Date   

Re: Adding weight when no weight

Bill Vaughn
 

I bought two Westerfield Bx-3 that were underweight by quite a bit.  I carefully soaked the side and underframe joint with acetone.  Q tip worked very good.  As it softened the glue I pried open the joint so it would not reglue.  Once inside added stick on weight and reglued.

Just take your time and be careful.

Bill Vaughn


On Thursday, November 2, 2017 1:48 PM, "Srrfan1401 srrfan1401@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Tim’s right check for leaks first. I’ve been driving all day. Sorry and good catch Tim 


On Nov 2, 2017, at 4:37 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

First inject water to find any leaks and plug them with ACC. Repeat until no more leaks.
Shake out the water and allow to dry (evaporate) for a few days.

Mix lead shot with white glue. Inject into the car body with a plastic turkey baster.
Plug hole with blob of gum or stick-um and allow plenty of time for the mixture to set.

Wash baster out immediately afterwards with water, in case this happens again.

Tim O'



3. Drill hole in underframe large enough to pour desired amount of small shot and reseal.  Shot will be loose in carbody unless you want to risk flooding some sort of agent into the car to fix it in place.

Ben Hom



Make Your Own Decals (was Tichy Decals)

Dave Parker
 

All:

Speaking as the guy who printed the MDT decals that Ray Breyer mentioned in his recent post, I thought I would offer a few follow-up observations.

Like many, I used to lament the lack of commercial decals that I needed for a number of projects.  Then I started to look at it pragmatically:  the odds of a commercial outfit offering obscure, pre-1942, Roman-typeface decals for the Central Vermont were functionally nil.  So I started making my own.

At first, the printing (at least of white decals) was the most daunting part, so I did a couple of runs with Rail Graphics.  Great stuff, but there is a 25-set minimum and, as Ray noted, Ron is closing shop at the end of the year.

I have a color LaserJet that set me back all of $189 in 2012; it didn’t owe me anything and I had already made a few black decals with it that looked great.  So, I took the plunge and ordered the white Ghost cartridge from Germany – $147 U.S. to my door, and it arrived very quickly.  As I understand it, these cartridges are simply recycled black toner cartridges that have been refilled with white.  You just swap it into the black slot in the laser, prepare black-on- white artwork, and print.  The printer “thinks” it’s printing black, but it’s not.  Decal paper is readily available (MicroMark, Tango Papa) and its cost is trivial – about a buck for an 8.5 x 11 sheet.

With this setup, I can print black, white, and some limited colors.  Strong reds and blues, such as the stripes on the MDT reefers, are no problem.  As David Bott noted, yellows and golds are a no-go; you will need to go commercial (or ALPS).  I would quibble with one thing Ray said:  with sufficient magnification, I can actually read the 1" lettering, not just the 2", in HO scale (albeit barely).  So the resolution is better than with any screen-printed decals that I have seen thus far.

One nice thing (IMO) about the laser-printed white is that it is NOT very opaque.  It is reminiscent of the lovely pad-printing on the Accurail cars in that it is “pre-faded” a bit.  Moreover, I can enhance that fading by setting the artwork to something like a 75% gray scale so that the printer lays down less of the white toner.  And finally, I have found that you can swap the white and black toner cartridges in and out as often as need be, without any downside.

So, in my view, I am back to where the artwork preparation is the more limiting (or daunting) factor.  Many decal-makers tout the virtues a vector-based graphics program, usually Corel Draw or Adobe Illustrator.  I have Inkscape, a freeware equivalent that seems to do the job, but I don’t actually use it much.  Having owned and used MS Powerpoint for almost three decades, I find that it can do about 95% of the layout that I need, even though it is raster-based (and Inkscape can cover the rest).

That leaves the pesky problem of fonts (or typefaces).  There are a few free True Type fonts out there that are useful, notably the B&O font offered by the historical society.  I also bought a few fonts from Rail Fonts that are useful as is, or can be easily modified with a font editor – these run $10 to 15 each.  There are a bunch of font editors out there but, based on a recommendation, I purchased the home edition of High Logic’s Font Creator that currently sells for $79.  It seems to have more capabilities than I need (or am likely to master), including the ability to trace a digital image of a character that provides another starting point for glyph creation.

My personal view is that getting up to speed on decal creation does not require particularly sharp computer acumen, it just requires patience.  But, much like mastering Sketchup and 3D printing, it opens up a whole vista of new modeling possibilities, especially for small and obscure roads, and for pre-WWII eras.

As always, YMMV.

PS:  I have recouped the cost of the Ghost, and most of the cost of the font editor, by doing a few limited decals runs for friends.  If you go down this path, you will be amazed how many new friends you can acquire!

Dave Parker
Riverside, CA






Re: 40-foot War Emergency Gondola List

Bill Welch
 

Also Southern with drop doors. They were painted black w/white stenciling.

Bill Welch


Re: Adding weight when no weight

O Fenton Wells
 

Tim’s right check for leaks first. I’ve been driving all day. Sorry and good catch Tim 


On Nov 2, 2017, at 4:37 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 


First inject water to find any leaks and plug them with ACC. Repeat until no more leaks.
Shake out the water and allow to dry (evaporate) for a few days.

Mix lead shot with white glue. Inject into the car body with a plastic turkey baster.
Plug hole with blob of gum or stick-um and allow plenty of time for the mixture to set.

Wash baster out immediately afterwards with water, in case this happens again.

Tim O'



3. Drill hole in underframe large enough to pour desired amount of small shot and reseal.  Shot will be loose in carbody unless you want to risk flooding some sort of agent into the car to fix it in place.

Ben Hom


Re: Adding weight when no weight

O Fenton Wells
 

Drill a hole in the bottom pour in B.B. ‘a and white glue plug hole and shake to level load the car. Sit and let dry


On Nov 2, 2017, at 4:06 PM, Denny Anspach danspachmd@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

How do listers non-destructively add needed weight to finished house cars, when no weight was added originally?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Re: Adding weight when no weight

Tim O'Connor
 


First inject water to find any leaks and plug them with ACC. Repeat until no more leaks.
Shake out the water and allow to dry (evaporate) for a few days.

Mix lead shot with white glue. Inject into the car body with a plastic turkey baster.
Plug hole with blob of gum or stick-um and allow plenty of time for the mixture to set.

Wash baster out immediately afterwards with water, in case this happens again.

Tim O'



3. Drill hole in underframe large enough to pour desired amount of small shot and reseal.  Shot will be loose in carbody unless you want to risk flooding some sort of agent into the car to fix it in place.

Ben Hom


Re: Adding weight when no weight

 

I acquired a quantity of 1/16” thick lead sheet from the medical center where I work. You can get it from https://www.mcmaster.com/#lead-sheets/=1a3179s





Thanks!
--

Brian Ehni



From: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> on behalf of STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Reply-To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Date: Thursday, November 2, 2017 at 3:06 PM
To: STMFC List <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [STMFC] Adding weight when no weight





How do listers non-destructively add needed weight to finished house cars, when no weight was added originally?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Adding weight when no weight

Benjamin Hom
 

Denny Anspach asked:
"How do listers non-destructively add needed weight to finished house cars, when no weight was added originally?"

1. Switch out plastic trucks with metal trucks.
2. Conceal weight between center sills and any other hidden areas of underbody using moldable lead, lead wool, or small shot.
3. Drill hole in underframe large enough to pour desired amount of small shot and reseal.  Shot will be loose in carbody unless you want to risk flooding some sort of agent into the car to fix it in place.


Ben Hom


Adding weight when no weight

Denny Anspach <danspachmd@...>
 

How do listers non-destructively add needed weight to finished house cars, when no weight was added originally?

Denny

Denny S. Anspach, MD
Sacramento, CA 95864


Re: 40-foot War Emergency Gondola List

Tim O'Connor
 

John

T&NO (later SP), ACL, Wabash (later KO&G), GM&O, NYC

 G-50-17 TNO series 42450-42649 blt 1944 PRESSED STEEL CAR ( 200)
 G-50-19 TNO series 42650-42849 blt 1946 RALSTON STEEL CAR ( 200)
 G-50-19 TNO series 44100-44599 blt 1948 RALSTON STEEL CAR ( 500)
 G-50-21 TNO series 46300-46999 blt 1949 AC&F              ( 700)
 G-50-24 TNO series 47000-47999 blt 1951 SP EQUIPMENT CO   (1000)
 G-50-24 TNO series 48000-48499 blt 1951 SP EQUIPMENT CO   ( 500)

 ACL series 93600-93899 blt ?? renumbered after rebuilding with steel sides

 WABASH series 13000-13249 blt 1944 WABASH DECATUR SHOPS

 GM&O series 44000-44249 blt ?? (longitudinal drop doors)

 NYC series 643000-644099 blt 1942 DSI lot 719-G (different design than above cars)

Also, PRR built 45'7" foot versions of the above 41'6" foot versions! (e.g. G29B, G29D)

Tim O'Connor



Hope you all had a wonderful time at Naperville!

Can anyone provide please an accurate list of those railroads that acquired 40-foot "war emergency" gondolas.  I am aware that ACL had them, and Southern had a variant.  I don't want to speculate about other roads, so if anyone has a handy list I'd be grateful to have the info.

John Golden


Re: Film about West India Fruit (Impounded Freight Cars)

thecitrusbelt@...
 

Nice film.


Does anyone know how many, if any, freight cars belonging to U.S. railroads were impounded in Cuba after the trade embargo was instituted?


It makes one wonder if any such cars are still around on the island.


Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Tichy decals (was RE: Decal Adhesive)

Ray Breyer
 

Home printed, white decals are a real thing. Ignore Alps, ignore Rail Graphics (which is closing in a month anyway). Go directly here:
I had a couple of sets on display at Lisle (the MDT reefer decals if anyone saw them), and full sets were handed out two weeks ago at the Carolinas RPM meet along with their "build N' Bash" Southern ventilated boxcar. The printers and ink are giving several of us good results down to 2" HO scale lettering.

If you need Duluxe, or anything complex like multi-colored heralds, contact Microscale directly. They're cost-competitive with any of the other custom decal producers. The NKPHTS just ran full-sized sheets of two-color decals for far less than $5 a sheet. (if you want good Duluxe color saturation, ask for color "DCX3").

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


On Thursday, November 2, 2017, 10:02:37 AM CDT, destorzek@... [STMFC]




I think the key to the problem was mentioned several pages of messages back... The big problem with short run printing of decals is finding a system that can print white, since most computer printers rely on the white paper showing through. ALPS printers used a ribbon that was thermally set to the decal paper, and included white for use as a backer to overprint transparent colors like red over other colors. The ALPS technology is almost history now.

The other industry that uses white printing is custom T shirts. But fabrics are printed with a thick rubberized ink that adheres to the threads in the weave. Someone stated a while back that Tichy is using a "modified fabric print head." I suspect the ink in the process is not optimist for printing decals.

Hope he gets the kinks worked out.

Dennis Storzek



Re: Tichy decals (was RE: Decal Adhesive)

Dennis Storzek
 

I think the key to the problem was mentioned several pages of messages back... The big problem with short run printing of decals is finding a system that can print white, since most computer printers rely on the white paper showing through. ALPS printers used a ribbon that was thermally set to the decal paper, and included white for use as a backer to overprint transparent colors like red over other colors. The ALPS technology is almost history now.

The other industry that uses white printing is custom T shirts. But fabrics are printed with a thick rubberized ink that adheres to the threads in the weave. Someone stated a while back that Tichy is using a "modified fabric print head." I suspect the ink in the process is not optimist for printing decals.

Hope he gets the kinks worked out.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Decals

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <b.hom@...> wrote :


No.  These are not dry transfers, but  form of waterslide decal where the printed lettering is printed on the underside of the carrier film.  The decal is wetted, applied to the model, and is allowed to dry.  If everything is working correctly, once you lift the carrier film, the lettering remains.  The problems I encountered were either the lettering failed to completely release from the film once applied and dried, partially tearing away from the model, or the lettering floated off the carrier film.  Since the lettering is very thin, it is very difficult to fish out and apply without damaging it.
======================

The way decals are made:

The carrier paper is given a coat of mucilage (water soluble glue.) When dry, it is given a coat of clear varnish; this becomes the decal film. It is possible to print this layer as spots, Microscale did this on some sets, but the spots have to be big enough to ensure the lettering is printed on the varnish, so people tend to trim them anyway. The lettering is then printed on the varnish. 

To apply, the sheet is soaked in water, When the water soaks through the paper, the mucilage releases the varnish.

Reverse decals differ in that the lettering is the first thing printed over the mucilage, then another coat of mucilage is applied over the lettering, then the varnish is applied. The initial soak frees the varnish and lettering from the paper; further soak time on the model frees the varnish from the lettering so it can be removed, leaving just the lettering on the model. Tricky to work with. The people who do it for the importers do it all day long and hone their skill. They also have extra lettering sets to replace any elements they bone up.

Dennis Storzek


RPM Chicagoland

Eric Hansmann
 

I've posted a short summary of RPM Chicagoland on the Resin Car Works blog. It is impossible to catch everything and I know I missed a new product or two. Consider this as just one person's view of the event. A couple photo gallery links are included in the post. Enjoy!

http://blog.resincarworks.com/rpm-reflections/


Eric Hansmann

RCW web guy


Re: Hopper Bottom Boxcar

Jeff Eggert
 

This is pushing the group time frame, but sometime between 1958 and 1963, there was a proposal by the CNW mechanical department to rebuild some of their war emergency boxcars into covered hoppers.  To the best of my knowledge this never happened.  It went as far as a car diagram proposing 4 roof hatches, 2 discharge gates, and 2 grain access doors.  They even estimated the light weight of 55,600 lb and having 3047 ft.

Jeff Eggert


Re: Tichy decals (was RE: Decal Adhesive)

Ken Roth
 

I would agree with Fred.  As I said in my first message, I have two sets of  the SP Tank Car decals (same lettering on both): one from Jerry Glow, the other from Tichy.  THEY ARE NOT THE SAME.  The ink on the Tichy decals is very thick.  The ones from Jerry are totally different and have worked fine for me, even over rivets.

Ken Roth


Film about West India Fruit

Bill Welch
 

Here is a publicity film about West India Fruit with many steam freight cars in view at various points in the film. I have to wonder how many of the vehicles seen ares still in use?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dLO0qNmSZ7s


Bill Welch



Re: FW: Vintage tractors in all scales

Jack Mullen
 

All scales? I see HO and S offered. Not sure I want to know what they'd cost in 1:48.
Jack Mullen


Re: Decals

gary laakso
 

I used this process on 12 of the W&R DRGW gondolas with no problems encountered, though it was just the car numbers being applied.

 

Gary Laakso

Northwest of Mike Brock

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 1, 2017 6:01 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Decals

 

 

Bill Pardie wrote:
"Should this process prove to be viable I don't think that the decal manufacturers would be receptive to converting."

 

Many modelers are already reluctant to attempt decaling.  A decal manufacturer who sells a product like this to a typical modeler will guarantee zero repeat customers.  Tony and I are not making up our difficulties with this product - while it does produce excellent results, I would not want to letter all of models in this fashion and would be happy to leave this to the brass manufacturers and your friend.

 

If you continue to doubt me, get yourself a brass model with these decals and give it a try.

 

 

Ben Hom

31661 - 31680 of 185225