Date   

Re: Tichy USRA steel rebuilds

Benjamin Hom
 

Jared Harper asked:
"I am trying to figure out what prototypes the Tichy USRA steel rebuilds can be used to model. I assume someone out there can help me. Thanks."

Did you search the group archives? This is certainly not the first time this model was discussed, and I wrote up some detailed answers to this question.

Quick answer - out of the box, this models rebuilds of USRA SS boxcars done by PMcK&Y, later P&LE. With new ends, it can be used to model Wabash rebuilds, and Sunshine sold a mini-kit for the conversion.


Ben Hom


Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Tony Thompson
 

I just know that PFE was very thorough in car upkeep.
Tony Thompson 


On May 15, 2017, at 11:52 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

Interesting, Bob. I’d speculate that the dark area around the ribs is condensation. The ribs are exposed to the cold inside the reefer, and are comparatively cool on the exterior...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/25558915051/sizes/k/
======================

Interesting speculation, Schuyler, but one problem... Since the SRECo panel roofs don't use carlines, there is nothing under the "rib" that penetrates any deeper into the insulation than the rest of the roof, therefore no reason for the ribs to be colder. The carline structure is replaced in these roofs by the combination of the upstanding flange on each edge of the roof panel, riveted to the U shaped pressed steel seam cap. Because of the rivet penetrations on the sides of the seam caps, some roads specified car cement on the seam caps to try to head off any leaks. To me the photo appears to show an additional application of fresh car cement on an older roof. 

Perhaps Tony can comment on PFE's roof maintenance practices.

Dennis Storzek
 


Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Rufus Cone
 

Looks like PFE 65327

Rufus Cone
Bozeman, MT
On 5/15/2017 2:22 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] wrote:

�


My only question is - is the reefer an R-30-21, or an R-40-21 ?

Tim O'Connor


Ventilated Boxcar In Rhode Island

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Another photo from the Center for Railroad Photography & Art:

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/25238796516/sizes/k/

 

Use the slider on the bottom of the photo to see the right side of the photo.

 

Caption: "New York, New Haven and Hartford Budd Rail Diesel car heading down main line with caboose no. C-520 adjacent, in Providence, Rhode Island some time between 1950 and 1955. Photograph by Leo King, © 2016, Center for Railroad Photography and Art. King-01-031-002"

 

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Tichy USRA steel rebuilds

Jared Harper
 

I am trying to figure out what prototypes the Tichy USRA steel rebuilds can be used to model.  I assume someone out there can help me.  Thanks.


Jared Harper



Resinators Unite on June 22 at Collinsville RPM

Bill Welch
 

People that enjoy building Resin Kits or are curious about doing so are invited to gather at 11AM, Saturday June 24 during the Collinsville RPM. Meeting place will be identified nearer to the date.


I suggest two ways to focus our time and energy. First if the there is prototype you think deserves to be done as a model, please bring all the information you can muster to share with the group and use the group as a "Sounding Board" for your idea and whatever obstacles you are having or envision. This could include pattern making. Perhaps we can help you bring your idea to fruition.


Secondly we can discuss whatever issues you have in building these kits to help you be successful. This can include tools, adhesives, and anything else that is frustrating you.


Please tell your friends and bring them along.


See you there!

Bill Welch



Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

The caption on the picture says that the train has just exited a tunnel ...
perhaps the stuff we are seeing and calling moisture is simply smoke/soot
that has collected but not blown off to a more normal amount and
location?
- Jim B.


Re: Emery Boards (was Pan Pastels)

Charles Peck
 

Soft materials such as brass, solder, and plastic do indeed clog files.  Before filing soft material,
I fill the file with chalk, regular blackboard chalk.  The chalk will allow the file to work but
will make it much easier to clean afterwards.
Chuck Peck

On Mon, May 15, 2017 at 1:11 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


I use a brass "bristle" brush and it cleans the files just fine. I guess if one got really
gunked up I'd take it outside for a grit blast. But I also use emery boards, and the newer
brands of foam-core files that come in many shapes and levels of abrasion from 60 to 600...

Tim O'Connor



I have used a file card, but it never got all the gunk out and eventually the files were ruined. Emery boards are much cheaper than new files. They are also handy for tight spaces, especially for cleaning out narrow slots.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff



Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Tim O'Connor
 


And the train has just emerged from the Hermosa tunnel. Lots of steam in there!
So maybe a tiny layer of condensation combined with film, lighting, shadows, and
scanning effects. Not much to be concluded from all this.

My only question is - is the reefer an R-30-21, or an R-40-21 ?

Tim O'Connor




I believe some of you are seeing are image artifacts. The digitized image appears to have high contrast and the dark lines along the roof ribs are just very dark shadows. Look at the back of the coal bunker it is also completely black as is the rear of the first tender.

Bob Witt
==================

Agree with the hard shadows on the near side of the seam caps, but I thought we were talking about the "puddle" effect surrounding the base of each seam cap.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/25558915051/sizes/k/?ytcheck=2f3420ff0e6b09980c0e67bbdfeb9d66

Dennis Storzek


Re: Emery Boards (was Pan Pastels)

Tim O'Connor
 


I use a brass "bristle" brush and it cleans the files just fine. I guess if one got really
gunked up I'd take it outside for a grit blast. But I also use emery boards, and the newer
brands of foam-core files that come in many shapes and levels of abrasion from 60 to 600...

Tim O'Connor



I have used a file card, but it never got all the gunk out and eventually the files were ruined. Emery boards are much cheaper than new files. They are also handy for tight spaces, especially for cleaning out narrow slots.

Yours Aye,

Garth Groff


Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

SUVCWORR@...
 

Bruce,

Looking at the twin 40's when assembled as a unit ready to be installed on a ship, I am wondering if it wasn;t a center of gravity issue.  With the well the center of gravity would be lowered and avoid rolling the load.  This would be of particular concern on some "sharp" cures.

Rich Orr


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]
To: PRR@yahoogroups. com ; STMFC cataldotj@... [STMFC]
Sent: Mon, May 15, 2017 9:47 am
Subject: [STMFC] PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns



Folks,

Looking over the PRRT&HS flat car book, I was reminded by the text that the F37 flat cars were built during WWII as a consequence of the nearly identical FNA cars being almost complete obligated to the U.S. Navy to ship twin 40 mm anti-aircraft (Bofors) mounts. Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram?  I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."






Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Richard Townsend
 

One idea occurred to me. It looks like the car had been recently reweighed. If there had been repairs might they have included applying some kind of sealant to the seam caps? Perhaps with some fairly substantial overspray?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: destorzek@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, May 15, 2017 11:47 am
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

 



---In STMFC@..., wrote :

I believe some of you are seeing are image artifacts. The digitized image appears to have high contrast and the dark lines along the roof ribs are just very dark shadows. Look at the back of the coal bunker it is also completely black as is the rear of the first tender.

Bob Witt
==================
Agree with the hard shadows on the near side of the seam caps, but I thought we were talking about the "puddle" effect surrounding the base of each seam cap.


Dennis Storzek


Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <rwitt_2000@...> wrote :

I believe some of you are seeing are image artifacts. The digitized image appears to have high contrast and the dark lines along the roof ribs are just very dark shadows. Look at the back of the coal bunker it is also completely black as is the rear of the first tender.

Bob Witt
==================
Agree with the hard shadows on the near side of the seam caps, but I thought we were talking about the "puddle" effect surrounding the base of each seam cap.


Dennis Storzek


Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

rwitt_2000
 

I believe some of you are seeing are image artifacts. The digitized image appears to have high contrast and the dark lines along the roof ribs are just very dark shadows. Look at the back of the coal bunker it is also completely black as is the rear of the first tender.

Bob Witt


Re: Don't be chicken

Louie B. Hydrick
 

Greetings,
 
In the time we are addressing, labor was comparatively inexpensive, and hand loading/unloading of many commodities was common. Logistics of returning empty coops made the use of separate coops financially unfeasible if not impractical.
 
I have a rather extensive treatise from the Charleston & Western Carolina Railroad about the difficulty of getting shippers to use consistent produce baskets to maximize the use of space in various reefers and produce (aka watermelon) cars.  Produce remains still during shipment, and does not need a lid, so the baskets could "nest".  Not so with poultry.
 
A 24" passageway would be snug, but not impractical for the average person in that time frame.  We as a nation have definitely gotten fatter; however, there are still homes built today with one or more 24" doors, mostly to closets. 
 
I imagine that hand loading chickens would be like most other manual labor on the farm, experience would breed expertise.
 
Louie B. Hydrick
Associate Broker
RE/MAX Partners
4316 Washington Road
Evans GA 30809-3957

706-832-6263 Mobile
706-922-7355 Office
706-922-7356 Fax
706-922-7368 Direct

GA Lic. 207874 SC Lic. 14865

Or visit me on the web at:
www.csrahomesandland.com
or
www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Dennis;

I was not able to find either during the research for the book, but it is possible there is info in the PRRT&HS archives, somewhere. I wished I had found a photo. I am sure Bruce is right, and that the well was needed to accommodate the width of the platform on its side.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, May 15, 2017 10:37 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [STMFC] Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns







---In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, <smithbf@...> wrote :

Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram? I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.
================
Not quite what you are looking for, just general info on the application, but given the illustration of the rotating deck with NINE men standing on it, I suspect they were wider than 10' and needed to be shipped on edge.

Blockedhttp://hamptonroadsnavalmuseum.blogspot.com/2014/09/the-40mm-bofors-gun.html


Dennis Storzek


Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

Bruce Smith
 

Dennis,

Not to get too technical but that’s a “quad 40”, which is basically two twin 40s.  The text in the flat car book indicates “twin 40’s” and these did exist as independent mounts, but if it is the quad mount, shipping on edge with the platform in the well would definitely make a lot of sense!

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On May 15, 2017, at 9:37 AM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :
Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram?  I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.
================
Not quite what you are looking for, just general info on the application, but given the illustration of the rotating deck with NINE men standing on it, I suspect they were wider than 10' and needed to be shipped on edge.


Dennis Storzek




Re: Weathered Roof - PFE Reefer

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote :

Interesting, Bob. I’d speculate that the dark area around the ribs is condensation. The ribs are exposed to the cold inside the reefer, and are comparatively cool on the exterior...

https://www.flickr.com/photos/railphotoart/25558915051/sizes/k/
======================

Interesting speculation, Schuyler, but one problem... Since the SRECo panel roofs don't use carlines, there is nothing under the "rib" that penetrates any deeper into the insulation than the rest of the roof, therefore no reason for the ribs to be colder. The carline structure is replaced in these roofs by the combination of the upstanding flange on each edge of the roof panel, riveted to the U shaped pressed steel seam cap. Because of the rivet penetrations on the sides of the seam caps, some roads specified car cement on the seam caps to try to head off any leaks. To me the photo appears to show an additional application of fresh car cement on an older roof. 

Perhaps Tony can comment on PFE's roof maintenance practices.

Dennis Storzek
 


Re: PRR FNA flat cars and twin 40 mm AA guns

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :
Does anyone have any additional information on these loads, such as photos or a loading diagram?  I have looked at the mounts and wonder why a well flat would be needed since they do not seem to be particularly tall.
================
Not quite what you are looking for, just general info on the application, but given the illustration of the rotating deck with NINE men standing on it, I suspect they were wider than 10' and needed to be shipped on edge.


Dennis Storzek


Semet-Solvay HO scale tank car build

Eric Hansmann
 

Jim Kubanick shares tips and techniques to build a Yarmouth Model Works tank car kit. Check out Jim’s work building a neat model of an AC&F Type 27 prototype on the Resin Car Works blog.

 

http://blog.resincarworks.com/semet-solvay-type-27-10k-gallon-tank-car/

 

 

 

Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy

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