Date   

Re: Pinned together

Dave Parker
 

I think what is "unusual" about this car is that it is about the earliest example of an AC&F insulated car that I have seen.  In my collection, most/all of the TMI cars from AC&F start appearing in the mid-1920s and, by then, they had rather "smooth" jackets covering the insulating layer.  This car just reflects early days in their construction of TMI cars.  Otherwise it is -- I'm never quite sure what to call it -- just an ACF Type 17 or maybe 19, i.e., the old Type 11 frame with an MCB class III tank on top.

BTW, the KD brakes were standard on AC&F cars built from ca. 1919 to 1921.  And, no, this was not a buyer's specification, this is how AC&F built all of their tank cars during this period.

--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Pinned together

Tony Thompson
 

Ken Akerboom wrote:

Are you talking about the horizontal "lines" just be low the car numbers, extending the length of the car?
Looks to me like an insulated tank, and the 2 pieces of jacket have angle irons attached, with bolts between them to draw the jacket tight?

Ken is exactly right. And these details are almost certainly a buyer specification, not a builder standard.

Tony Thompson




Re: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] PRR class H21 hopper and a UNION RAILROAD H21 style hopper with coke rack extensions

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Guys;

 

That is NOT a Pgh-area steel mill.  They had no blast furnace complexes that looked like that.

 

Jack Consoli made a compelling argument for Steelton-Highspire near Harrisburg, and I have to agree.

 

The give-aways are the layout of the furnaces, the stoves, and the big stacks.  The canal is the icing on the cake.

 

He also doesn’t think the coke car is URR, but my eyes are too poor to see the lettering.

 

Can anyone ID the other cars?

 

Elden Gatwood

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 3:07 PM
To: STMFC <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io>
Subject: [Non-DoD Source] [RealSTMFC] PRR class H21 hopper and a UNION RAILROAD H21 style hopper with coke rack extensions

 

Hi List Members,

 

View of a Pittsburgh PA steel mill.

 

Identifiable cars are a PRR class H21 hopper in circle-Keystone paint and lettering, and a UNION RAILROAD H21 style hopper with coke rack extensions.

 

 

More info at the link below...

 

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schlund

 

 

 

 


Re: Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

John Mateyko
 
Edited

Ralph,  With all due respect I am pretty sure when the item in questioned is ordered, it is referred to as rope.  Once on board, spliced per custom of the vessel and put to use it is then referred to as a specific line.  The same piece of 8" rope could be used once as a bow line, the next time as a spring line, another time as a breast line and another as a stern line.  When the captain orders. "Single up all lines" all lines which have been doubled up have one of those lines brought aboard.  When the captain orders, "Take in the stern breast line" every crew member in the docking/undocking party knows which specific line that is.  After leaving the dock/pier/wharf the chief mate will pass the order to stow all lines(they are still on deck in their most recently used area) into the Rope Locker, the lines are put into the rope locker.  The last one in may have been used as the stern line.  The next time, it would be the first piece out and more than likely will become either the forward line or the forward breast line.
By the way sir, how many years did you serve aboard a big ship's deck department?
Respectfully,
John Mateyko


Re: Pinned together

akerboomk
 

Are you talking about the horizontal "lines" just be low the car numbers, extending the length of the car?
Looks to me like an insulated tank, and the 2 pieces of jacket have angle irons attached, with bolts between them to draw the jacket tight?
--
Ken Akerboom


Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] REDEMPTION

gtws00
 

Schuler,
I grabbed this copy of the Ultimate thinning guide from their website. The attached one is a bit larger in size and a bit easier to read.
Also here is there website if you care to see it online. They have many nice products, but hard to get with Covid around as shipping is very costly direct from them

Tutorials | Ultimate Modelling Products (umpretail.com)

Ultimate_Thinner_Chart_V1.2_19c16a42-89ef-4218-b13c-e520698b1e02.webp (724×1024)

I use mostly Acrylics now and avoid lacquerer paints not because I don't like them but because I cannot tolerate them even with the use of a vented spray booth. 

Hope this helps
George Toman
Willow Springs, IL


Re: Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

akerboomk
 

Although I agree it is probably in captive use (due to all the other reasons mentioned), just because the load has not been secured is (to me) not the reason (or not sufficient reason).

The photographer *could* have caught the car in “we loaded the car but haven’t secured it for shipping yet” state.


--
Ken Akerboom


Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] REDEMPTION

O Fenton Wells
 

Thanks Ike
Fenton

On Fri, Mar 26, 2021 at 3:45 PM George Eichelberger <geichelberger@...> wrote:
The full size tiffs of the ’41 “Freight Car Situation” are on Google Drive at...


Ike



--
Fenton Wells
250 Frye Rd
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-8106
srrfan1401@...


Re: Pinned together

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Pinned?  As opposed to riveted?  Not sure what you are saying here.

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 3:35 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] Pinned together

 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/37711713434/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

On Flicker, a Magnolia tankcar from 1919.  It looks like it has been pinned together.  I don’t recall seeing this before.  And the dimensions remind me of something Chicago Tankcar would build, not AC&F.

 

Comments?

 

Dave Nelson


Re: Vallejo paint

Bill McClure
 

Really. I have been doing this for more than 60 years with every available paint, and have found that nothing weathers models as nicely as Vallejo.

I also use both SC paints and have found that putting SC thinner in a cup with paint is no bother or aggravation.

If you're happy with what you use, keep on keepin' on. 

Bill


Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] REDEMPTION

George Eichelberger
 

The full size tiffs of the ’41 “Freight Car Situation” are on Google Drive at...


Ike


Image of CRL 1097 reefer CUDAHY REFRIGERATOR LINE

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Image of CRL 1097 reefer CUDAHY REFRIGERATOR LINE
 
 
More info at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 


Pinned together

Dave Nelson
 

https://www.flickr.com/photos/barrigerlibrary/37711713434/in/album-72157649155982802/

 

On Flicker, a Magnolia tankcar from 1919.  It looks like it has been pinned together.  I don’t recall seeing this before.  And the dimensions remind me of something Chicago Tankcar would build, not AC&F.

 

Comments?

 

Dave Nelson


Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] REDEMPTION

Schuyler Larrabee
 

George, any chance of sharing this as a true “attachment” so it could be opened at a size where it’s legible?

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of George Eichelberger
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 9:51 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [EXT] [RealSTMFC] REDEMPTION

 

Bruce is certainly correct! The PRR had 227,881 freight cars service in 1942 (see attached for all railroads from the SRHA archives), no other road comes close. PRR cars would have been everywhere.

 

Ike

 

 


Re: Vallejo paint

O Fenton Wells
 

After reading all this I’m in agreement with you Schuyler 
Fenton 


On Mar 26, 2021, at 3:16 PM, Schuyler Larrabee via groups.io <schuyler.larrabee@...> wrote:



OK, I have to say that a paint that requires as many posts as Vallejo seems to just strengthens my opinion that anything other than Scalecoat, either 1 or 2, is a waste of time and a source of aggravation.  “Just sayin,” as Fenton would say.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Vallejo paint

 

I’ll add a couple of minor thoughts: 

- Vallejo says it can be mixed by rolling the bottle back and forth between the palms for at least 60 seconds.  I find this quick and easy. 

- I usually put the paint into a small bottle or dish, add a bit of air brush thinner.  Doing it this way, you can see if a bottle has gone bad (rare) before it goes in the airbrush cup.

- I pour into the cup, do a test pattern, and spray at about 15 pounds of pressure (a tip from the internet).  

- I have a 3 gallon bucket of water with dish soap standing buy.  If I mess up, the model goes into the water immediately.  I also use the bucket to clean the airbrush.

- I spray more air brush cleaner through to do a final clean up.  If it is stubborn, a bit of alcohol in the cup and sprayed through will clean it up.  Isopropyl is not good for the gaskets in the airbrush, etc, but I use it in a pinch.  I’ll occasionally disassemble and use isopropyl to clean parts that have dried on paint.   

 

For brush painting, wow, is this stuff forgiving.  I dip the paint brush in airbrush thinner to moisten (not soak) it a bit before painting.  Makes clean up easier later on.  I usually mix a few drops on a bit of plastic or tin foil, and brush it on the model.  A small puddle goes a long way.  Running out has never been a problem; just mix some more and brush it on.  The overlap?  Well, it's invisible to my eye.  So easy makes me wonder why I bother with the airbrush.  But the airbrush gives a thinner coat.

 

Down side: it turns to stretchy rubber if you apply a wash thinned with turpentine.  That was a bad day!

 

Rob

 

On Mar 25, 2021, at 2:54 PM, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

 

Clark never mix in the paint cup as paint goes around needle and that does not mix well with paint and thinner added above.  Always mix in another container - I use a large measuring spoon.  There are two Vallejo paint  types: Model Air ready for spraying which I find rare ( I have spayed only a few times with paint directly from the bottle) and Model Color for brushing that always must be thinned.  Before any thinning I remove eye dropper bottle top which does come out of bottle and stir paint inside bottle and reinsert eyedropper top.   thinning:  I mix all paint for the airbrush in a large measuring spoon.  Normally 30 to 40 drops of paint.  The beauty of the eye drop top.  Thinner: Model Air due to bottle sitting on shelf for a period of time may need to be thinned when opened so start with maybe 10 drops of thinner and work up 5 drops at a time. You should have a milk viscosity for spraying.  I use a piece of rail to stir the paint and thinner in the measuring spoon.  If I turn the rail after stirring vertical and the paint on the rail forms a drop and drips off paint is ready.  For Model Color I start with the same number of 30 to 40 drops of paint.  I start with half the number of drops, 15 or 20 of thinner and work up - again five drops at a time.  Again, when drop falls off rail used for mixing thinned paint ready for spraying.  On Model Color at times I will need and work up to the same amount of drops, 30 to 40 to get viscosity of thinner and paint correct.  Sounds like a lot of tedious time spent mixing; however, soon second nature and you will be able to mix at light speed as you building speed.

And, one key to Vallejo paint and thinner spray mix is needle size and air pressure.  The larger the needle size the better and air pressure 24 lbs or lower.  BTW when I started with water base paint I started with the Paasche H.   Now Passache Talon with #3 needle or Badger Patriot which has only one needle size.

Lester Breuer

 


1968 image of Fort Dodge Des Moines & Southern Box Car Sarasota FL

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
1968 image of Fort Dodge Des Moines & Southern Box Car Sarasota FL
 
 
More info at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 


Re: Vallejo paint

Schuyler Larrabee
 

OK, I have to say that a paint that requires as many posts as Vallejo seems to just strengthens my opinion that anything other than Scalecoat, either 1 or 2, is a waste of time and a source of aggravation.  “Just sayin,” as Fenton would say.

 

Schuyler

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Robert kirkham
Sent: Friday, March 26, 2021 1:55 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Vallejo paint

 

I’ll add a couple of minor thoughts: 

- Vallejo says it can be mixed by rolling the bottle back and forth between the palms for at least 60 seconds.  I find this quick and easy. 

- I usually put the paint into a small bottle or dish, add a bit of air brush thinner.  Doing it this way, you can see if a bottle has gone bad (rare) before it goes in the airbrush cup.

- I pour into the cup, do a test pattern, and spray at about 15 pounds of pressure (a tip from the internet).  

- I have a 3 gallon bucket of water with dish soap standing buy.  If I mess up, the model goes into the water immediately.  I also use the bucket to clean the airbrush.

- I spray more air brush cleaner through to do a final clean up.  If it is stubborn, a bit of alcohol in the cup and sprayed through will clean it up.  Isopropyl is not good for the gaskets in the airbrush, etc, but I use it in a pinch.  I’ll occasionally disassemble and use isopropyl to clean parts that have dried on paint.   

 

For brush painting, wow, is this stuff forgiving.  I dip the paint brush in airbrush thinner to moisten (not soak) it a bit before painting.  Makes clean up easier later on.  I usually mix a few drops on a bit of plastic or tin foil, and brush it on the model.  A small puddle goes a long way.  Running out has never been a problem; just mix some more and brush it on.  The overlap?  Well, it's invisible to my eye.  So easy makes me wonder why I bother with the airbrush.  But the airbrush gives a thinner coat.

 

Down side: it turns to stretchy rubber if you apply a wash thinned with turpentine.  That was a bad day!

 

Rob

 

On Mar 25, 2021, at 2:54 PM, Lester Breuer <rforailroad@...> wrote:

 

Clark never mix in the paint cup as paint goes around needle and that does not mix well with paint and thinner added above.  Always mix in another container - I use a large measuring spoon.  There are two Vallejo paint  types: Model Air ready for spraying which I find rare ( I have spayed only a few times with paint directly from the bottle) and Model Color for brushing that always must be thinned.  Before any thinning I remove eye dropper bottle top which does come out of bottle and stir paint inside bottle and reinsert eyedropper top.   thinning:  I mix all paint for the airbrush in a large measuring spoon.  Normally 30 to 40 drops of paint.  The beauty of the eye drop top.  Thinner: Model Air due to bottle sitting on shelf for a period of time may need to be thinned when opened so start with maybe 10 drops of thinner and work up 5 drops at a time. You should have a milk viscosity for spraying.  I use a piece of rail to stir the paint and thinner in the measuring spoon.  If I turn the rail after stirring vertical and the paint on the rail forms a drop and drips off paint is ready.  For Model Color I start with the same number of 30 to 40 drops of paint.  I start with half the number of drops, 15 or 20 of thinner and work up - again five drops at a time.  Again, when drop falls off rail used for mixing thinned paint ready for spraying.  On Model Color at times I will need and work up to the same amount of drops, 30 to 40 to get viscosity of thinner and paint correct.  Sounds like a lot of tedious time spent mixing; however, soon second nature and you will be able to mix at light speed as you building speed.

And, one key to Vallejo paint and thinner spray mix is needle size and air pressure.  The larger the needle size the better and air pressure 24 lbs or lower.  BTW when I started with water base paint I started with the Paasche H.   Now Passache Talon with #3 needle or Badger Patriot which has only one needle size.

Lester Breuer

 


PRR class H21 hopper and a UNION RAILROAD H21 style hopper with coke rack extensions

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
View of a Pittsburgh PA steel mill.
 
Identifiable cars are a PRR class H21 hopper in circle-Keystone paint and lettering, and a UNION RAILROAD H21 style hopper with coke rack extensions.
 
 
More info at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 


Sep 1937 image of CCC&StL Box #59298 Zanesville OH

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Sep 1937 image of CCC&StL Box #59298 Zanesville OH
 
 
More info at the link below...
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 
 
 
 


Re: Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: Flatcar With Rope Load
A phot from the Digital Commonwealth website:
Click on the photo and scroll to enlarge the photo.
Undated. No ownership indicated on the flatcar.
Perhaps in captive service at the port?

Seems likely. This cannot have moved any substantial distance with the rolls of rope just lying on the flat car.

Tony Thompson



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