Date   
New resin freight car kits

Eric Hansmann
 

A couple new Resin Car Works HO scale kits will be introduced at RPM Chicagoland. Details are in the latest blog post!



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy

Re: ADHESIVE PROBLEM

Donald B. Valentine
 

    I'd have to agree Tim, I've never found a use for Tenax and after several tries over the years
with different bottles of it put it in the trash as useless/.

Cordially, Don Valentine

Re: Photos: Loaded Automobile Boxcar Interior

Tony Thompson
 

Remember that auto shipping by rail steadily shrank through the 50s, down to barely 10 percent of all shipments, until the introduction of auto racks in late 50s.
Tony Thompson 


On Oct 19, 2019, at 9:58 AM, Garth Groff <sarahsan@...> wrote:

 Tom and Guy,

Somewhere I've seen a photo taken in the 1950s of used cars being delivered to a team track for a small local auto dealer, I think on the C&O. The cars shipped were in a double-door boxcar without auto racks, or the racks were not used if present. I'm sure this was no longer done for new cars shipped by the major manufacturers, but non-rack shipping was apparently still possible.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 10/18/2019 10:37 PM, Guy Wilber via Groups.Io wrote:

Tom in Texas asked:

“When would they have quit loading cars in box cars this way?”

Tom,

The caption states these photos were taken in 1932.  Within a year Evans would introduce ‘The Auto~Loader’ and NYC followed closely thereafter with their own permanently mounted racking system.  Installation of these loading systems would eventually supplant the larger percentage of such methods used for tilting and decking vehicles within auto cars.  The transition was rapid with 34,973 auto cars equipped with loaders by September of 1937.

Despite the totals of cars equipped, the original Evans racks (A and B) could not accommodate smaller trucks such as these GMC models, or some larger automobile models.  Dual wheels and longer chassis made loading onto the racks nearly impossible.  Many railroads owning auto cars did modify the racks to appease the auto industry.  Evans would later (9-‘37) introduce racks with wider wheel pans and sliding frame components allowing multiple adjustments to accommodate larger automobiles and light trucks.   The same early restrictions held true for The NYC design; that, and the fact that manufacturers did not like their “tire chain” tie downs is likely why the road eventually purchased Evans loaders exclusively.

It would be hard to answer your question precisely, but I would guess it would be somewhat rare to see automobiles or light trucks loaded by these methods much past the 1937-38 model years.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada





Re: Photos: Loaded Automobile Boxcar Interior

Garth Groff <sarahsan@...>
 

Tom and Guy,

Somewhere I've seen a photo taken in the 1950s of used cars being delivered to a team track for a small local auto dealer, I think on the C&O. The cars shipped were in a double-door boxcar without auto racks, or the racks were not used if present. I'm sure this was no longer done for new cars shipped by the major manufacturers, but non-rack shipping was apparently still possible.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff

On 10/18/2019 10:37 PM, Guy Wilber via Groups.Io wrote:

Tom in Texas asked:

“When would they have quit loading cars in box cars this way?”

Tom,

The caption states these photos were taken in 1932.  Within a year Evans would introduce ‘The Auto~Loader’ and NYC followed closely thereafter with their own permanently mounted racking system.  Installation of these loading systems would eventually supplant the larger percentage of such methods used for tilting and decking vehicles within auto cars.  The transition was rapid with 34,973 auto cars equipped with loaders by September of 1937.

Despite the totals of cars equipped, the original Evans racks (A and B) could not accommodate smaller trucks such as these GMC models, or some larger automobile models.  Dual wheels and longer chassis made loading onto the racks nearly impossible.  Many railroads owning auto cars did modify the racks to appease the auto industry.  Evans would later (9-‘37) introduce racks with wider wheel pans and sliding frame components allowing multiple adjustments to accommodate larger automobiles and light trucks.   The same early restrictions held true for The NYC design; that, and the fact that manufacturers did not like their “tire chain” tie downs is likely why the road eventually purchased Evans loaders exclusively.

It would be hard to answer your question precisely, but I would guess it would be somewhat rare to see automobiles or light trucks loaded by these methods much past the 1937-38 model years.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada





Re: Precision Scale retainer valve

Fred Jansz
 

Thanks all for good advise.
best regards,
Fred Jansz

Re: Photos: Loaded Automobile Boxcar Interior

Guy Wilber
 


Tom in Texas asked:

“When would they have quit loading cars in box cars this way?”

Tom,

The caption states these photos were taken in 1932. Within a year Evans would introduce ‘The Auto~Loader’ and NYC followed closely thereafter with their own permanently mounted racking system. Installation of these loading systems would eventually supplant the larger percentage of such methods used for tilting and decking vehicles within auto cars. The transition was rapid with 34,973 auto cars equipped with loaders by September of 1937.

Despite the totals of cars equipped, the original Evans racks (A and B) could not accommodate smaller trucks such as these GMC models, or some larger automobile models. Dual wheels and longer chassis made loading onto the racks nearly impossible. Many railroads owning auto cars did modify the racks to appease the auto industry. Evans would later (9-‘37) introduce racks with wider wheel pans and sliding frame components allowing multiple adjustments to accommodate larger automobiles and light trucks. The same early restrictions held true for The NYC design; that, and the fact that manufacturers did not like their “tire chain” tie downs is likely why the road eventually purchased Evans loaders exclusively.

It would be hard to answer your question precisely, but I would guess it would be somewhat rare to see automobiles or light trucks loaded by these methods much past the 1937-38 model years.

Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

Re: Precision Scale retainer valve

Nelson Moyer
 

Bill makes a valid point about drilling on the sprue, and that’s the way I do it as well. I use a #79 bit for the wire, and there is a molded dimple on the retainer valve to help you start the bit. Bill’s comment about the #77 bit is for the mounting stub, i.e. drill that hole in the car body at the location where you want to place the retainer valve.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Bill Welch
Sent: Friday, October 18, 2019 5:53 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Precision Scale retainer valve

 

These are very small. I leave a small section of sprue on to help me handle it, then trim it off after glue has cured. Needs a #77 hole for mounting on an end in my experience.

Bill Welch

 


Scanned by McAfee and confirmed virus-free.

 

Re: ADHESIVE PROBLEM

Tim O'Connor
 

I don't understand this - I've never had much luck with Tenax (methylene chloride) with ABS parts
especially the old Plastruct stuff. ABS is NOT an acrylic material.

On 10/18/2019 6:11 PM, John Sykes III via Groups.Io wrote:
If you think the plastic is ABS, methylene chloride should work fine.  If it is a plastic more like delrin, I would suggest the primer-glue combination of LocTite 770 primer and 401 cyanoacrylic cement.  The primer gives the delrin a chemical level "tooth" that allows the CA to grab, so it only needs to go on the delrin part.  I've used it to glue broken delrin trucks and similar parts together.

--John
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Re: Precision Scale retainer valve

Bill Welch
 

These are very small. I leave a small section of sprue on to help me handle it, then trim it off after glue has cured. Needs a #77 hole for mounting on an end in my experience.

Bill Welch

Re: ADHESIVE PROBLEM

John Sykes III
 

If you think the plastic is ABS, methylene chloride should work fine.  If it is a plastic more like delrin, I would suggest the primer-glue combination of LocTite 770 primer and 401 cyanoacrylic cement.  The primer gives the delrin a chemical level "tooth" that allows the CA to grab, so it only needs to go on the delrin part.  I've used it to glue broken delrin trucks and similar parts together.

--John

Re: Photos: Loaded Automobile Boxcar Interior

Jack Mullen
 

On Fri, Oct 18, 2019 at 02:45 PM, al.kresse wrote:
No photo shows up
The photos are those linked in the original post from Bob Chaparro, to which I was responding. I'm discussing the hardware that Bob called attention to.
Sorry that I wasn't clearer.  It's easy to forget that these message forums aren't quite like an actual conversation. Chaos ensues.

Jack

Re: Precision Scale retainer valve

O Fenton Wells
 

I use the plastic ones. 
Enjoy 
Fenton 


On Oct 18, 2019, at 5:40 PM, Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:

Thank you Fenton!
regards
Fred Jansz

Re: Photos: Loaded Automobile Boxcar Interior

al.kresse
 

No photo shows up

On October 18, 2019 at 5:15 PM Jack Mullen <jack.f.mullen@...> wrote:

This shows the way it was done before development of Evans loaders . One end of the vehicle is lifted, with wheels removed, and the axle is supported with wooden A-frames. Wood blocking and wire tie-downs are used to prevent shifting.

At first I thought the load was three GM trucks, but there's another tall A-frame in the background, indicating that an  unseen fourth truck is loaded in the rear of the car, with its hood to the B end, and the rear elevated above the  chassis of the next which faces the camera.

Jack Mullen

 

Re: Precision Scale retainer valve

Fred Jansz
 
Edited

Good one Nelson, that crossed my mind too.
regards,
Fred Jansz

Re: Precision Scale retainer valve

Fred Jansz
 

Thank you Fenton!
regards
Fred Jansz

Re: Photos: Loaded Automobile Boxcar Interior

Jack Mullen
 

This shows the way it was done before development of Evans loaders . One end of the vehicle is lifted, with wheels removed, and the axle is supported with wooden A-frames. Wood blocking and wire tie-downs are used to prevent shifting.

At first I thought the load was three GM trucks, but there's another tall A-frame in the background, indicating that an  unseen fourth truck is loaded in the rear of the car, with its hood to the B end, and the rear elevated above the  chassis of the next which faces the camera.

Jack Mullen

Re: Valuation Listing for ICC for Pere Marquette Rwy

al.kresse
 

Years ago, somebody on this list shared with me an ICC Valuation report for the C&O and PM listing all the freight cars and cabooses with there depreciated values. I can't seem to Key Word search for it. Can you contact if you have it?

I am looking at the PM's Wooden Cabooses for an article but there is VERY LITTLE documentation on them . . . A200, A300, A400, A500 and A600 series split up into series of 10 or 25, etc. Only the A800-824 series is well documented.

Thanks in advance,

Al Kresse

Re: Photos: Loaded Automobile Boxcar Interior

Tom in Texas
 

When would they have quit loading cars in box cars this way?

Tom in Texas

Re: ADHESIVE PROBLEM

Tim O'Connor
 

If Plastruct's ABS liquid cement does not work, I'd simply use contact cement. Any brand
(Barge, et al) You can dilute the solvent based contact cements with straight MEK - it becomes
less stringy and you can dab it on with disposable microbrushes. Let it dry on both pieces
and voila, instant permanent bond.

On 10/17/2019 5:08 PM, WILLIAM PARDIE wrote:

I am probably stretching the limits of this group but do not caboose come under freight cars?  To push things further I am completing the conversion of a Harriman Southern Pacific coach to a caboose.

I have encountered a problem with the American Limited diaphrams.  I have used their gray diaphrams in the past with great success.  First this project I have black units.  The plastic parts seem th be a very slick plastic that is resistant to Testors liquid plastic cement.  Has anyone has a similar experience and what was the solution?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Hope to see many of you in Lysle.

Bill Pardie
--
*Tim O'Connor*
*Sterling, Massachusetts*

Photos: Loaded Automobile Boxcar Interior

Bob Chaparro