Date   
Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

Richard Wilkens
 

Here is a very early photo of SP&S 10092 C.T., probably shortly after being built.

Rich Wilkens

SP&S Freight Cars from Salvaged Freight Cars

Richard Wilkens
 

Here is a list of the foreign road cars that were wrecked on the SP&S and were salvaged and rebuilt for maintenance of way and commercial service. This list does not include the hundreds of freight cars purchased from parent roads GN & NP as well as the hundreds of second hand drop bottom gondolas purchased to be converted to woodchip cars.

Rich Wilkens

B&A 39280 to SP&S X-303 (Box car used as cable car) MOW, AFE 7647, October 1945

C&NW 122524 to SP&S X-285 (Outfit box car) MOW, AFE 7690, October 1945

CB&Q 44351 to SP&S X-144 (Box car water service), MOW, AFE 5951, July 1935

D&H 23754 to SP&S X-14 (Outfit box car) MOW, AFE 7270, December 1943

FGE 31660 to SP&S X-357 (Ice car, end bunkers removed), MOW, AFE 7617, June 1945

GN 65059 to SP&S X-146 (Flat car, GN car wrecked at North Bonneville, WA) MOW, AFE 6457, December 1938

N&W 84300 to SP&S X-356 (Ice car, end bunkers removed), MOW, AFE 7617, June 1945

NP 13815 to SP&S X-12 (Outfit flat car), MOW, AFE 7166, June 1943

NP 39762 to X-300 (Outfit box car), MOW, AFE 7028, December 1941

NP 44264 to X-9 (Idler car for wrecker), MOW, AFE 3920, September 1923

NP 69880 to SP&S X-6 (Flat car), MOW, AFE 4480, February 1926

NYNH&H 79835 to SP&S X-25 (Flat car), MOW, AFE 3131, April 1920

CRI&P 62119 to SP&S X-124 (Cook and dining car, RI car destroyed by fire at Vancouver, WA March 6, 1926), MOW, AFE 4617, June 1926

SDRX 6112 to SP&S X-84 (Water tank car), MOW, AFE 7592, August 1945

SDRX 6151 to SP&S X-85 (Water tank car), MOW, AFE 7592, August 1945

SLSF 147645 to SP&S X-86 (Flat car fitted with old 4,000 gal. tender oil cistern and used to hold water), MOW, AFE 7573, April 1945

SP 24332 (Box) to SP&S X-111 (Outfit flat car, mounting car for crane X-37) MOW, AFE 6893, August 1941

UP 13500 (Box) to SP&S 32003 (Flat car built from salvage of UP 13500 destroyed by fire at Amber, WA on September 1, 1916), Commercial service (later to MOW X-29), AFE 1665, February 1917

Re: Utah Coal Route steel gons in log service

Tony Thompson
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:


They look like Lodgepole pine logs. The Lodgepole grows like a weed in the northwestern
states and forms dense stands. It's not a Douglas Fir or one of the mighty Spruce trees
from the Olympic Peninsula (that grew well over 300 feet tall) or even Ponderosa pine,
but not all lumber needs to be high quality. :-)

      Tim has (probably unintentionally) garbled his statement a little. The 300-ft. trees on the Olympic Peninsula are Douglas fir, not spruce (for record spruce trees, visit Vancouver Island). Lodgepoles 100 feet tall would be a VERY tall tree of that species. As I said, this doesn't CONTRADICT what Tim said, hopefully clarifies it.

Tony Thompson



Re: Photo: Poultry Car

Lester Breuer
 

Bob thanks for sharing. Interesting photo.

First photo I have seen with the what I am guessing is the door to the center aisle out of the car attendant’s quarters or is it the side of the cages?

Lester Breuer

Re: June 1941. "Railroad yards. Milwaukee, WI

John Larkin
 

That shot highlights 3 Milwaukee boxcars with 3 different paint schemes.  I'm not a Milwaukee expert by any means but the cars appear to be built to the same plan.  That's one of the best pix I've ever seen illustrating how paint schemes can vary on what appears to be identical cars.

John Larkin

On Sunday, April 12, 2020, 12:09:21 PM CDT, Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...> wrote:


Re: FSA/OWI photos - Omaha 1938, 1941

John Larkin
 

Next to last photo was on e-bay for a while a couple of months ago.  I'm not sure whose station is shown there but multiple railroads ran through here.  I'm going to have to dig out my old Omaha map to be accurate.

John Larkin

On Sunday, April 12, 2020, 12:19:28 PM CDT, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:


In the fifth picture, I have doubts about it being a pickle car.
It certainly looks similar to a pickle car but all pickle cars I have seen
images of were owned by a pickle packing company.
This car has Kansas City Southern on it.  What else could it be hauling?
I have no idea. Something briny or acidic, it would seem.
Could KCS have a car they leased to a pickle producer?  A partial number
might end in 24.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 1:04 PM Paul Krueger <kruegerp12@...> wrote:
I was looking at photos on the Library of Congress website and found these from Omaha with freight cars. Most were taken November 1938, but I think one is from 1941.

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA

Unloading 'coal' (looks like cinders or gravel to me) - MP USRA gondola

Union Stock Yards - boxcars in the background

Grain elevators - CGW boxcars in the midground, SAL box in the background, and what is that on the side of the boxcar behind the RI locomotive in the foreground?

CGW boxcar close-up (too bad the photographer wasn't back a foot or so)

American Smelting and Refining - nice cut of freight cars across the middle of the photo, is that a pickle car in the middle? Two rail cranes in the photo too.

Another view of American Smelting, but the freight cars are more distant

Unloading sheep at the stock yards - MILW stock car being unloaded, Quaker City Live Stock Express stock car in the background with part of a RI stock car.

Close-up of sheep being loaded into a stock car
 
Stock yards - decent view of ARLX 11801 on the right

Omaha rail yard - good views of roofs and ends

Omaha elevated view - some freight cars in the lower left corner


Re: FSA/OWI photos - Omaha 1938, 1941

John Larkin
 

The first picture may likely be cinders used for fill.  Many years ago when UP built the cut-off through Omaha (bypassing the original line south of there) they built massive trestles.  These were filled in by dumping fill over until today's mainline was finished - this was quite a fill and required lots of material and dumping cinders was a very good way to get rid of them and fill in the trestles at the same time.  

If you ever pass through Omaha on I-80 the fill is very evident and extends for about 3+ miles.  Except for the lighting (I-80 is north of the railroad) it would be a great photo place.

John Larkin


On Sunday, April 12, 2020, 12:19:28 PM CDT, Charles Peck <lnnrr152@...> wrote:


In the fifth picture, I have doubts about it being a pickle car.
It certainly looks similar to a pickle car but all pickle cars I have seen
images of were owned by a pickle packing company.
This car has Kansas City Southern on it.  What else could it be hauling?
I have no idea. Something briny or acidic, it would seem.
Could KCS have a car they leased to a pickle producer?  A partial number
might end in 24.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 1:04 PM Paul Krueger <kruegerp12@...> wrote:
I was looking at photos on the Library of Congress website and found these from Omaha with freight cars. Most were taken November 1938, but I think one is from 1941.

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA

Unloading 'coal' (looks like cinders or gravel to me) - MP USRA gondola

Union Stock Yards - boxcars in the background

Grain elevators - CGW boxcars in the midground, SAL box in the background, and what is that on the side of the boxcar behind the RI locomotive in the foreground?

CGW boxcar close-up (too bad the photographer wasn't back a foot or so)

American Smelting and Refining - nice cut of freight cars across the middle of the photo, is that a pickle car in the middle? Two rail cranes in the photo too.

Another view of American Smelting, but the freight cars are more distant

Unloading sheep at the stock yards - MILW stock car being unloaded, Quaker City Live Stock Express stock car in the background with part of a RI stock car.

Close-up of sheep being loaded into a stock car
 
Stock yards - decent view of ARLX 11801 on the right

Omaha rail yard - good views of roofs and ends

Omaha elevated view - some freight cars in the lower left corner


Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

Donald B. Valentine
 

     I've yet to see eave boards on a "as built", Bill. Can you provide photos of any "as builts" with
them on the car? Can they not be added quite easily with a piece of Evergreen strip? I'm picky ,
too, but when a product is offered the way the original version was built and it is advertized in this 
case as as a USRA Double Sheathed, NOT as a MODIFIED USRA double sheathed, how can I 
complain? I still prefer the Ertl model as they are usually three for the price of one new Rapido
and I still feel that operating doors on injection molded box car models in HO scale ought to br
mandatory but that's my gripe, not everyone elses! Just saw too many empties rolling even into
the 1980's with their doors wide open and still vividly remember passing a northbound freight
paralleling I-5 somewhere north of Fresno in Aug. 1982 with three kids sitting in a boxcar with 
their feet hanging out and a dog sitting there with them. How are you going to model that in any 
time period if the darn door won't open???

Happy Easter, Don Valentine

Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

Jack Mullen
 

Bill,
As-Built, the metal roofing just wraps over the top of the sides. No fascia. Presence of a fascia indicates a replacement roof, and at that point various owners' choices diverge, and other mods may also appear. 

Jack Mullen

Re: FSA/OWI photos - Omaha 1938, 1941

Charles Peck
 

In the fifth picture, I have doubts about it being a pickle car.
It certainly looks similar to a pickle car but all pickle cars I have seen
images of were owned by a pickle packing company.
This car has Kansas City Southern on it.  What else could it be hauling?
I have no idea. Something briny or acidic, it would seem.
Could KCS have a car they leased to a pickle producer?  A partial number
might end in 24.
Chuck Peck

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 1:04 PM Paul Krueger <kruegerp12@...> wrote:
I was looking at photos on the Library of Congress website and found these from Omaha with freight cars. Most were taken November 1938, but I think one is from 1941.

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA

Unloading 'coal' (looks like cinders or gravel to me) - MP USRA gondola

Union Stock Yards - boxcars in the background

Grain elevators - CGW boxcars in the midground, SAL box in the background, and what is that on the side of the boxcar behind the RI locomotive in the foreground?

CGW boxcar close-up (too bad the photographer wasn't back a foot or so)

American Smelting and Refining - nice cut of freight cars across the middle of the photo, is that a pickle car in the middle? Two rail cranes in the photo too.

Another view of American Smelting, but the freight cars are more distant

Unloading sheep at the stock yards - MILW stock car being unloaded, Quaker City Live Stock Express stock car in the background with part of a RI stock car.

Close-up of sheep being loaded into a stock car
 
Stock yards - decent view of ARLX 11801 on the right

Omaha rail yard - good views of roofs and ends

Omaha elevated view - some freight cars in the lower left corner


Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)

Mont Switzer
 

Back when I had more time than money I built my own spray painting booth.  That was over 40 years ago.  I took an end from a wooden wire reel abut 24 inches in diameter and cut it in half so I had a semi-circular top and bottom.  I made a back from sheet aluminum.  The booth is about 2 feet tall because this is how wide the aluminum was.  I braced the booth with 1 x 2 sofe pine and installed a bathroom fan in the back.  It pulls the air through two 20 x 20 furnace air filters.  I hooked a clothes drier hose to the fan outlet and ran it to a dryer outlet.  I used to hang the hose out the window when painting, but later replaced a basement window panel with aluminum and an exterior dryer outlet for a permanent and more suitable year round installation.  Then I installed a light bulb in the booth and have been using it ever since.   I set the booth on an old cabinet the correct height for standing at the booth.  The cabinet stores my painting jigs, holders and other painting supplies.

I use a small portable air supply with compressor and air reservoir like you buy at a farm and fleet store.  I built a quick disconnect brass manifold out of brass fittings so I can have two airbrushes connected to the compressor at the same time.  Of course the manifold is in line after the obligatory water trap and pressure adjustment valve.  I wired the paint booth to receive the air compressor electrical chord and work light so that with the flip of one switch the light and fan come on and other controls the air compressor.

All of this is in a small space just off of the laundry room shared by the electric water heater and south staging for the layout.

I used to paint a lot of brass for myself an others.  Some manufacturers used a clear coat to protect the brass.  Others just painted the model a brass color no doubt to hide some sloppy soldering.  As Tim O'Connor suggests, you can soak a lot of this over coating off with lacquer thinner, but it always seemed to require some hand work for a complete job.  I soon learned that the overcoats were usually pretty thin and even (Overland Models was great), and it held paint well.  I therefore began spraying over the clear coat unless it was exceptionally heavy.  I still used gray primer under red and lighter colors.  This worked fine when using lacquer based paint like Scalecoat 1.

I invested in a media blasting both for those situations where the clear coat or a failed pant application had to come off.   I bought my media blasting booth from a tool catalog; some assembly required.  I rigged it up for use with a cheap hobby media blasting airbrush like gun.  I have a second air compressor which lives in the garage so I rigged up with quick disconnect fittings so I could use it for other household tasks.  The booth lives on a wheeled cart in the garage.  I prefer to roll it outside when using it, weather permitting, even when using the booth.  Lacquer thinner first and tidy it up with the media blasting.  This also etches the surface slightly for paint adherence.     I recycle the media by using it over and over.  I have not bought any in years.  I'm always amazed how you can media blast paint and lettering off of a styrene model, but it has no affect on the details.  I've also undone some bad (overdone) weathering with this tool. 

I always made sure Mrs. Switzer had a state of the art electric oven in the kitchen.  I like freshly baked fruit pies.  This is also where I bake on the lacquer based paint applied to brass models.  I have my own set of hand-me-down cookie sheets for this process and have to make an appointment to use the oven.  Not trusting the thermostat of the oven(s) I pre-heat it to 150 degrees and then shut it off.  I then slide brass model on the cookie sheet in the oven and leave it for an hour.  The paint dries to a very hard finish.  When applying multiple color paint schemes the hard baked finish takes masking well.  Just remember, start with light colors and end with dark colors. 

I prefer to paint with lacquer based paints and weather with water or alcohol based medial and weathering powders.  Remember, one of the best ways to hide a bad paint job is weathering.  I've weathered my way out of more than one mess.

Lastly, don't scrimp where it comes to your personal Safety.   I have a good quality respirator and use it.  Plan B is a particle mask.  If you don't believe paint and blasting media can get into your lungs just blow your nose on a white tissue after you are done painting or blasting.  What you get will be the color of your project that day.    

Mont Switzer         

 


From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] on behalf of Nelson Moyer [npmoyer@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 11:27 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)

Yep, mass painting doesn’t work with that paint, though I once primed twelve stock cars in a makeshift cardboard paint booth in the garage. I still prime in the garage, but I do one car at a time using paint handles. I made four handles, so I can do four cars in a session. My paint booth is a fairly small Paasche, and using rattle cans really messes it up due to the wider pattern than an airbrush. Rather than cleaning the paint booth after every rattle car session, I wait for warm, dry day without too much wind (rare in Iowa), open the garage door, and set up a temporary bench of plywood on saw horses, and paint in the garage. Because Tamiya dries so fast, there isn’t any wet overspray except on the plywood, the rest is just powder as you’ve experienced. Of course I use a respirator and gloves, but because the garage door is open, and because Tamiya dries so fast, the fumes are mostly gone after 10-15 minutes.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 9:53 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)

 

Nelson

Ok, thanks! I may have been too far from the work. The paint I used is the
"fine surface primer". But I should say that the powder residue was all over
the booth but not on the model pieces - I was mass painting Athearn blue box
underframes. :-[



On 4/12/2020 9:49 AM, Nelson Moyer wrote:

Tim, you’re used the wrong primer. You need Tamiya FINE Light Gray Primer. Tamiya also makes a Light Gray Primer, and the cans look alike except for the word FINE. That makes all the difference in the world. Also, it sounds like your spray distance was too far and the paint evaporated before it hit the car. Tamiya paint is highly volatile. The can recommends 8-10 inches from the work, which is closer than most rattle cars. You want to apply paint in 3-5 passes from different angles, especially on SS cars, stock cars, reefers, or any other cars with raised details. Each pass should be slightly wet. Don’t worry about obscuring details, as it dries very fast and very thin. I use paint handles designed by Pierre, and I start with the underframe from all angles until it’s covered, then I do the sides, ends, and roof, in that order. Don’t try to do the whole car at once. Tamiya recommends temperatures above 50° F and avoid use on days where humidity is high. I’ve primed something like 100 car using Tamiya Fine Light Gray primer without any problems.

 

Nelson Moyer

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Tim O'Connor
Sent: Sunday, April 12, 2020 8:32 AM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: Tamiya primer (was [RealSTMFC] Painting brass)

 


The other day I tried Tamiya Primer Grey from the can, instead of an airbrush. I was
rather surprised that the paint's color pigment left a POWDER RESIDUE when the carrier
or thinner had evaporated. I actually scooped up a little pile of powder with a stiff
piece of cardstock - it had the exact same consistency as weathering powders that I have!

I have NEVER seen a paint of any type do this before.

Am I doing something wrong? I rarely use spray cans...

Tim O'Connor

P.S. Temperature in my workshop about 66F and low humidity (normal for NE winter)


On 4/11/2020 7:28 PM, Tony Thompson wrote:

Clark Propst wrote:




Would like to know what prep work folks do before laying on color?

 

   Clark, I almost always use a light gray primer, sometimes even from a rattle can, but with good paint, such as Tamiya. And I let it sit for some time to be ENTIRELY dry.

 

Tony Thompson

 


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts


--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts

June 1941. "Railroad yards. Milwaukee, WI

Hudson Leighton <hudsonl@...>
 

FSA/OWI photos - Omaha 1938, 1941

Paul Krueger
 

I was looking at photos on the Library of Congress website and found these from Omaha with freight cars. Most were taken November 1938, but I think one is from 1941.

Paul Krueger
Seattle, WA

Unloading 'coal' (looks like cinders or gravel to me) - MP USRA gondola

Union Stock Yards - boxcars in the background

Grain elevators - CGW boxcars in the midground, SAL box in the background, and what is that on the side of the boxcar behind the RI locomotive in the foreground?

CGW boxcar close-up (too bad the photographer wasn't back a foot or so)

American Smelting and Refining - nice cut of freight cars across the middle of the photo, is that a pickle car in the middle? Two rail cranes in the photo too.

Another view of American Smelting, but the freight cars are more distant

Unloading sheep at the stock yards - MILW stock car being unloaded, Quaker City Live Stock Express stock car in the background with part of a RI stock car.

Close-up of sheep being loaded into a stock car
 
Stock yards - decent view of ARLX 11801 on the right

Omaha rail yard - good views of roofs and ends

Omaha elevated view - some freight cars in the lower left corner


Re: Photo: Poultry Car

Ray Breyer
 

LPTC, please. The X didn't come until after 1926.

Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


On Sunday, April 12, 2020, 11:44:07 AM CDT, Eric Hansmann <eric@...> wrote:


I would guess the marks are LPTX. I can read TRANSIT on the sill under the door. I would assume this is a Live Poultry Transit Company car LPTX. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Apr 12, 2020, at 11:33 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Poultry Car

A photo from the Digital Horizons (http://www.digitalhorizonsonline.org/digital/about) website:

http://www.digitalhorizonsonline.org/digital/collection/ndshs-dm/id/432/rec/375

Description: "A railroad freight car that is loaded with poultry from Jamestown, N.D.  There is a door in the center of the railroad car, and open air traveling compartments on either side for the poultry.  There are crates on the right, and buildings in the background." "No later than 1926"

Can anyone make out the reporting marks?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Painting brass

Fred Jansz
 

Dip the model in thinner overnight, blast with alu oxide, wash & dry, then a light mist of Vallejo gray primer, paint with Tru-Color, decal and finish with Vallejo satin.
Fred Jansz

Re: Photo: Poultry Car

Eric Hansmann
 

I would guess the marks are LPTX. I can read TRANSIT on the sill under the door. I would assume this is a Live Poultry Transit Company car LPTX. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Apr 12, 2020, at 11:33 AM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Photo: Poultry Car

A photo from the Digital Horizons (http://www.digitalhorizonsonline.org/digital/about) website:

http://www.digitalhorizonsonline.org/digital/collection/ndshs-dm/id/432/rec/375

Description: "A railroad freight car that is loaded with poultry from Jamestown, N.D.  There is a door in the center of the railroad car, and open air traveling compartments on either side for the poultry.  There are crates on the right, and buildings in the background." "No later than 1926"

Can anyone make out the reporting marks?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: More WP West Coast Meat Reefer Data

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Fred,

I suppose there were reefer blocks within hot freight trains as a convenience for re-icing enroute. What I meant to imply is that most of the customers had sidings with a very short capacity, and probably would receive only one or two cars at a time, especially on the WP. At least on the WP you probably wouldn't see long trains of nothing but meat reefers. 

Maybe Tony or some of the other SP fans would have more information about meat reefers on the SP's Overland route.

Yours Aye,


Garth 

On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 10:43 AM Fred Jansz <fred@...> wrote:
Wow!
As a WP ànd reefer fan/modeler/collector I'm thrilled to be able to archive your extensive research Garth.
Always wondered if I should include some of these meat reefers in my collection.
And now I know which ones.
Thank you very much.
NB: do I understand well that these reefers wouldn't be in reefer blocks, but random in freight trains?

Cheers, Fred Jansz

Photo: GN Boxcar 24368 - Beer & Forward Facing Rocky

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: GN Boxcar 24368 - Beer & Forward Facing Rocky

A 1937 photo from the Tacoma Public Library Digital Collections:

http://cdm17061.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/singleitem/collection/p17061coll21/id/35581/rec/1698

Description: "A Great Northern freight car advertises Columbia Breweries "First Car Load Shipment of Canned Beer out of a Pacific Northwest Brewery, Leadership, Alt Heidelberg Guest Beer". In 1936 the company reported that they were the first of the Northwest brewers to introduce canned beer in the territory of Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Alaska."

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Photo: Poultry Car

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Poultry Car

A photo from the Digital Horizons (http://www.digitalhorizonsonline.org/digital/about) website:

http://www.digitalhorizonsonline.org/digital/collection/ndshs-dm/id/432/rec/375

Description: "A railroad freight car that is loaded with poultry from Jamestown, N.D.  There is a door in the center of the railroad car, and open air traveling compartments on either side for the poultry.  There are crates on the right, and buildings in the background." "No later than 1926"

Can anyone make out the reporting marks?

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA

Re: Question re: upcoming Rapido USRA DS box

Eric Hansmann
 

Bill W,

I understand those were a later addition. The Rapido models reflect many as-Built characteristics of the prototypes. 


Eric Hansmann
Murfreesboro, TN

On Apr 12, 2020, at 10:23 AM, Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:

Still not seeing the eave boards along the top of the sides.

Bill Welch
<SP_S 10078 USRA boxcar.tiff>