Date   

Re: Emery Boards (was Pan Pastels)

Charles Peck
 

Soft materials such as brass, solder, and plastic do indeed clog files.  Before filing soft material,
I fill the file with chalk, regular blackboard chalk.  The chalk will allow the file to work but
will make it much easier to clean afterwards.
Chuck Peck

On Mon, May 15, 2017 at 1:11 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


I use a brass "bristle" brush and it cleans the files just fine. I guess if one got really
gunked up I'd take it outside for a grit blast. But I also use emery boards, and the newer
brands of foam-core files that come in many shapes and levels of abrasion from 60 to 600...

Tim O'Connor



I have used a file card, but it never got all the gunk out and eventually the files were ruined. Emery boards are much cheaper than new files. They are also handy for tight spaces, especially for cleaning out narrow slots.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff



Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Tim O'Connor
 


And the train has just emerged from the Hermosa tunnel. Lots of steam in there!
So maybe a tiny layer of condensation combined with film, lighting, shadows, and
scanning effects. Not much to be concluded from all this.

My only question is - is the reefer an R-30-21, or an R-40-21 ?

Tim O'Connor




I believe some of you are seeing are image artifacts. The digitized image appears to have high contrast and the dark lines along the roof ribs are just very dark shadows. Look at the back of the coal bunker it is also completely black as is the rear of the first tender.

Bob Witt
==================

Agree with the hard shadows on the near side of the seam caps, but I thought we were talking about the "puddle" effect surrounding the base of each seam cap.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/25558915051/sizes/k/?ytcheck=2f3420ff0e6b09980c0e67bbdfeb9d66

Dennis Storzek


Re: Emery Boards (was Pan Pastels)

Tim O'Connor
 


I use a brass "bristle" brush and it cleans the files just fine. I guess if one got really
gunked up I'd take it outside for a grit blast. But I also use emery boards, and the newer
brands of foam-core files that come in many shapes and levels of abrasion from 60 to 600...

Tim O'Connor



I have used a file card, but it never got all the gunk out and eventually the files were ruined. Emery boards are much cheaper than new files. They are also handy for tight spaces, especially for cleaning out narrow slots.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff


Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

SUVCWORR@...
 

Bruce,

Looking at the twin 40's when assembled as a unit ready to be installed on a ship, I am wondering if it wasn;t a center of gravity issue.  With the well the center of gravity would be lowered and avoid rolling the load.  This would be of particular concern on some "sharp" cures.

Rich Orr


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]
To: PRR@yahoogroups. com ; STMFC cataldotj@... [STMFC]
Sent: Mon, May 15, 2017 9:47 am
Subject: [STMFC] PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns



Folks,

Looking over the PRRT&HS flat car book, I was reminded by the text that the F37 flat cars were built during WWII as a consequence of the nearly identical FNA cars being almost complete obligated to the U.S. Navy to ship twin 40 mm anti-aircraft (Bofors) mounts. Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram?  I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."






Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Richard Townsend
 

One idea occurred to me. It looks like the car had been recently reweighed. If there had been repairs might they have included applying some kind of sealant to the seam caps? Perhaps with some fairly substantial overspray?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: destorzek@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, May 15, 2017 11:47 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

 



---In STMFC@..., wrote :

I believe some of you are seeing are image artifacts. The digitized image appears to have high contrast and the dark lines along the roof ribs are just very dark shadows. Look at the back of the coal bunker it is also completely black as is the rear of the first tender.

Bob Witt
==================
Agree with the hard shadows on the near side of the seam caps, but I thought we were talking about the "puddle" effect surrounding the base of each seam cap.


Dennis Storzek


Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <rwitt_2000@...> wrote :

I believe some of you are seeing are image artifacts. The digitized image appears to have high contrast and the dark lines along the roof ribs are just very dark shadows. Look at the back of the coal bunker it is also completely black as is the rear of the first tender.

Bob Witt
==================
Agree with the hard shadows on the near side of the seam caps, but I thought we were talking about the "puddle" effect surrounding the base of each seam cap.


Dennis Storzek


Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

rwitt_2000
 

I believe some of you are seeing are image artifacts. The digitized image appears to have high contrast and the dark lines along the roof ribs are just very dark shadows. Look at the back of the coal bunker it is also completely black as is the rear of the first tender.

Bob Witt


Re: Don't be chicken

Louie B. Hydrick
 

Greetings,
 
In the time we are addressing, labor was comparatively inexpensive, and hand loading/unloading of many commodities was common. Logistics of returning empty coops made the use of separate coops financially unfeasible if not impractical.
 
I have a rather extensive treatise from the Charleston & Western Carolina Railroad about the difficulty of getting shippers to use consistent produce baskets to maximize the use of space in various reefers and produce (aka watermelon) cars.  Produce remains still during shipment, and does not need a lid, so the baskets could "nest".  Not so with poultry.
 
A 24" passageway would be snug, but not impractical for the average person in that time frame.  We as a nation have definitely gotten fatter; however, there are still homes built today with one or more 24" doors, mostly to closets. 
 
I imagine that hand loading chickens would be like most other manual labor on the farm, experience would breed expertise.
 
Louie B. Hydrick
Associate Broker
RE/MAX Partners
4316 Washington Road
Evans GA 30809-3957

706-832-6263 Mobile
706-922-7355 Office
706-922-7356 Fax
706-922-7368 Direct

GA Lic. 207874 SC Lic. 14865

Or visit me on the web at:
www.csrahomesandland.com
or
www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Dennis;

I was not able to find either during the research for the book, but it is possible there is info in the PRRT&HS archives, somewhere. I wished I had found a photo. I am sure Bruce is right, and that the well was needed to accommodate the width of the platform on its side.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 10:37 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [STMFC] Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns







---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <smithbf@...> wrote :

Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram? I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.
================
Not quite what you are looking for, just general info on the application, but given the illustration of the rotating deck with NINE men standing on it, I suspect they were wider than 10' and needed to be shipped on edge.

Blockedhttp://hamptonroadsnavalmuseum.blogspot.com/2014/09/the-40mm-bofors-gun.html


Dennis Storzek


Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

Bruce Smith
 

Dennis,

Not to get too technical but that’s a “quad 40”, which is basically two twin 40s.  The text in the flat car book indicates “twin 40’s” and these did exist as independent mounts, but if it is the quad mount, shipping on edge with the platform in the well would definitely make a lot of sense!

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On May 15, 2017, at 9:37 AM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :
Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram?  I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.
================
Not quite what you are looking for, just general info on the application, but given the illustration of the rotating deck with NINE men standing on it, I suspect they were wider than 10' and needed to be shipped on edge.


Dennis Storzek




Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

Interesting, Bob. I’d speculate that the dark area around the ribs is condensation. The ribs are exposed to the cold inside the reefer, and are comparatively cool on the exterior...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/25558915051/sizes/k/
======================

Interesting speculation, Schuyler, but one problem... Since the SRECo panel roofs don't use carlines, there is nothing under the "rib" that penetrates any deeper into the insulation than the rest of the roof, therefore no reason for the ribs to be colder. The carline structure is replaced in these roofs by the combination of the upstanding flange on each edge of the roof panel, riveted to the U shaped pressed steel seam cap. Because of the rivet penetrations on the sides of the seam caps, some roads specified car cement on the seam caps to try to head off any leaks. To me the photo appears to show an additional application of fresh car cement on an older roof. 

Perhaps Tony can comment on PFE's roof maintenance practices.

Dennis Storzek
 


Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :
Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram?  I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.
================
Not quite what you are looking for, just general info on the application, but given the illustration of the rotating deck with NINE men standing on it, I suspect they were wider than 10' and needed to be shipped on edge.


Dennis Storzek


Semet-Solvay HO scale tank car build

Eric Hansmann
 

Jim Kubanick shares tips and techniques to build a Yarmouth Model Works tank car kit. Check out Jim’s work building a neat model of an AC&F Type 27 prototype on the Resin Car Works blog.

 

http://blog.resincarworks.com/semet-solvay-type-27-10k-gallon-tank-car/

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy


PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

Bruce Smith
 

Folks,

Looking over the PRRT&HS flat car book, I was reminded by the text that the F37 flat cars were built during WWII as a consequence of the nearly identical FNA cars being almost complete obligated to the U.S. Navy to ship twin 40 mm anti-aircraft (Bofors) mounts. Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram?  I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




Re: Emery Boards (was Pan Pastels)

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tony,

I have used a file card, but it never got all the gunk out and eventually the files were ruined. Emery boards are much cheaper than new files. They are also handy for tight spaces, especially for cleaning out narrow slots.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 5/15/17 6:59 AM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
Um, I have a file card for fine-toothed files and it cleans them just fine.
Tony Thompson 


On May 15, 2017, at 5:38 PM, Garth Groff sarahsan@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Tim,

I use "feathered" toothpicks for fine detail painting on figures (especially for eyes). I shave mine down with emery boards, a very useful and rarely noticed tool. Emery boards are especially good for smoothing styrene. Styrene clogs files and is nearly impossible to clean from file teeth.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 5/15/17 12:45 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 


Me too! Also various paint brushes, sometimes damp with either distilled
water, or alcohol. Or a flat toothpick which can be trimmed with a knife
to a sharp point or "feathered" with a file. Just about anything, really. :-)

Tim O'




Re: Emery Boards (was Pan Pastels)

Tony Thompson
 

Um, I have a file card for fine-toothed files and it cleans them just fine.
Tony Thompson 


On May 15, 2017, at 5:38 PM, Garth Groff sarahsan@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Tim,

I use "feathered" toothpicks for fine detail painting on figures (especially for eyes). I shave mine down with emery boards, a very useful and rarely noticed tool. Emery boards are especially good for smoothing styrene. Styrene clogs files and is nearly impossible to clean from file teeth.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 5/15/17 12:45 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 


Me too! Also various paint brushes, sometimes damp with either distilled
water, or alcohol. Or a flat toothpick which can be trimmed with a knife
to a sharp point or "feathered" with a file. Just about anything, really. :-)

Tim O'



Re: Emery Boards (was Pan Pastels)

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tim,

I use "feathered" toothpicks for fine detail painting on figures (especially for eyes). I shave mine down with emery boards, a very useful and rarely noticed tool. Emery boards are especially good for smoothing styrene. Styrene clogs files and is nearly impossible to clean from file teeth.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 5/15/17 12:45 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:
 


Me too! Also various paint brushes, sometimes damp with either distilled
water, or alcohol. Or a flat toothpick which can be trimmed with a knife
to a sharp point or "feathered" with a file. Just about anything, really. :-)

Tim O'



Re: Application techniques for Pan Pastels

Tim O'Connor
 


Me too! Also various paint brushes, sometimes damp with either distilled
water, or alcohol. Or a flat toothpick which can be trimmed with a knife
to a sharp point or "feathered" with a file. Just about anything, really. :-)

Tim O'

-----------------

I've been applying them with Micro Brushes which provide a lot of control
since the brush head is so small.

Jack Burgess

-----------------


I know quite a few of you all have been using Pan Pastels for weathering.  I
finally bought a few basic colors and have been playing with them.  I
thought I'd ask what techniques people are using to apply them.

Schuyler


Re: Shell tank cars in the northeast

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Hi Brian,
 
You can always do one of the Shell RPX cars that became UTLX with the acquisition of the fleet.  Shell had a number of ACF type 21 8000 gallon cars.  See
 
 
for an example as the Shell car.  UTLX called the cars not built to their in-house designs Class Z and numbered their 8000 gallon Class Z cars without heaters (like the P2k car) in the range between 71000 and 78499, although not all these cars were ex-Shell or Type 21's.  However, Richard Hendrickson did a lot of consulting with Life Like on their P2k projects.  So, if you can find one already lettered UTLX, it is very probable that the number is correct.
 
Sunshine did both types of 8000 gallon X-3's which can be found on the resale market from time to time.  Resin Car Works may eventually reissue improved versions of these cars, but the Class Z 8000 gallon cars were also plentiful.
 
I hope this is helpful information.
 
Regards,
Steve Hile



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Sunday, May 14, 2017 6:57 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shell tank cars in the northeast

 

List,


Thanks to everyone that offered information.  It seems what I REALLY need is another UTLX tanker.  Now if someone would make with an 8K X-3....

Cheers,


Brian LaManna/Moncton, NB


From: STMFC@... on behalf of 'John Riddell' riddellj@... [STMFC]
Sent: May 14, 2017 11:44:34 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Shell tank cars in the northeast
 
 

In addition Shell Oil had 68 cars in reporting marks SCAX until 1956.
 
John Riddell


Re: Shell tank cars in the northeast

David
 

8k X-3s were fairly uncommon: 1,675 in two styles, versus 4,150 6k tanks and 12,349 10k tanks.

David Thompson

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