Date   

Photo: PRR Gondolas With Wood Grinder Loads (1910)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: PRR Gondolas With Wood Grinder Loads (1910)

A photo from the Hagley Museum:

https://digital.hagley.org/72350_0861?solr_nav%5Bid%5D=d56b54be5b2005e726f3&solr_nav%5Bpage%5D=5&solr_nav%5Boffset%5D=5

This photo can be enlarged quite a bit.

Note "PL" reporting marks.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Dr. Denny Anspach, MD 1934-2020

Kurt Stoebe
 

I learned about Dr Anspach through this group. I contacted him a couple of years ago and introduced myself. I told him we were both  part time residents of West Okoboji and suggested that we meet sometime when he was there. Unfortunately this did not happen. 

I discovered the location of the the Anspach home on one of my morning walks.  It was easy to identify through the unique placement of a semaphore signal head near the garage . 

I was greatly saddened to learn of the doctor’s placement in hospice last week. Early Sunday morning while on my walk, I stopped in the Anspach driveway and thought of all the enjoyment that he and brother had through the years on West Okoboji. 

Then I was chilled with the thought that he would probably never see it again.

There is a nature preserve near the cabin that is dedicated to another member of the family. They have certainly left a legacy for all of us. 

To a life well lived!

Kurt Stoebe
Humboldt,IA


Re: Dr. Denny Anspach, MD 1934-2020

william darnaby
 

I don't know what to say that has not already been said about Denny, especially in relation to our engaging hobby.  I knew him from another angle as he became my mentor in all things wood boats.  His family had, or still has, an impressive collection of wood runabouts and my wife and I had the pleasure of riding in them and even piloting them during our visits to Okoboji to see Denny and Carol.  I have spent nearly my entire life on one of the twin lakes surrounding Monticello, Indiana and had desired a wood runabout since childhood but did not know where to start.  Denny coached me with his usual enthusiasm about what to look for and what to watch out for in a wood boat.  With that knowledge I made the purchase of a 1955 Chris-Craft in 2006 and had the pleasure of taking Denny and Carol for rides in it on one of their all too infrequent journeys through Indiana.  He approved.

Bill Darnaby



Re: RIP: Denny S. Anspach

Mont Switzer
 

Jeff and all,

 

There are not enough words to describe what Denny meant to both my wife and I.  Jeff, I could not  have said it any better.

 

Looking back,

 

Denny liked to build wood kits and he was a master at it.  Once I knew this I purchased some “golden oldies” at train shows and sent them to him to enjoy.  Then I found a wood kit I wanted to keep.  It was partly built, no remaining parts, no instructions or manufacturer information.  I sent it to Denny and asked if he would complete it figuring he had a stash of vintage detail parts.  The car came back beautifully done along with a history of the model as well and the manufacturer.  I will always think of Denny when I see that car. 

 

A visit to Denny’s layout was a pleasure.  Many if not most of his cars were from wood and metal kits.  They were so well done you would not recognize this until he shared the sources of the models.

 

Denny was meticulous about his fine brass collector locomotives.   They had to run perfectly before he would install DCC and sound.  His painting was masterful also.

 

I could go on and on.  Seeing him twice per year was not often enough.  He always had more to share.  Denny was Denny and that was just fine with me.

 

Mont

 

Montford L. Switzer

President

Switzer Tank Lines, Inc.

Fall Creek Leasing, LLC.

mswitzer@...

(765) 836-2914

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Aley, Jeff A
Sent: Sunday, September 20, 2020 10:22 PM
To: RealSTMFC@groups.io; PassengerCarList@groups.io; RockIslandLines@groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] RIP: Denny S. Anspach

 

It is my sad duty to inform you that my great friend, Denny Anspach, passed away today, September 20, 2020.  Denny was a man of great accomplishments, not only within our hobby of prototype and model railroading, but also in other areas.  But to me his greatest attribute was his friendship and mentoring – which I will try to “pay forward” until we meet again.  I was often impressed by the fact that he knew so many great individuals.  I gradually learned that Denny had a tremendous ability to focus on a person’s best traits, no matter who they were.  All people are great and highly accomplished in some way, and Denny always spoke of a person’s finest character.

 

I will miss him tremendously.

 

-Jeff Aley

 


Re: Murphy flat-panel roofs

George Corral
 

Pierre Oliver said, "I have them in resin
http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com/index.php/Products/4238R

Pierre,
Is the roof to which you refer commonly known as the Murphy Solid-steel roof that essentially replaced the Murphy outside-steel roof and the Hutchins Dry-Lading roofs on many re-builds?

George Corral


Re: Proto 2000 Stock Car

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Ray,

You should be able to find some of these at a train show (if we ever have them again!), or on eBay. The stock cars don't seem to have sold particularly well, and lots of them got dumped on the outlet markets.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Mon, Sep 21, 2020 at 9:31 PM Ray Carson via groups.io <PrewarUPModeler=protonmail.com@groups.io> wrote:

Thanks everyone for your responses, they are very helpful. If the kit is still at my LHS, then I may get it.

The general stock car practices are also useful.

-Ray


Re: Accurail 4300: CB&Q 15000-15499 or C&S 13500 series

Robert kirkham
 

Another good tip - thanks Dennis!
Rob

On Sep 21, 2020, at 11:48 AM, Dennis Storzek <destorzek@...> wrote:

Really nice work on the C&S car. I see, like the Soo Line, the C&S didn't see any utility in applying a brake step.

I was familiar with at least some of the Q's single sheathed cars from the numerous car bodies that used to be on farms around here, twenty miles from the shops in Aurora, but having incomplete bodies is one thing, real builders drawings are better, and those came via Ken Goslett and Stafford Swain courtesy of the Canadian Railway Historical Society museum in Delson, PQ, so the basis for the Accurail car became a CN car. Back in those days whatever we did was going to be a stand-in for 99 out of a 100 road names anyway, but I wanted good drawings to get at least that 100th car right.

If I could make one suggestion for an additional improvement, carve the back off the lower brake staff support. The prototype is really bent bar stock and the back edges should really be parallel to the outer edge. The part on the model became triangular to add some meat to make it less delicate and simplify tool construction.

Dennis Storzek
Accurail, Inc. 


Re: Accurail 4300: CB&Q 15000-15499 or C&S 13500 series

Robert kirkham
 

Thanks for that idea - should have thought of it myself: I think that is one of Greg Martin’s Coco beach tips?

Rob

On Sep 21, 2020, at 10:17 AM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:

Robert,

 

I would suggest that you make a wood block that just fits inside the car body.  It provides support for the car sides when you want to do something like shave off that band across the car door.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 12:53 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Accurail 4300: CB&Q 15000-15499 or C&S 13500 series

 

First progress shots on kit bashing Accurail 4300 series model into a C&S 13500-13999.  



Stripped most of the paint - that was stubborn!  Used both 99% alcohol and that purple stuff (can’t recall the name).   



Used a new knife blade and single edge razor blade to shave off the ladder and grab irons.  



I started cutting the roof off with a 1.25” circular blade in the drill press, moving the car into the blade with the car body resting on a fitted block that helped keep the car body level.  I made it from a scrap of plywood about 3” x 8”, and glued on a rectangle of balsa wood to fit tightly inside the shell.  Drilled a shallow hole into the plywood base where the bottom of the vertical brake stand protrudes lower than the rest of the shell.   The plywood and balsa block worked OK, but I still had to hold the shell down on it with my hands.  That’s not ideal around moving cutters!  If I was to do it again, I’d clamp a fence of some sort in place rather than guiding the block free-hand.   That would control the federate better and be safer as well.  



I ran into a problem with the blade melting the plastic rather than clearing chips of plastic saw dust.  This accumulated and - after I thought I was nearly through - the blade wandered upward just enough to spoil some roof detail.   I could blame the blade, which was flimsy, but I think the whole method was a bit too much for the set up.   I switched the blade out for an end mill and cleaned things up that way.   I’m planning to add some Yarmouth (Stafford Swain and Dan Kirlin) Hutchins roof panels to replace the original roof.     



Not sure if I have the nerve to remove the horizontal angle iron across the mid-height of the door . . .   Also, not yet sure I will carve the ladder (or the obviously wrong right ladder stile) off the end.   

 

Rob<image001.jpg><image002.jpg>

 




Re: Proto 2000 Stock Car

Ray Carson
 

Thanks everyone for your responses, they are very helpful. If the kit is still at my LHS, then I may get it.

The general stock car practices are also useful.

-Ray


Re: Accurail 4300: CB&Q 15000-15499 or C&S 13500 series

Ray Carson
 

René,

As somebody that also has the Accurail 4300 body and have plans of turning that into a C&S prototype, this is some very good modeling. This will also be a useful guide for me.

I haven't got far on my model, but I hope to get it nicely as yours.

-Ray


Dr. Denny Anspach, MD 1934-2020

Jack Burgess
 

I had long heard that Denny was heavily involved in the creation of the California State Railroad Museum which is confirmed by this account.

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: California State Railroad Museum Foundation [mailto:info@...]
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 11:39 AM
To: jack@...
Subject: In Memoriam: Dr. Denny Anspach, MD 1934-2020

 

 

A Lifelong Rail Enthusiast & Advocate,

California State Railroad Museum Foundation Board Member

Dr. Denny Anspach, M.D., Passed Away September 20

 

 

 

Dr. Denny Anspach M.D., a highly esteemed member of the California State Railroad Museum Foundation Board of Directors, passed away on Sunday, September 20, 2020 at the age of 86 after a long battle with cancer. A passionate rail enthusiast, Dr. Anspach was instrumental in the vision for and creation of the California State Railroad Museum that opened in 1981.

 

Born in Chicago in 1934, Dr. Anspach was a graduate of Stanford University medical school, a retired radiologist in Sacramento (which included serving as Chief of Radiology at Sutter General Hospital), and Arden Park resident for 50+ years. While growing up in Chicago, Dr. Anspach had a fascination with railroads from a young age and was committed to preserving their legacy over the course of his entire lifetime. After relocating to Sacramento, Dr. Anspach hosted a historic dinner in 1970 for California Governor Ronald Reagan aboard the Gold Coast, an occasion designed to win the governor’s support for what would one day become the California State Railroad Museum. Ronald Reagan would later turn the first shovelful of dirt to signify the start of the construction of the museum.

 

“There is no question that we would not have the California State Railroad Museum without Dr. Denny Anspach, he was truly the ‘Founding Father,” said Cheryl Marcell, President & CEO of the California State Railroad Museum Foundation. “He was my guide, my historian, and my counselor in all things as I stepped into the role of President & CEO of the Foundation. I cherished our long breakfast meetings at The Sutter Club, our travels throughout the country and enjoyed listening and learning. He would often say that we shouldn’t get bogged down by policies and procedures and if it was the right thing to do, we should just do it! He will forever be remembered for his passion and his dedication and we are all better human beings by knowing Dr. Denny Anspach.” 

 

Dr. Anspach was also the founding president of the Sacramento Trust for Historic Preservation and was the primary author of the nearly 200-page “California State Railroad Museum: Recommendations for Planning & Development” that was published in 1972 and served as the master plan for the world-class museum. He served as the unofficial but effective custodian of many prized locomotive and was instrumental in the relocation of the Gov. Stanford, the Central Pacific railroad's first locomotive that remains on display in the Railroad Museum. He was honored to serve as master of ceremonies for the grand opening of the California State Railroad Museum (that coincided with Railfair ’81) at the Old Sacramento Waterfront.

 

“Dr. Denny Anspach was a public servant not by vocation but by advocation,” said Ty Smith, Museum Director for the California State Railroad Museum. “Over the last three years, I had the great pleasure of traveling, laughing, and learning with him. I came to understand that, although he had many interests, three things animated his life: his family, his work as a medical doctor, and his stewardship of the California State Railroad Museum. I intend to honor his legacy by putting my maximum effort into ensuring that the Museum will continue to help people imagine their futures, by understanding our collective past. Dr. Anspach has passed, but his good work is forever enshrined in the Museum and the community.”

 

In 2014, the national Railway & Locomotive Historical Society presented Dr. Anspach with the prestigious Gerald M. Best Senior Achievement Award, named for the famed railroad historian. Up until his death, Dr. Anspach remained active on the Board of Directors of the California State Railroad Museum Foundation, an organization he helped to create, and served on its executive committee. He is survived by his wife Rev. Diane Wenthe, daughter Carolyn Smith and son-in-Law Kenneth Smith, son David Anspach, granddaughter Anna Smith, grandson David Smith, and brother Dr. William Anspach. At the request of the family and in lieu of flowers, any remembrance donations should be made to the California State Railroad Museum Foundation. Click here to make a memorial donation.

 

The California State Railroad Museum Foundation recently commissioned the creation of a bronze bust in honor of Dr. Anspach that will be put on display at the museum in the near future. 

 

 

 

 

About the California State Railroad Museum Foundation 

The California State Railroad Museum Foundation supports both the California State Railroad Museum, in Sacramento, and Railtown 1897 State Historic Park in Jamestown. Our mission is to generate revenue and awareness on behalf of these destinations while supporting the preservation, interpretation and promotion of our railroad heritage. 

 

 

 

California State Railroad Museum Foundation | 106 K St., Suite 200, Sacramento, CA 95814

Trusted Email from Constant Contact - Try it FREE today.

 


Re: Accurail 4300: CB&Q 15000-15499 or C&S 13500 series

Robert Allan
 

Excellent results. You have a steady hand. Turned out picture perfect.

Bob Allan
Omaha


Re: Murphy flat-panel roofs

Pierre Oliver
 

I have them in resin
http://www.yarmouthmodelworks.com/index.php/Products/4238R

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 9/21/20 5:18 p.m., Richard Townsend via groups.io wrote:

Does anyone know of a source, preferably in plastic, of Murphy flat-panel roofs in HO? These are like the diagonal-panel and rectangular-panel roofs, but without the raised panels (i.e. flat between the roof seam caps). Train Miniature had some cars with these roofs, but they are unusually narrow.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Re: Proto 2000 Stock Car

Ray Breyer
 

Yes and no. Those original 40 foot Mather stock cars were stretched 36-footers, which they had too many of and which nobody wanted to lease. They started stretching them around 1928, but forgot that the center sills were a bit small (6" C channel, IIRC). They tended to sag a little too much, so Mather added two trussrods along the center sill to strengthen it (traditionally, trussrods are used to hold an all-wood BODY together, not a steel frame).

By the early Depression years the stretched cars, and the newly built 40-footers, had a stronger underframe, and the trussrods were eliminated. I have a few photos of WWII-era Mather cars that still have the rods, mostly on long term lease C&NW cars.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL



On Monday, September 21, 2020, 06:08:54 AM CDT, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:


[Edited Message Follows]

Circa 1939 photos I own show L&N and CNW Mather stock cars with truss rod u/f.

Bill Welch


Re: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Group;

 

For those that like their GR’s old, go dig up these from the Hagley.  They are full of nice details.

 

Have any of you done a model of a shifted load for your operators to spot and set out?  I loved confounding my operators with bad order cars, offal loads, shifted loads, and other such aggravations.  One of my faves was a shifted structural steel load that was crawling out the dropped end threatening to go outside the clearance diagram of the idler flat.

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 4:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

 

Hi Bob and List Members,

 

A wonderful photo of a PRR class GR composite gon. Note this car class was built with drop ends, and the dropped end nearest the camera does not look too good! Still lettered in early style center bar lettering, and also archbar trucks. Note the outside stake pockets, some of which were recently in use by all appearances.

 

Undated image, but perhaps an automobile historian could tell us something about the date based in the lovely vehicle in the background.

 

Note that the dimensional lumber at the lumberyard (at right) was stacked before the common use of forklifts - there are no spacers in the stacks of lumber to use as an entry point for the fork.

 

The string of mostly 36ft cars in the background is fun to look at as well! The obligatory NP boxcar is indeed present. I note the INTERCOLONIAL boxcar on the left, when did that lettering go away?

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 1:28 PM

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

 

Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

A photo from the Detroit Public Library:

Blockedhttps://digitalcollections.detroitpubliclibrary.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A160440

Click and hold to enlarge photo.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Murphy flat-panel roofs

Richard Townsend
 

Does anyone know of a source, preferably in plastic, of Murphy flat-panel roofs in HO? These are like the diagonal-panel and rectangular-panel roofs, but without the raised panels (i.e. flat between the roof seam caps). Train Miniature had some cars with these roofs, but they are unusually narrow.

Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

Eric Hansmann
 

I see a 13 in the weigh date stencil area of the LVAN panel.

 

Intercolonial was folded into the Canadian National in 1918.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 3:06 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

 

Hi Bob and List Members,

 

A wonderful photo of a PRR class GR composite gon. Note this car class was built with drop ends, and the dropped end nearest the camera does not look too good! Still lettered in early style center bar lettering, and also archbar trucks. Note the outside stake pockets, some of which were recently in use by all appearances.

 

Undated image, but perhaps an automobile historian could tell us something about the date based in the lovely vehicle in the background.

 

Note that the dimensional lumber at the lumberyard (at right) was stacked before the common use of forklifts - there are no spacers in the stacks of lumber to use as an entry point for the fork.

 

The string of mostly 36ft cars in the background is fun to look at as well! The obligatory NP boxcar is indeed present. I note the INTERCOLONIAL boxcar on the left, when did that lettering go away?

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 

----- Original Message -----

Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 1:28 PM

Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

 

Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

A photo from the Detroit Public Library:

https://digitalcollections.detroitpubliclibrary.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A160440

Click and hold to enlarge photo.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 


Hi Bob and List Members,
 
A wonderful photo of a PRR class GR composite gon. Note this car class was built with drop ends, and the dropped end nearest the camera does not look too good! Still lettered in early style center bar lettering, and also archbar trucks. Note the outside stake pockets, some of which were recently in use by all appearances.
 
Undated image, but perhaps an automobile historian could tell us something about the date based in the lovely vehicle in the background.
 
Note that the dimensional lumber at the lumberyard (at right) was stacked before the common use of forklifts - there are no spacers in the stacks of lumber to use as an entry point for the fork.
 
The string of mostly 36ft cars in the background is fun to look at as well! The obligatory NP boxcar is indeed present. I note the INTERCOLONIAL boxcar on the left, when did that lettering go away?
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 1:28 PM
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

Photo: PRR Gondola 350115 (Undated)

A photo from the Detroit Public Library:

https://digitalcollections.detroitpubliclibrary.org/islandora/object/islandora%3A160440

Click and hold to enlarge photo.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Accurail 4300: CB&Q 15000-15499 or C&S 13500 series

O Fenton Wells
 

Looking good Rene' nice looking model
Fenton

On Mon, Sep 21, 2020 at 2:43 PM Rene LaVoise <rlavoise@...> wrote:
Robert,

I just finished applying the decals on my build of C&S 13571 last week. Haven’t yet applied flat coat or any weathering yet. 

On the ends I removed the inboard ladder stile except for the middle part spanning the two end sections. 
--
René LaVoise
Kirkwood, MO



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Accurail 4300: CB&Q 15000-15499 or C&S 13500 series

O Fenton Wells
 

Really nicely done Nelson, looks great
Fenton

On Mon, Sep 21, 2020 at 3:51 PM Nelson Moyer <npmoyer@...> wrote:

Beautiful build. The Accurail car body is very close to the original Speedwitch kit, except the Accurail body has the wood grain detail. The minor differences between the prototype and the Accurail body are in the door stops. The CB&Q removed the horizontal door brace when they added the slogan, and they added the top triangular reinforcement plates for the Z-bars about that time. I build the Sunshine kit as an XM-26, which is virtually identical to the XM-25, and the photo is attached for comparison with the Accurail body. Ted now offers an improved version of the Speedwitch kit, and I have two of them still in the boxes. They include the wood grain detail and other improvements.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Rene LaVoise
Sent: Monday, September 21, 2020 8:54 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Accurail 4300: CB&Q 15000-15499 or C&S 13500 series

 

Sorry, hit Send before attaching photos. 
--
René LaVoise
Kirkwood, MO

 



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...

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