assemblies (think USRA gon).  Obviously in the case of temporarily removable brake staffs, you couldn’t set the brakes, so you had to couple to other cars, in a string, to have brakes.  The pivoting brake was designed to be used pivoted, although in practice this may have been problematic (the take up spool was 90 degrees off).

 

Retracting brake shaft/wheel assemblies were another way.  The idea was to drop the staff and wheel down out of the way of an interfering load.  There was a spring loaded button in the cases I know of, that you pressed to release the staff from its high position.  The staff had to be somewhat shorter to not drop into the roadbed or rail (crossovers).

 

If, for instance, you had a flat with a load that interfered with the brake staff/wheel, you dropped it for the duration.  Otherwise, maybe just during loading/unloading.  LOTS of brake staffs were bent during loading, or by shifted loads.

 

Sometimes forgetful crew left the wheel down, and those folks setting the brake had to lift it up to do so.

 

The attached shots of PRR F49 show it in high and lowered positions.  Note how close the staff is to roadbed in the last photo

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 12:57 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

 

I don’t recall seeing prototype or model photos of loaded or empty flat cars with the brake staffs in the retracted position during operation. What was prototype practice for retractable hand brakes? Were they lowered only during loading and unloading?

 

Nelson Moyer

Attachments:


Re: Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Guys;

 

During the conversions of F30A and F30D to TT service, they put in long ramps to join the cars so they could roll the trailers off, elephant-style.  In doing so, they had to cut into the decks of the cars to allow the drop brake installation, so as not to catch on truck/trailer u/f’s.  I do not have good data or pics of the conversion, unfortunately, but you can see part of it in this pic.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Gatwood, Elden J SAD
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 1:27 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

 

Nelson;

 

Every RR may have done it differently, but when they started encountering problems with loads interfering with brake staffs/wheels, some RRs came up with the idea of removable, or in some cases, pivoting brake assemblies (think USRA gon).  Obviously in the case of temporarily removable brake staffs, you couldn’t set the brakes, so you had to couple to other cars, in a string, to have brakes.  The pivoting brake was designed to be used pivoted, although in practice this may have been problematic (the take up spool was 90 degrees off).

 

Retracting brake shaft/wheel assemblies were another way.  The idea was to drop the staff and wheel down out of the way of an interfering load.  There was a spring loaded button in the cases I know of, that you pressed to release the staff from its high position.  The staff had to be somewhat shorter to not drop into the roadbed or rail (crossovers).

 

If, for instance, you had a flat with a load that interfered with the brake staff/wheel, you dropped it for the duration.  Otherwise, maybe just during loading/unloading.  LOTS of brake staffs were bent during loading, or by shifted loads.

 

Sometimes forgetful crew left the wheel down, and those folks setting the brake had to lift it up to do so.

 

The attached shots of PRR F49 show it in high and lowered positions.  Note how close the staff is to roadbed in the last photo

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Nelson Moyer
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 12:57 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

 

I don’t recall seeing prototype or model photos of loaded or empty flat cars with the brake staffs in the retracted position during operation. What was prototype practice for retractable hand brakes? Were they lowered only during loading and unloading?

 

Nelson Moyer


Re: Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

Schuyler Larrabee
 

I find the “reporting marks” on the first car interesting:

 

“PENNA. CO.

 

Schuyler

 

On 10/07/2020 12:19 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

 

 

Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A8223.336.RR/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

PRR Boxcar 13801 and other boxcars also seen.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

Kenneth Montero
 

To the right of the Big Four boxcar are two very different New York Central and Hudson River boxcars - very different sizes, lettering schemes, trucks.

Ken Montero

On 10/07/2020 12:19 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A8223.336.RR/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

PRR Boxcar 13801 and other boxcars also seen.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

charles slater
 

They were required to be in the up position unless the car was covered by a load over the end, or used as an idler car between two other cars and was covered.
Charlie Slater

Sent from Outlook



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Charlie Vlk <cvlk@...>
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 11:18 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)
 

All-

The N&W boxcar looks like it has a door that closes to the inside of the car…I don’t recall seeing that arrangement before.

It is also interesting to see how many early cars had what we would call “Plug” doors where the door cammed into the opening with a locking bar.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 11:20 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

 

Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A8223.336.RR/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

PRR Boxcar 13801 and other boxcars also seen.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

Tony Thompson
 

Charlie Vlk wrote:

It is also interesting to see how many early cars had what we would call “Plug” doors where the door cammed into the opening with a locking bar.

     Around the turn of the 20th century, they were called "flush" doors.

Tony Thompson




Re: Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

Charlie Vlk
 

All-

The N&W boxcar looks like it has a door that closes to the inside of the car…I don’t recall seeing that arrangement before.

It is also interesting to see how many early cars had what we would call “Plug” doors where the door cammed into the opening with a locking bar.

Charlie Vlk

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Wednesday, October 7, 2020 11:20 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

 

Photo: Big Four Boxcar (1906)

A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:

https://historicpittsburgh.org/islandora/object/pitt%3A8223.336.RR/viewer

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

PRR Boxcar 13801 and other boxcars also seen.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Boxcar 559589 (Undated)

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: PRR Boxcar 559589 (Undated)
A photo from the Historic Pittsburgh website:
Ignore the flat car. Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

  Heck with ignoring the flat car! That's a terrific load, a power shear, from Mesta Machine.

Tony Thompson




Re: Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

Ed Hawkins
 



On Oct 7, 2020, at 11:57 AM, Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

I don’t recall seeing prototype or model photos of loaded or empty flat cars with the brake staffs in the retracted position during operation. What was prototype practice for retractable hand brakes? Were they lowered only during loading and unloading?

Nelson,
A number of hand brake companies from the 1930s thru 1950s produced “drop shaft” versions for flat cars. While I don’t have any written procedures that involve the operation of them, it would make sense for the shaft and wheel to be dropped any time a load would potentially interfere or damage the hand brake in left in the up position.

As an example, on pages 1086-1087 the 1940 Car Builders’ Cyclopedia has photos and a description of the Superior Drop Shaft hand brake. The flat cars typically had a half-round section removed from the deck boards at the “B” end, such that the top of the brake wheel could be lowered flush with the top of the wood deck. 

RP CYC Volume 10 also illustrates various drop shaft hand brakes spread from pages 39 thru 54. 
Hope this helps.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

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