Date   

WESTERFIELD MODELS Newsletter, Vol 6, No 2, May, 2017

dahminator68
 

Hello Steam Era Modelers:

We are pleased to announce that Westerfield Models is having a NATIONAL TRAIN DAY SALE!  

This sale will be in effect from 12:01 am Wednesday, May 10 through 11:59 pm Sunday, May 21, 2017 and is available for orders placed on our Website, 
Mail Order Form (a PDF file), or via Phone order (303-658-9343), from 9am to 5pm, Pacific Time Zone.  We can also accept orders via email, payment made by Paypal Invoice.  
We accept all major credit cards.  Link to our Mail Order Form PDF:   http://westerfieldmodels.com/74822.html

Mailed in orders must be postmarked by Monday, May 22, 2017.   
Please indicate the sale item(s) chosen in the comment section.
 
Choose one of the following sale Options:  Please Note:  All Sales Options are for like items only.  For example, buy 2 Kits and get the third Kit at 25% off, or buy 5 Decals and get the third decal at 75%                                                                       off or buy 6 Kits and get the 6th Kit FREE.  These sales are for the following types of Items Only:  Kits, Decals, Detail Parts & Info Disks.    See Restrictions Below*.

FIRST OPTION:         Buy 2 Items and get 25% OFF the Second Item.
                                  USE COUPON CODE:  BUY2SALE           

SECOND OPTION:    Buy 3 Items and get 50% OFF the Third Item.
                                  USE COUPON CODE:  BUY3SALE

THIRD OPTION:        Buy 5 Items and get 75% OFF the Fifth Item.
                                  USE COUPON CODE:  BUY5SALE
 
FOURTH OPTION:     Buy 6 Items and get the 6th Item FREE.
                                  USE COUPON CODE:  BUY6ONEFREE

Please note that for all sales, items from multiple sales may be combined in one order.   Sale Coupon Codes may be used multiple times in same order.
Also, check our website often during the sale period as we may list other special sale discounts.
National Train Day is on May 13, 2017.

Please Note:  Shipping is not included.

All of our Kits are available at our secure website: westerfieldmodels.com

*RESTRICTIONS ON SALE ITEMS:  KITS - The following Kits are NOT eligible for FREE KITS:  All Kits Priced $44 and Higher, Sets #7598, #7599
                                                        DISKS - The following Disks are NOT eligible for FREE DISKS:  ACF Disk, PRR ORER Disks I, II, III or the set of 3
                                                        TRUCKS - Tahoe Model Works Trucks are also NOT included in the sale.  Tahoe truck large quantity discounts are available separately, listed under each Tahoe Truck type.

Westerfield Kits include new HO scale unpainted urethane castings, and are complete with quality details, detailed instruction/history sheets 
and proprietary decals covering all versions of the prototype car.   Trucks and couplers are not included but are available separately.  Please see below
 
We are also pleased to announce that TAHOE MODEL WORKS Trucks and Kadee Trucks and Couplers are now available through Westerfield Models.  Tahoe Trucks are now listed on our Website Secure 
Model Store under "Tahoe Model Works Trucks".   All fifteen of the Tahoe Truck types are available with any of three wheelset types:  Frame only, RP-25 
Wheelsets, Semi-Scale Wheelsets.  We also have a "Tahoe Trucks Listing" page on our Main website page that provides information on each type of truck and, in some cases a user list for that truck.
Kadee Trucks and Couplers are available on our Website Secure Model Store under "Add-On Trucks and Couplers for Kits".  Please note that Kadee products are only available with the purchase of a Kit, while Tahoe Trucks are available separately.
 
Link to our Tahoe Trucks page:    https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/index.php?cPath=264
Link to our Kadee Add-On page:  https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/index.php?cPath=153

Westerfield Models is available for custom casting work.  We can make castings from your patterns, both from your custom masters or your 3D printed masters.  Please see our Website, Main Page "Custom Castings" for more information.  Link to page:  http://westerfieldmodels.com/116622.html

Westerfield Models now has a Facebook and YouTube page where we post photos and videos of our new projects and Modelers photos of completed or in process Westerfield Model Freight cars.
Please send us your photos and videos of your completed or in process Westerfield Model Kits, along with a description of your work, details used, painting methods, etc.
Please send to our email:                 westerfieldmodels@....
Check out our Facebook page here:  https://www.facebook.com/westerfieldmodels/         
If on Facebook, you can use:            @westerfieldmodels.
 
Our Newsletter is now sent out through our website. If your email listing ends with "NL", you are subscribed. If your email ends with "UN", you are unsubscribed and should not be receiving this email. If your email does not have either initials, and you would like to subscribe, please click on this link: http://lists.westerfieldmodels.com/mailman/listinfo/westerfield-newsletter-list-5.   If you want your email changed to "UN" - unsubscribed, please send us an email at westerfieldmodels@.... Once subscribed (with the "NL" on your email), you may change your subscription on the above website page, or email us atwesterfieldmodels@... and we will be glad to make any changes for you.

Questions or Suggestions?  Feel free to email us at:  westerfieldmodels@....
 
Thank you,
Andrew Dahm
Westerfield Models, LLC
westerfieldmodels.com
westerfieldmodels@...
Like us on Facebook!




Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: 1943 Ventilated car quantities

George Eichelberger
 

Another thing to realize about published quantities of "vents" in and after the WWII era, they were really box cars that happened to have ventilated doors and maybe end vents. I expect by the time we see dramatic reductions in vent quantities in the RER, they were being scrapped as obsolete plain box cars rather than from produce or watermelon service.

I did not live in a watermelon producing are of Florida from the mid 1950s (Venice and Sarasota) but all of the local celery, citrus and tomato crops were shipped in ice refrigerator cars. About the only area I saw Coast Line vents was on their lines in the Lake Okeechobee area but most were in company service and a few carrying sugar during that harvest season.

Ike


Re: CO-2

Jim Betz
 

Craig/all,

So it would seem fairly likely that small or even normal capacity
bottling plants would have stored their CO-2 in a tank somewhere
inside ... ???
Or even that those 200 gal. supply tanks were "connected
directly to the bottling line" as they were used with two or more
of them so they could switch from an empty to a full without
interrupting the bottling line.
Based upon the stated "one truck load per week" it seems
easy to conclude that the amount of CO-2, per bottle of pop,
was fairly small.
- Jim B.


Re: THINNER FOR FLOQUIL SOLVENT BASED PAINTS

Jim Betz
 

Hi - thought I'd chime in ...

I have been using solvent based paints since the mid-80's. I
still have a small supply of both Diosol and Scalecoat thinner
and use them for air brushing ... but use lacquer thinner for
clean up. I intend to switch to using thinner when the brand
specific cans are empty (if I'm still using solvent paints).
I do think that there are some jobs that are simply easier/better
when using solvent paints - and I prefer lacquers to enamels
(but only slightly) and so I almost always use a lacquer. At
least one of the reasons for this choice is that the colors
for "my RR" aren't well done by acrylics.

If you are having trouble using paint thinner with Floquil or
Scalecoat I suggest you start using less of it during the first
time you use it and then add more later to get the amount
of 'thinness' you want. I also use this approach for re-instating
a bottle of paint that has lost too much of its thinner due to
being stored too long after being opened. I have almost
always been able to recover the bottle ... if I start with only a
little of the thinner (brand specific) and keep adding until I
get it to where I want/need it. It's takes a little longer but is
easier (also quicker and cheaper) than having to go to the
hobby store to get a new bottle.
To clean up my air brush what I do is to shoot some
straight thinner thru it (a small amount), wait a little
while to let the thinner work, then shoot some more. I
shoot into a piece of clean paper towel and when it
sprays 'clean' ... I switch to disassembly and soaking
the parts in straight thinner. All standard practices -
there's nothing special/secret about these.

Yes, I have a paint booth with a fan that sucks clean
air into it and takes the bad air outside our home. And I
use a high filtration paint mask when shooting solvent
based paints.
- Jim B.

________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________
3a. Re: THINNER FOR FLOQUIL SOLVENT BASED PAINTS
Posted by: "anthony wagner" anycw1@sbcglobal.net tonyw738
Date: Thu May 11, 2017 6:52 pm ((PDT))

For what it's worth, I used lacquer thinner with both Floquil and Scalecoat before I switched to acrylics. It worked better with Floquil and saved some cash over buying brand specific thinners. A quart can would last a long time. Tony Wagner

On Thursday, May 11, 2017 3:31 PM, "Rod Miller rod@rodmiller.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

On 5/11/17 1:09 PM, Nelson Moyer npmoyer@hotmail.com [STMFC] wrote:
You’re rumor is urban legend. If you read the fine print on the can, you will
see that the ingredients include a number of organic solvents that are
immiscible with water. If you wish to experiment, put a little water in a
small jar and add a little lacquer thinner. Your will see water on the bottom
layer and lacquer thinner on top. If you shake the jar and let it stand, the
solvents will separate into two layers. I don’t have my CRC handbook any
more, but you look up the solubility tables if you have one available.

Nelson Moyer

From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] Sent: Thursday,
May 11, 2017 2:34 PM To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re:
THINNER FOR FLOQUIL SOLVENT BASED PAINTS



It is rumored that the big box lacquer thinners are cut with water.

For painting I buy lacquer thinner from auto paint supply stores. For clean
up I use the big box thinner.

-- Rod Miller
Good info, thanks.


Re: 1943 Ventilated car quantities

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Eric,

Our readers should note that except for the D&H, all of these are "y'all" railroads.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff


On 5/12/17 11:47 AM, 'Eric Hansmann' eric@... [STMFC] wrote:
 

A copy of the January 1943 ORER has been in my library since it was first reprinted by the NMRA in 2001. It was my first exposure to this type of data and captured my interest.

A very handy table can be found on pages 1012-1016; Recapitulation of Cars - Freight. This is a data breakdown of box car (X), ventilator cars (V) and stock car (S) quantities across a few different lengths. It is an easy to use table to find ventilated and automobile car quantities. Oddly, grand totals for each of the car classes are not compiled, but it's easy to add up the ventilated car amounts and compare with quantities for specific railroads. I wish I could find a similar table for mid-1920s data.

After quick work with the calculator, the ventilated car quantities total 13,637 cars. In the big picture, that is not a great number. There were more PRR X29 class box cars in service in 1943 than ventilated box cars. But you notice those X29s, don't you? I think our freight car-trained eyes would notice a ventilated car with a slatted second side door and/or small end vents, too. Here are the lines with ventilated cars listed in order of car quantities

 

Central of Georgia - 3647 cars; 2731 of these have an IL 40-foot or greater

Atlantic Coast Line - 3244 cars; 494 of these have an IL 40-foot or greater

Seaboard Air Line - 3046 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Louisville & Nashville - 2096 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Norfolk & Western - 612 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Chesapeake & Ohio - 595 cars; 100 of these have an IL 40-foot or greater

Southern - 357 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Delaware & Hudson - 20 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Southern Pacific - Lines in TX & LA - 12 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast - 8 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

 

Post-War, these numbers began to fall off as the cars were older and the war service was hard on the aging fleet. A combination of increased truck competition, better reefer utilization, and the K-brake ban of 1953 cause the ventilated cars to rapidly disappear from the national freight car fleet over the next 20 years.

As an aside, the 50-foot or greater inside length box cars totaled 47,224, about 3.5 times more than the 1943 ventilated car total.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 



1943 Ventilated car quantities

Eric Hansmann
 

A copy of the January 1943 ORER has been in my library since it was first reprinted by the NMRA in 2001. It was my first exposure to this type of data and captured my interest.

A very handy table can be found on pages 1012-1016; Recapitulation of Cars - Freight. This is a data breakdown of box car (X), ventilator cars (V) and stock car (S) quantities across a few different lengths. It is an easy to use table to find ventilated and automobile car quantities. Oddly, grand totals for each of the car classes are not compiled, but it's easy to add up the ventilated car amounts and compare with quantities for specific railroads. I wish I could find a similar table for mid-1920s data.

After quick work with the calculator, the ventilated car quantities total 13,637 cars. In the big picture, that is not a great number. There were more PRR X29 class box cars in service in 1943 than ventilated box cars. But you notice those X29s, don't you? I think our freight car-trained eyes would notice a ventilated car with a slatted second side door and/or small end vents, too. Here are the lines with ventilated cars listed in order of car quantities

 

Central of Georgia - 3647 cars; 2731 of these have an IL 40-foot or greater

Atlantic Coast Line - 3244 cars; 494 of these have an IL 40-foot or greater

Seaboard Air Line - 3046 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Louisville & Nashville - 2096 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Norfolk & Western - 612 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Chesapeake & Ohio - 595 cars; 100 of these have an IL 40-foot or greater

Southern - 357 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Delaware & Hudson - 20 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Southern Pacific - Lines in TX & LA - 12 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

Atlanta, Birmingham & Coast - 8 cars; none with an IL 40-foot or greater

 

Post-War, these numbers began to fall off as the cars were older and the war service was hard on the aging fleet. A combination of increased truck competition, better reefer utilization, and the K-brake ban of 1953 cause the ventilated cars to rapidly disappear from the national freight car fleet over the next 20 years.

As an aside, the 50-foot or greater inside length box cars totaled 47,224, about 3.5 times more than the 1943 ventilated car total.

 

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX

 


More Steamtown NHS Images - DL&W 35059

Richard Brennan
 

The ErieLack list returns to the freight car topic...
part of the NPS Steamtown collection posted by Historian/Archivist Pat (Richard) McKnight;

A full walk-around of DL&W 35059... a Class B-7 boxcar built 9-1903., taken circa-1921.
Even with a number of replacement sheathing boards, including some that obliterated the left side of the herald;
the ends still show bulging from shifted loads inside.

--------------------
Richard Brennan - San Leandro CA
--------------------

At 02:43 AM 5/12/2017, McKnight, Richard wrote:
<snip>

http://lists.railfan.net/listthumb.cgi?erielack-05-12-17

X1773--Dover, NJ--Boxcar no. 35059--3/4 view [1921.xx.xx]
http://lists.railfan.net/lists/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-05-12-17/X1773.jpg
X1774--Dover, NJ--Boxcar no. 35059--3/4 view [1921.xx.xx]
http://lists.railfan.net/lists/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-05-12-17/X1774.jpg
X1775--Dover, NJ--Boxcar no. 35059--End [1921.xx.xx]
http://lists.railfan.net/lists/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-05-12-17/X1775.jpg
X1776--Dover, NJ--Boxcar no. 35059--End--Closeup of coupler [1921.xx.xx]
http://lists.railfan.net/lists/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-05-12-17/X1776.jpg
X1777--Dover, NJ--Boxcar no. 35059--End- [1921.xx.xx]
http://lists.railfan.net/lists/erielackphoto.cgi?erielack-05-12-17/X1777.jpg


Re: Stripping an Accurail boxcar

David Jobe, Sr.
 

Jeff,

 

It’s a 4600 series USRA double-sheathed box car.  Hopefully, I’ll be able to try the Scalecoat this weekend or perhaps ELO.  Since this is for a kitbash I would prefer to return it to its unpainted state if possible.  Thanks much for the offer.  Hope to see you at the St. Louis RPM!

 

David Jobe, Sr.

Saint Ann, Missouri

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, May 09, 2017 12:39 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Stripping an Accurail boxcar

 




David,

Which series box car is it? I have several undecs in my unbuilt kits stash.  I would trade you an undec for your car if I have the right one.

Jeff White

Alma, IL

 

On 5/8/2017 9:41 PM, 'David Jobe, Sr.' tangerine_flyer@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Unfortunately, 91% Isopropyl alcohol barely touches the paint.  It did get most of the lettering though.

 

David Jobe, Sr.

Saint Ann, Missouri

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Monday, May 08, 2017 7:37 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Stripping an Accurail boxcar

 





Have you tried 91% Isopropyl alcohol?

Eric Hansmann

El Paso, TX


On May 8, 2017, at 6:30 PM, 'David North' david.north@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hi Andrew,

Because the undec version of this series is out of stock at all our suppliers.

Cheers

Dave










Re: Essential Freight Cars - X29

David Jobe, Sr.
 

Sent off list.  About 8 MB total.

 

Best regards,

 

David Jobe, Sr.

Saint Ann, MIssouri

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 11, 2017 11:08 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Essential Freight Cars - X29

 




I am modeling an undecorated Red Caboose X29 and am seeking scans of Ted Culotta's January and February 2007 RMC Essential Freight Car articles on the Pennsy X29 class.  I do not necessarily need hard copies, as PDFs of the original articles would do nicely if anyone has copies.

 

Many thanks in advance.

 

Cheers!

Michael Gross

Pasadena, CA





Re: Ventilated Box Cars

richard glueck
 

Kind of like displaying Grandma in her casket, in the parlor, in July.




On Friday, May 12, 2017 2:50 AM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Yep, field heat is a familiar concept in produce shipping. It combines thermal heat from warm air, etc. with the biological heat from life processes that continue in most fruits and vegetables after harvest. Per-cooling by the shippers is the best remedy.
Tony Thompson 


On May 12, 2017, at 7:59 AM, 'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 
Ike,
 
                The first phrase that came to mind as I read your message was “field heat”.  The crops coming in from the fields were warm.  Were they cooled before being loaded in to ventilated box cars?  I have no idea.
 
                I learned the term “field heat” from Tony Thompson (or I read it in Pacific Fruit Express by Thompson, Church, and Jones).  I hope he’ll chime in and comment.
 
Regards,
 
-Jeff
 
 
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 11, 2017 8:49 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Ventilated Box Cars
 
 
There is another aspect of “ventilated” box cars I did not realize until I started doing research for the SRHA Wood and Steel Underframe Cars book. Ventilated cars were necessary to let heat OUT.

Any vegetable matter produces heat as it decomposes. Melons, etc that were shipped in vent box cars produced enough heat from that process to cause them to “go bad”. It’s not the loads needed cooling or refrigeration, they needed to keep from spoiling due to the heat they produce in transit. There is probably an expert on the list that can explain the process better?

Ike



Re: Permanent Heaters—was Ventilated B ox Cars

Bill Welch
 

I know that Tony, I was responding to Tim's statement.

Bill Welch


Ventilated Boxcar In 1959

Bob Chaparro
 

Caption: "Louisville and Nashville Railroad local freight train crosses Cumberland River as it leaves Clarksville, Tennessee, on run to Paris in September 1959. Photograph by J. Parker Lamb, © 2016, Center for Railroad Photography and Art. Lamb-01-149-01"

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/27670361634/in/album-72157668145827254/

 

Third car is an ACL ventilated boxcar.

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Ventilated Box Cars

Tony Thompson
 

Yep, field heat is a familiar concept in produce shipping. It combines thermal heat from warm air, etc. with the biological heat from life processes that continue in most fruits and vegetables after harvest. Per-cooling by the shippers is the best remedy.
Tony Thompson 


On May 12, 2017, at 7:59 AM, 'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Ike,

 

                The first phrase that came to mind as I read your message was “field heat”.  The crops coming in from the fields were warm.  Were they cooled before being loaded in to ventilated box cars?  I have no idea.

 

                I learned the term “field heat” from Tony Thompson (or I read it in Pacific Fruit Express by Thompson, Church, and Jones).  I hope he’ll chime in and comment.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 11, 2017 8:49 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Ventilated Box Cars

 

 

There is another aspect of “ventilated” box cars I did not realize until I started doing research for the SRHA Wood and Steel Underframe Cars book. Ventilated cars were necessary to let heat OUT.

Any vegetable matter produces heat as it decomposes. Melons, etc that were shipped in vent box cars produced enough heat from that process to cause them to “go bad”. It’s not the loads needed cooling or refrigeration, they needed to keep from spoiling due to the heat they produce in transit. There is probably an expert on the list that can explain the process better?

Ike


Re: Permanent Heaters—was Ventilated Box Cars

Tony Thompson
 

Bill, I was talking about BAR.

Tony Thompson 


On May 12, 2017, at 10:50 AM, fgexbill@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

A'hem, pretty broad statement regarding pre-1960. FGE's Plywood sheathed FOBX 50-foot 4000 overhead bunker cars built beginning in 1944 were equipped with heaters under the floor and while granted it was a singular entity, Aluminum car FGEX 40000 was rebuilt with a permanent underslung heater. 


Then there all those pesky Canadian reefers so equipped.

Bill Welch


Re: Ventilated Box Cars

Tony Thompson
 

After 1960? Off in the dim future somewhere? C'mon, Tim.

Tony Thompson 


On May 12, 2017, at 8:29 AM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Tony

After 1960, a minority of the reefers had either interior alcohol heaters,
or charcoal heaters mounted underneath, like the XI cars. Some of these were
equipped for bulk potato loading. However, prior to 1960 none of the reefers
had permanent heaters of any kind as you say.

Tim O'



The cars with heaters were NOT reefers, but were XI cars. The BAR reefers did NOT have permanent heaters. That's my understanding. Please correct if you have more info.

Tony Thompson


Essential Freight Cars - X29

Michael Gross
 

I am modeling an undecorated Red Caboose X29 and am seeking scans of Ted Culotta's January and February 2007 RMC Essential Freight Car articles on the Pennsy X29 class.  I do not necessarily need hard copies, as PDFs of the original articles would do nicely if anyone has copies.


Many thanks in advance.


Cheers!

Michael Gross

Pasadena, CA


Re: CO-2

Craig Wilson
 

I ran this by John Young, a friend who recently retired from a career at the Pepsi bottling plant in Howell, Michigan:

In the early 1950's, CO2 would probably been delivered in larger (200 gallon range) tanks and transported into the plant. These would have been delivered in box cars. The empties would also have been returned in boxcars. Remember, the bottling plants of that era were much smaller than those of today. If choosing to model a plant that has the kind of production that would require an out door storage tank, he could use a model of a horizontal LP tank, shortened a bit (you need the round ends because of the high pressure) or a vertical tank of the same design. We had one of each tank in Howell. The vertical one you are familiar with had a 50 ton capacity; the horizontal one on the other side of the plant had a 26 ton capacity. Unfortunately, I never had a reason to convert those figures to gallons or cubic feet capacity, so I don't really know how large they actually were. My guess would be that the larger one is in the 15000 gallon range, comparing them to the syrup tanks inside.

The unload method involves a two hose hook up: one hose delivers the liquid CO2 to the storage tank, the second hose returns CO2 vapor to the delivery vessel from the onsite storage tank. It both captures the gas and also balances the pressure between the two tanks making it easier to deliver.

It takes a pump to move liquid CO2, so the unload spot for the CO2 rail car will need some type of pump house. At our site, because the CO2 was delivered by truck, the trucks had a PTO driven pump under the middle of the tank.

In any case, there will be an on site storage tank. No bottling plant would have paid to use a rail car as a storage tank for CO2, CO2 is just too cheap, and the per diem rate too high to hold the tank car for a week to unload it. 

The Howell plant made over 150,000 cases of pop a day and used one truck load of CO2 per day. When I entered the business in 1978, we used about a truck load a week, and we were a big operation at the time turning out about 35,000 cases a day.

One other thing to mention is to have the CO2 source be in the London, Ontario area. That has been a long time source of CO2 over many decades. There have been other sources pop up in the intervening years (such as Lima, Ohio) but even in the 1950's it would have been cheaper to ship CO2 by truck to the modeled town than to ship it by rail from Ohio.
-----------------
Hopefully this answers some questions.  Craig Wilson


Re: Ventilated Box Cars

np328
 

   I had presented last year at both Chicagoland and Cocoa and this spring at a Twin Cities RPM about National Reefer Movements. (Do I have too many Reefers?)

In it I had presented that there was a Special Car Order 95 placed in May 1956, which read in part as follows,

     Because of the impending heavy movement, principally watermelons - SCO 95 became effective May 15. Order is applicable to ventilated (VM) boxcars owned by the ACL, SAL, and C&WC.” (Charleston &Western Carolina)  Prompt unloading and expedited return to loading areas is requested.  

          

   This SCO 95 continued that year until the July 20th AAR bulletin stated : SCO 95 applicable to ventilated boxcars is now cancelled

 I had also provided the quote from the May 21, 1956 AAR bulletin that " The heaviest demands for refrigerator cars normally shifts from the Northern-Belt states to the Southeastern, Gulf, and Southwestern states during April and May". 

Read: Protected Service, which in itself is a major market of refrigerator cars and really a bonus for prototype oriented modelers who understand how it affects refrigerator car usage. 
                                                                                        

     It also lead me to believe (based on the number of SCO's and mentions for Canadian Cars to be returned home) that US modeler seriously undermodel the number of Canadian boxcars on US rails. However that is another topic.                                                                            Jim Dick - St. Paul, MN 

    


---In STMFC@..., <jimbetz@...> wrote :

Hi,

  What was shipped in "Ventilated Box Cars" - the ones with open/slotted doors and

ventilators on the ends of the cars?  

  Most of the pics of them I've seen have been pre-WWII ... when did they stop

being used?  What replaced them?

                                                                                                          - Jim


Re: THINNER FOR FLOQUIL SOLVENT BASED PAINTS

anthony wagner
 

For what it's worth, I used lacquer thinner with both Floquil and Scalecoat before I switched to acrylics. It worked better with Floquil and saved some cash over buying brand specific thinners. A quart can would last a long time. Tony Wagner


On Thursday, May 11, 2017 3:31 PM, "Rod Miller rod@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
On 5/11/17 1:09 PM, Nelson Moyer npmoyer@... [STMFC] wrote:
> You’re rumor is urban legend. If you read the fine print on the can, you will
> see that the ingredients include a number of organic solvents that are
> immiscible with water. If you wish to experiment, put a little water in a
> small jar and add a little lacquer thinner. Your will see water on the bottom
> layer and lacquer thinner on top. If you shake the jar and let it stand, the
> solvents will separate into two layers. I don’t have my CRC handbook any
> more, but you look up the solubility tables if you have one available.
>
> Nelson Moyer
>
> From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] Sent: Thursday,
> May 11, 2017 2:34 PM To: STMFC@... Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re:
> THINNER FOR FLOQUIL SOLVENT BASED PAINTS
>
>
>
> It is rumored that the big box lacquer thinners are cut with water.
>
> For painting I buy lacquer thinner from auto paint supply stores. For clean
> up I use the big box thinner.
>
> -- Rod Miller

Good info, thanks.

--
Rod Miller
Handcraftsman
===
Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2017 Meet is May 25 - 27
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com



Re: Permanent Heaters—was Ventilated Box Cars

Bill Welch
 

A'hem, pretty broad statement regarding pre-1960. FGE's Plywood sheathed FOBX 50-foot 4000 overhead bunker cars built beginning in 1944 were equipped with heaters under the floor and while granted it was a singular entity, Aluminum car FGEX 40000 was rebuilt with a permanent underslung heater. 

Then there all those pesky Canadian reefers so equipped.

Bill Welch

31561 - 31580 of 181094