Date   

Re: ice refrigerator car

Patrick Wade
 

An interesting note on ATSF usage. I read several works on the Harvey House operation. These company cars also delivered parshiables to the Harvey House kitchens. And when they got to the end of the line, on the trip back they hauled dirty dining room linen back to a central laundry facility.

Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Sun, Oct 11, 2020 at 11:39 AM Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:
  I've recently completed a Westerfield kit, no. 10864, for a Santa Fe ice car conversion. A photo of the model is below. I have also written a summary of ice car operations, as they apply on my layout, as well as an explanation of the presence of a Santa Fe car like this on an SP layout. If you're interested, the link is below.


Tony Thompson
tony@...



Re: ice refrigerator car

James Brewer
 

Beautiful model and interesting blog write-up!

Jim Brewer


Re: ice refrigerator car

Gary Ray
 

Very interesting.  Thank you for sharing.

Gary Ray

Magalia, CA

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tony Thompson
Sent: Sunday, October 11, 2020 11:39 AM
To: ResinFreightCarBuilders@groups.io; RealSTMFC@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] ice refrigerator car

 

  I've recently completed a Westerfield kit, no. 10864, for a Santa Fe ice car conversion. A photo of the model is below. I have also written a summary of ice car operations, as they apply on my layout, as well as an explanation of the presence of a Santa Fe car like this on an SP layout. If you're interested, the link is below.

 

 

Tony Thompson
tony@...


Virus-free. www.avast.com


Re: ice refrigerator car

BRIAN PAUL EHNI
 

Surprised the coupler box extends that far on a truss rod car.

 

 

Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni

 

 

From: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> on behalf of Tony Thompson <tony@...>
Reply-To: <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Date: Sunday, October 11, 2020 at 1:38 PM
To: <ResinFreightCarBuilders@groups.io>, <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] ice refrigerator car

 

  I've recently completed a Westerfield kit, no. 10864, for a Santa Fe ice car conversion. A photo of the model is below. I have also written a summary of ice car operations, as they apply on my layout, as well as an explanation of the presence of a Santa Fe car like this on an SP layout. If you're interested, the link is below.

 

 

Tony Thompson
tony@...


ice refrigerator car

Tony Thompson
 

  I've recently completed a Westerfield kit, no. 10864, for a Santa Fe ice car conversion. A photo of the model is below. I have also written a summary of ice car operations, as they apply on my layout, as well as an explanation of the presence of a Santa Fe car like this on an SP layout. If you're interested, the link is below.


Tony Thompson
tony@...



Re: Photo: UTLX 69755 Loading Hot Rosin (Circa 1960)

erieblt2
 

Sorry for an aside. For some unknown reason this picture Sparked an old memory. In the early 60’s I saw the result of a derailed overturned split open covered hopper at Parkville Junction on the Long Island Rail Road’s Bay Ridge Branch. The hopper was carrying tiny blue plastic beads to be made into...(?) ‘stuff’. It was everywherE! The mild wind blew the little spheres all around. I still have an empty 35mm film canister filled with the little pellets! I still wonder how they cleaned it up! It was inshovelable(?‘could not be shoveled’). Cleaning up wrecked reefer contents must also been tough! Celery !?! And spilled resin!!!!! Yikes! Bill S


On Oct 11, 2020, at 10:45 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:



Photo: UTLX 69755 Loading Hot Rosin (Circa 1960)

A photo from the Science History Institute:

https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/bk128b85n

Click and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Caption:

General view of the tank car loading station used to transport hot rosin at the Hercules Powder Company plant in Brunswick, Georgia. One of two Hercules plants specializing in naval stores, the Brunswick plant extracted rosin, turpentine, and pine oil from pine tree stumps in order to produce a range of chemicals used in the manufacture of varnishes, paints, adhesives, insecticides, textiles, and other industrial products. The employee visible adjusting the loading pipe on top of the tank car is identified as Clifford Martin.

Formed in 1912 as part of an anti-trust settlement with DuPont, the Hercules Powder Company (later Hercules Inc.) initially specialized in the manufacture of explosives and smokeless powders and subsequently diversified its business to encompass a variety of industrial products, including pine and paper chemicals, synthetics, pigments, polymers, and cellulose.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: UTLX 69755 Loading Hot Rosin (Circa 1960)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: UTLX 69755 Loading Hot Rosin (Circa 1960)

A photo from the Science History Institute:

https://digital.sciencehistory.org/works/bk128b85n

Click and scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

Caption:

General view of the tank car loading station used to transport hot rosin at the Hercules Powder Company plant in Brunswick, Georgia. One of two Hercules plants specializing in naval stores, the Brunswick plant extracted rosin, turpentine, and pine oil from pine tree stumps in order to produce a range of chemicals used in the manufacture of varnishes, paints, adhesives, insecticides, textiles, and other industrial products. The employee visible adjusting the loading pipe on top of the tank car is identified as Clifford Martin.

Formed in 1912 as part of an anti-trust settlement with DuPont, the Hercules Powder Company (later Hercules Inc.) initially specialized in the manufacture of explosives and smokeless powders and subsequently diversified its business to encompass a variety of industrial products, including pine and paper chemicals, synthetics, pigments, polymers, and cellulose.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: ATSF Boxcar 19993 Bx-11 (1959)

Kenneth Montero
 

Bob,

Thank you for putting together this collage of photographs to show the changes to this car over time, especially the application of exterior steel sheeting in the 1950's. It has been quite enlightening.

Ken Montero

On 10/11/2020 1:08 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:


Photo: ATSF Boxcar 19993 Bx-11 (1959)

A photo from the SMU Libraries:

https://digitalcollections.smu.edu/digital/collection/rwy/id/1242/rec/6

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

From the date and paint scheme, the car recently was painted.

This Class Bx-11 was on of 2,000 boxcars (Series 19000-20550) built in 1929 as single wood sheathed cars. These were the first Santa Fe boxcars to be delivered with geared handbrake wheels.

Westerfield model:

https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/popup_image.php?pID=307

This car was rebuilt in the early 1940s with steel side and end extensions. Here is an example:

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-tv9q7h9wR_I/Xf5jrI642WI/AAAAAAAAoLI/nIcuXpGuiG4sS1YQ39O8iWaQDFSDhw9VQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/ATSF%2BBx-11%2B124518%2Bwith%2B8-inch%2Broof%2Bextension%2Bin%2BNew%2BBritain.jpg

One note I have indicates the full steel sheathing, as seen in the SMU photo, was applied in 1956. There were still 261 cars in this series rostered in 1974 but none by 1977.

There were four other series of Bx-11 cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Video: Erie Railroad Carfloat Operations in Chicago, 1920

Bill J.
 

Side rod diesels in the 1920s?!

This is a precious piece of film.

Bill Jolitz


Photo: ATSF Boxcar 19993 Bx-11 (1959)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: ATSF Boxcar 19993 Bx-11 (1959)

A photo from the SMU Libraries:

https://digitalcollections.smu.edu/digital/collection/rwy/id/1242/rec/6

Scroll on the photo to enlarge it.

From the date and paint scheme, the car recently was painted.

This Class Bx-11 was on of 2,000 boxcars (Series 19000-20550) built in 1929 as single wood sheathed cars. These were the first Santa Fe boxcars to be delivered with geared handbrake wheels.

Westerfield model:

https://id18538.securedata.net/westerfieldmodels.com/merchantmanager/popup_image.php?pID=307

This car was rebuilt in the early 1940s with steel side and end extensions. Here is an example:

https://1.bp.blogspot.com/-tv9q7h9wR_I/Xf5jrI642WI/AAAAAAAAoLI/nIcuXpGuiG4sS1YQ39O8iWaQDFSDhw9VQCLcBGAsYHQ/s1600/ATSF%2BBx-11%2B124518%2Bwith%2B8-inch%2Broof%2Bextension%2Bin%2BNew%2BBritain.jpg

One note I have indicates the full steel sheathing, as seen in the SMU photo, was applied in 1956. There were still 261 cars in this series rostered in 1974 but none by 1977.

There were four other series of Bx-11 cars.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photos: Magor Car ASX 6758 (Undated)

Eric Hansmann
 

That looks like a modern coke gondola. There isn’t a roof but there is a running board.

 

Note the GC stencil in the lower right corner. It also seems to have a Nuevo stencil of 48.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Bob Chaparro via groups.io
Sent: Saturday, October 10, 2020 12:13 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photos: Magor Car ASX 6758 (Undated)

 

Photos: Magor Car ASX 6758 (Undated)

Photos from the SMU Libraries:

https://digitalcollections.smu.edu/digital/collection/rwy/id/3236/rec/57

https://digitalcollections.smu.edu/digital/collection/rwy/id/3256/rec/32

Scroll on the photos to enlarge them.

American Smelting & Refining Co. car with open top.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

Dennis Storzek
 

On Sun, Oct 11, 2020 at 08:17 AM, George Eichelberger wrote:
Looking at various ads in different "Car Builder’s Cyclopedias”, “drop brake shafts” work in either the upper or lower position (their shaft is square) or rotated to the vertical or horizontal positions. Unless those functions were outlawed at some point, they could be arranged to clear loads wsith no problem.
Seems to me that unless the drop staff has a detent to hold the wheel 4" above the deck, they violate the requirement for hand clearance when in the down position. Can't comment on the swinging variety, but they didn't seem to be very popular after the twenties, so must not have offered any advantage. Seems to me we went through this discussion not too long ago, in a thread about brake staffs on early piggyback flats, and Guy Wilber provided the definitive answer, but I don't have time to search for it.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

George Eichelberger
 

Looking at various ads in different "Car Builder’s Cyclopedias”, “drop brake shafts” work in either the upper or lower position (their shaft is square) or rotated to the vertical or horizontal positions. Unless those functions were outlawed at some point, they could be arranged to clear loads wsith no problem.

Ike


Re: Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

Nelson Moyer
 

Thanks for your definitive answer, Dennis. You just laid this thread to rest.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dennis Storzek
Sent: Saturday, October 10, 2020 10:34 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

 

On Wed, Oct 7, 2020 at 05:52 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

All of my loads so far would not interfere with or threaten the brake staffs, so I guess modeling the staff raised is acceptable. If I do a pole or lumber load, I’ll model the staff in the lowered position, assuming the prototype car had a drop-down hand brake.

Coming into this late. I would postulate that any car with a hand brake not in the position specified in the ICC safety appliance diagrams has a defect and won't move past the first inbound inspection without having it remedied. Now, the remedy may be as simple as the car men raising it to operating position, but it will be raised. If it can't be raised the shipper has a problem, because the railroad is going to charge him for shifting the load. All cars are required to have an operable hand brake, the only exception is idlers where the brake staff would interfere with the load, and those cars are required to be permanently coupled to a car with an operable hand brake. Permanently coupled in this case means either chained together or the uncoupling mechanisms made inoperative.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Retractable Brake Staffs on Flat Cars - An Operational Question

Dennis Storzek
 

On Wed, Oct 7, 2020 at 05:52 PM, Nelson Moyer wrote:
All of my loads so far would not interfere with or threaten the brake staffs, so I guess modeling the staff raised is acceptable. If I do a pole or lumber load, I’ll model the staff in the lowered position, assuming the prototype car had a drop-down hand brake.
Coming into this late. I would postulate that any car with a hand brake not in the position specified in the ICC safety appliance diagrams has a defect and won't move past the first inbound inspection without having it remedied. Now, the remedy may be as simple as the car men raising it to operating position, but it will be raised. If it can't be raised the shipper has a problem, because the railroad is going to charge him for shifting the load. All cars are required to have an operable hand brake, the only exception is idlers where the brake staff would interfere with the load, and those cars are required to be permanently coupled to a car with an operable hand brake. Permanently coupled in this case means either chained together or the uncoupling mechanisms made inoperative.

Dennis Storzek


Video: Erie Railroad Carfloat Operations in Chicago, 1920

Bob Chaparro
 

Video: Erie Railroad Carfloat Operations in Chicago, 1920

https://youtu.be/eHCJPMATXrk

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: ADVICE FROM THE ESTEEMED GENTLEMAN OF STMFC...

Mansell Peter Hambly
 

Thank you Steve

 

Mansell

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: StephenK
Sent: October 10, 2020 1:40 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] ADVICE FROM THE ESTEEMED GENTLEMAN OF STMFC...

 

One other tip on the decals.   After the Microscale film has fully dried, cut a piece of the sheet that you do not need to see how bad (or good ) the repaired decal is.  Old decals can still be good (Champ) or can totally disintegrate.   Good Luck!

Steve Kay

 


Re: Storzek & Des Plaines 1916 NYC Auto Box Cars

Dennis Storzek
 

On Fri, Oct 9, 2020 at 06:28 PM, Mark Rossiter wrote:
The LATE Richard Stoving?  I was not aware he passed.  If true, that is sad news indeed!
Well, I certainly have egg on my face. I haven't corresponded with Mr. Stoving since we collaborated on the history for that instruction sheet over thirty years ago, and some how I had in my mind that I had heard of his passing, an error that has been privately pointed out to me. So, I offer this correction and a public apology to Mr. Stoving and his family.

Dennis Storzek


Re: ADVICE FROM THE ESTEEMED GENTLEMAN OF STMFC...

StephenK
 

One other tip on the decals.   After the Microscale film has fully dried, cut a piece of the sheet that you do not need to see how bad (or good ) the repaired decal is.  Old decals can still be good (Champ) or can totally disintegrate.   Good Luck!

Steve Kay


Re: Lever Brake Handles

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Bob,

As my 1989 photo of an RF&P shows, some were still in use way beyond our period of interest.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sat, Oct 10, 2020 at 2:10 PM Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb=verizon.net@groups.io> wrote:

Lever Brake Handles

Were lever brake handles ever banned or outlawed, or did they just fall out of favor?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

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