Date   
Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] OMI 1930-built double dome tank car

vapeurchapelon
 

They originally came with "ordinary" .110 wheels. I am not aware of any OMI model with different ones. But W&R had .88 wheels at least on several if not most of their freight car models.
Thanks for the hint to the CBC!
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Dienstag, 12. November 2019 um 18:59 Uhr
Von: "Jon Miller" <atsfus@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] OMI 1930-built double dome tank car
On 11/12/2019 9:23 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
therefore would like to find some information.

    Old mind, but now seem to remember that a picture is in one of the CBCs.  Mine are all at the other house so I can't look it up.  A question, as I said in an additional post mine has .066 wheels sets.  Did they come this way (what are yours) or were they added.  Seems strange and the only brass cars I have ever seen with scale or close to scale treads.  Years ago I bought a set of scale wheels to use with contest cars.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] OMI 1930-built double dome tank car

Jon Miller
 

On 11/12/2019 9:23 AM, vapeurchapelon wrote:
therefore would like to find some information.

    Old mind, but now seem to remember that a picture is in one of the CBCs.  Mine are all at the other house so I can't look it up.  A question, as I said in an additional post mine has .066 wheels sets.  Did they come this way (what are yours) or were they added.  Seems strange and the only brass cars I have ever seen with scale or close to scale treads.  Years ago I bought a set of scale wheels to use with contest cars.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: Square brake staffs, was New images on Steamtown site today

Brent Greer
 

I visited an antique dealer in Orlando this past weekend and happened to spot these so I took some photos for the group. Unfortunately there were no manufacturers markings on them that I could see.

Brent

________________________________
Dr. J. Brent Greer

Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] OMI 1930-built double dome tank car

vapeurchapelon
 

I too have one of these. Yes, 8000gals, at least OMI advertised it as that. Nonetheless maybe too large, but for itself it is a nice model (perhaps only if one doesn't know too much about tank cars) and I definitely want to have it painted and therefore would like to find some information.
 
Johannes
Modeling the early post-war years up to about 1953
 
Gesendet: Mittwoch, 06. November 2019 um 19:43 Uhr
Von: "Jon Miller" <atsfus@...>
An: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Betreff: Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] OMI 1930-built double dome tank car

    Since we are talking about 2 dome cars does anyone have information on this one.  Bought it off (probably) eBay years ago.  At one time I may have known but am getting forgetful.  It came, to me, with the .088 wheelsets, and all painted black.  I'm guessing 8K without doing any measurements. (brass of course)

 

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
SPROG User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: Tri-Sorb snubbers on reefers

Tony Thompson
 


On Nov 12, 2019, at 2:28 AM, Paul Woods wrote:

The figures got me thinking....nine round trips in three months is a cycle time of ten days, give or take - I can't decide if the text is saying nine round trips per car or combined total for both cars . . .

     As most freight cars averaged less than nine trips PER YEAR, these not only have to be the trips for both cars, but are still remarkable. PFE was proud that its cars averaged between ten and eleven round trips per year, higher than any other reefer owner and higher than most railroads' freight cars of any type. For these two cars to have made so many trips suggest that they were (a) short trips, and (b) probably hastened along for test purposes.

Tony Thompson



Re: Hormel Meat Reefer traffic was Tri-Sorb snubbers on reefers

Tony Thompson
 

Bruce Smith wrote:

There is a lot of data, real data (as opposed to anecdotes), that supports a high amount of reefer traffic on the PRR. The PRR was the third highest conveyor of produce in the nation,  behind SP and UP (beating AT&SF) and the number one conveyer of loaded produce refrigerator cars east of the Mississippi. 

       I am not one who disputes these facts. What I always point out, which was pointed out to me by a retired PFE executive, is that PRR had the highest perishable damage claims, PER TON MILE, of any railroad. That isn't just a lot of claims because they were a big railroad, it's a lot of claims, period. And it's the reason that PFE agents advised shippers to route on railroads OTHER THAN the PRR as far as possible.
       But as Bruce says, the PRR was not entirely avoidable throughout much of the northeast and in the biggest cities of the day, New York and Philadelphia. Empty return was not as time critical, so PRR may have had a huge share in empty mileage, as Bruce mentions.

Tony Thompson



Re: How's Tichy doing currently, decal thickness and all?

Chuck Cover
 

Group,

 

I have not used many Tichy decals but those that I have used were fine.  I recently used Don Tichy’s C&EI decals on a Sunshine Mather boxcar. 

 

I think factual information about various products is a valuable topic for this group, however, it is unfortunate that topics like this one turn out to become a bitch fest about some product or manufacturer. 

 

Chuck Cover

Santa Fe, NM

Re: How's Tichy doing currently, decal thickness and all?

Roger Huber
 

Obviously they have some QC issues. The first ones from them must have been remnants from Jerry Glow.

I still think people should try them rather than just throw them away. Maybe what one guy thinks is too thick may be acceptable for others. Just like cars where some don't have issues with cast on grabs and ladders while others won't accept them. 

Maybe to have a reefer lettered for ABCX with thicker decals is more important than not having that car?

Opinions (like mine, too) are not gospel.

Roger Huber
Deer Creek Locomotive Works


On Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 10:14:30 AM CST, Brian Carlson via Groups.Io <prrk41361@...> wrote:


Mine were so thick they would conform to the surface. The same issue as was discussed when they first came out. I ended up cobbling several other sources. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Nov 12, 2019, at 11:05 AM, Roger Huber via Groups.Io <trainpainter@...> wrote:


I'm sorry but I don't quite understand everyone wanting just throw them away. If you've already ordered and paid for them why not at least test them and see if they are good to use? Apparently from what I've read here and other places some sets are fine and others are too thick. If they are decals for a RR or company you thought enough of to buy for a piece of equipment then try them to see if they meet your standards? If they don't cut the mustard then they are easy to remove and THEN throw them away?

I haven't tried them yet but have purchased several different sets. Having been in the hobby for so many years I've worked with most brands and many have some unusual characteristics and all. I doubt if they can be much worse than the crap from Walthers we used for years.

Just my 2¢

Roger Huber
Deer Creek Locomotive Works


On Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 09:35:40 AM CST, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend@...> wrote:


I have a set. I’ll throw them away and save you the 8 bucks.


Re: How's Tichy doing currently, decal thickness and all?

Brian Carlson
 

Mine were so thick they would conform to the surface. The same issue as was discussed when they first came out. I ended up cobbling several other sources. 

Brian J. Carlson 

On Nov 12, 2019, at 11:05 AM, Roger Huber via Groups.Io <trainpainter@...> wrote:


I'm sorry but I don't quite understand everyone wanting just throw them away. If you've already ordered and paid for them why not at least test them and see if they are good to use? Apparently from what I've read here and other places some sets are fine and others are too thick. If they are decals for a RR or company you thought enough of to buy for a piece of equipment then try them to see if they meet your standards? If they don't cut the mustard then they are easy to remove and THEN throw them away?

I haven't tried them yet but have purchased several different sets. Having been in the hobby for so many years I've worked with most brands and many have some unusual characteristics and all. I doubt if they can be much worse than the crap from Walthers we used for years.

Just my 2¢

Roger Huber
Deer Creek Locomotive Works


On Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 09:35:40 AM CST, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend@...> wrote:


I have a set. I’ll throw them away and save you the 8 bucks.


Re: How's Tichy doing currently, decal thickness and all?

Roger Huber
 

I'm sorry but I don't quite understand everyone wanting just throw them away. If you've already ordered and paid for them why not at least test them and see if they are good to use? Apparently from what I've read here and other places some sets are fine and others are too thick. If they are decals for a RR or company you thought enough of to buy for a piece of equipment then try them to see if they meet your standards? If they don't cut the mustard then they are easy to remove and THEN throw them away?

I haven't tried them yet but have purchased several different sets. Having been in the hobby for so many years I've worked with most brands and many have some unusual characteristics and all. I doubt if they can be much worse than the crap from Walthers we used for years.

Just my 2¢

Roger Huber
Deer Creek Locomotive Works


On Tuesday, November 12, 2019, 09:35:40 AM CST, Richard Townsend via Groups.Io <richtownsend@...> wrote:


I have a set. I’ll throw them away and save you the 8 bucks.


Re: NP Refrigerators

npin53
 

That is correct for the 30's. 

Aaron

Re: Square brake staffs

Matt Smith
 

Has anyone looked into square wire that bead and jewelry makers use? I see it comes in stainless and various gauges close to .015. Its appears to be available at Michaels and Hobby Lobby. 
--
Matt Smith
Bloomington, IL

Re: How's Tichy doing currently, decal thickness and all?

Richard Townsend
 

I have a set. I’ll throw them away and save you the 8 bucks.

Re: Nalco Weed Sprayer and tank cars

Steve and Barb Hile
 

Doug,
 
These Nalco sprayers seem to just come in under the wire for the Steam Era list, being circa 1959 builds as National Aluminate sought to diversify from its primary focus of steam locomotive water treatment chemicals into a broader spectrum of chemical products and services, including weed spraying.  It was in 1959 that it changed its name to Nalco.
 
If I were wanting to do one of these cars, I would probably start with an Intermountain AAR 10'6" boxcar kit.  The separate ends would make it easy to substitute cut-up Tichy USRA 5-5-5 ends.  As Jack Mullen suggests, a radial roof seems appropriate.  The car side tabs would have to go and the side door opening be filled.  Archer Rivets could be used, either on the replacement panel or on a smooth full side to get the 12 total panels.  How far to lower the rear of the sides and what is on the top of that platform will be the challenge.  I found a small side view shot using Google leading to Pinterest, but could not pull up a decent image.  You would think that there could be some article of advertisement in the RR press of the late 50's that could show some more details.
 
Good luck,
Steve Hile



From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Doug Forbes
Sent: Monday, November 11, 2019 11:43 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Nalco Weed Sprayer and tank cars

Thanks, that would be my blog on MRH.  Maybe I should have elaborated more.  My brother purchased the Great Northern Railway historical society weed sprayer kit but hasn't gotten around to building it so he let me have a go at it.  We were hoping it would be a close stand into the NALCO weed sprayer that was used on the C&EI as in the original post.  However, even a short glance shows that the GNR weed sprayer is much too different to be a close match.  Therefore, I am looking for suggestions on which type of boxcar would be a good starting point for a kitbash of the NALCO sprayer.  Does anyone recognize the corrugation patterns on the end? 
I also wanted to include a few in progress shots of the GNRHS weed sprayer resin kit. 

Re: NP Refrigerators

radiodial868
 

Duoh!  I shoulda known that having built 7 F&C T&G NP boxcars. And as Andy pointed out, the underframe was fishbelly too. I also seriously doubt that Monad herald is appropriate for 1930's either.
Two more for eBay!
Thanks all,
RJ Dial

Hormel Meat Reefer traffic was Tri-Sorb snubbers on reefers

Bruce Smith
 

Doug,

I’m not surprised at all about the PRR. There is a lot of data, real data (as opposed to anecdotes), that supports a high amount of reefer traffic on the PRR. The PRR was the third highest conveyor of produce in the nation,  behind SP and UP (beating AT&SF) and the number one conveyer of loaded produce refrigerator cars east of the Mississippi. I don’t see why, with the PRR's routing and connections, that should be any different for meat ;)  Now, before the usual characters (you know who you are) jump in, I will note that loaded versus empty mileage is not differentiated and the relatively high mileage on the Erie probably does indicate a propensity to send loads in that direction and empties home via the PRR. However loads, and lots of them, are also moving via the PRR. And yes, I know, the PRR probably had the highest damage claims of any of the railroads listed. But enough of this silliness that perishables weren’t shipped via the PRR. They were, and typically in amounts greater than any other eastern railroad. So I’ll happily model large blocks on reefers on the PRR, thank you!

I’m also curious why you state what you do about Northern Pacific, given that the Milwaukee Road, being a western bridge route, had the second most miles (to the PRR’s #1) with 17,500 while the NP had a miniscule 3,800. I would have said that the CMStP&P was Hormel’s western route…

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."




On Nov 12, 2019, at 8:30 AM, Douglas Harding <doug.harding@...> wrote:
<SNIP>
I am surprised by the number of miles of the PPR as it was a road avoided by most meat packers until final destination. It appears the NP was Hormel’s choice for moving meat west.
<SNIP>

Re: Tri-Sorb snubbers on reefers

Douglas Harding
 

Paul, the cars in the article were Hormel Meat reefers. In the 30s, Hormel had one plant at Austin MN, served by the MILW and the CGW. That would account for the large number of miles on those two roads. Most of the other roads on the list are eastern roads, many with connections in Chicago. In the 30’s meat was slaughtered in the mid-west and consumed in the east. So Hormel cars were moved east via Chicago then passed on to eastern roads via Indiana Harbor Belt.  NKP, NYC, ERIE  were all known for moving meat, fast. I am surprised by the number of miles of the PPR as it was a road avoided by most meat packers until final destination. It appears the NP was Hormel’s choice for moving meat west. And the Southern and C&O were used for moving meat to the SE.

 

Meat reefers were in leased captive service, and returned quickly. Cars leased to Hormel would all be returned to Austin. It’s possible they went through North American’s repair facility on their return, but they did not sit idle. Figure one day for cleaning inspection. If done on site, then icing and loading could also occur that same day, or the next day as the cars had to cool down after cleaning. Cooling took about 4 hours. Once loaded meat reefers were switched and moved. Typical departure from Austin late afternoon or early evening with arrival at IHB Chicago at 1:30pm the next day, switched reiced and interchanged with eastern road by evening. Overnight to icing station in Ohio or further east, then on to New York City, Boston or Philadelphia markets. Unloading the 4th  or  5th morning after being loaded. Then begins the return trips, no need to stop for icing, but perhaps a stop at North American for inspection and repairs. A 10 or 12 day turn around is not out of the question. But a load every 20 days was typical for meat reefers.

 

Yes the cars could sit idle somewhere. But meat packers did not want those cars sitting idle, so they had agents across the country who keep those cars moving. It was best to see your leased reefer sitting at your own storage yard next to your plant.

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Paul Woods
Sent: Tuesday, November 12, 2019 4:28 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Tri-Sorb snubbers on reefers

 

Jim,

Thanks for posting this, it is a great find.  It is interesting that the top three railroads conveyed the cars for half of their total mileage, but what I found most informative was the large number of roads that only accounted for a small mileage, meaning that the cars probably visited/passed through many of them only once in the 13 months that they were being monitored.  Anyone with more freight cars on their layout than they know what to do with should rejoice, because it would seem that some cars should only be seen once a year....they could be considered to be the model railroad equivalent of Haley's Comet!

The figures got me thinking....nine round trips in three months is a cycle time of ten days, give or take - I can't decide if the text is saying nine round trips per car or combined total for both cars so I'm assuming shortest turnaround time in this instance.  I'm guessing that the cars would be moved quite rapidly once loaded, only taking two or three days to reach destination and be unloaded, so how was the remaining time taken up?  They would have to be cleaned, sure, but what I am most curious about is how much time such cars would spend just parked in a spur waiting for the next call to action?  It could add some extra operational interest, sending a switcher out to store or retrieve empty cars all over a layout.  What happened to private-owner cars; were they always stenciled with a 'when empty return to....' or could they be left hanging around the destination road's tracks until next called upon?

I know foreign-road cars would be returned as soon as possible, but certainly home road cars might need to be stored for a while, and even foreign cars might have to be stored for a day or two until the next local could pick them up.  If it's the depths of winter and your sorting yard is jammed up with coal hoppers then might an empty reefer get shoved down a spur out of the way for a day?  Am I forgetting some important car handling rule or is this a situation that arose now and then?

Regards
Paul

Re: Tri-Sorb snubbers on reefers

Paul Woods
 

Jim,

Thanks for posting this, it is a great find.  It is interesting that the top three railroads conveyed the cars for half of their total mileage, but what I found most informative was the large number of roads that only accounted for a small mileage, meaning that the cars probably visited/passed through many of them only once in the 13 months that they were being monitored.  Anyone with more freight cars on their layout than they know what to do with should rejoice, because it would seem that some cars should only be seen once a year....they could be considered to be the model railroad equivalent of Haley's Comet!

The figures got me thinking....nine round trips in three months is a cycle time of ten days, give or take - I can't decide if the text is saying nine round trips per car or combined total for both cars so I'm assuming shortest turnaround time in this instance.  I'm guessing that the cars would be moved quite rapidly once loaded, only taking two or three days to reach destination and be unloaded, so how was the remaining time taken up?  They would have to be cleaned, sure, but what I am most curious about is how much time such cars would spend just parked in a spur waiting for the next call to action?  It could add some extra operational interest, sending a switcher out to store or retrieve empty cars all over a layout.  What happened to private-owner cars; were they always stenciled with a 'when empty return to....' or could they be left hanging around the destination road's tracks until next called upon?

I know foreign-road cars would be returned as soon as possible, but certainly home road cars might need to be stored for a while, and even foreign cars might have to be stored for a day or two until the next local could pick them up.  If it's the depths of winter and your sorting yard is jammed up with coal hoppers then might an empty reefer get shoved down a spur out of the way for a day?  Am I forgetting some important car handling rule or is this a situation that arose now and then?

Regards
Paul

Re: How's Tichy doing currently, decal thickness and all?

Fred Jansz
 

I need Tichy #10013 Western Asphalt set for my OMI 10K Gal tank car.
Takes only $4 with $4 shipping, $8 total.
But if I have to dump the set right away, I'd rather spend the 8 bucks on something else.
Fred Jansz

Re: Nalco Weed Sprayer and tank cars

Jack Mullen
 

On Mon, Nov 11, 2019 at 09:42 PM, Doug Forbes wrote:
Therefore, I am looking for suggestions on which type of boxcar would be a good starting point for a kitbash of the NALCO sprayer.  Does anyone recognize the corrugation patterns on the end? 
5 corrugations in a panel so the cars were originally USRA boxcars with 5/5/5 Murphy ends. The ends were widened when the cars were rebuilt with steel sides, so the originals were single sheathed. The middle panel of the end, (mostly removed to form the large windows) is taller than the top or bottom sections, so the car's height was increased by adding a strip in the middle rather than at the top of the end. They received Hutchins radial roofs in the rebuild. 
C&O had a fairly large group of USRA SS boxcars rebuilt in the '30s iirc with Youngstown sides, Hutchins roofs and additional height added in the middle panel of the end, so I bet those were the source of Nalco's cars.
It appears that Sunshine made a kit for the C&O rebuilds.

Jack Mullen