Date   

Re: Table Saw

Nolan Hinshaw
 

From: "destorzek@mchsi.com [STMFC]" <STMFC@yahoogroups.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, April 26, 2017 7:46 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Table Saw

Here is the ultimate saw for modelwork... but try and find one!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfGN6Wb1ZvY
I like the micrometer-like adjustment for the fence.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q2aZZLCrW9w
Too many distractions! My mind is overflowing with ways to cobble
something like that up for my own shop...
--
Nolan Hinshaw, San Francisco
"Not only is it not right, it's not even wrong!"
From Wolfgang Pauli, perpetrator of the Pauli Exclusion Principle









These were designed to cut lead Line-o-Type slugs, and sheet lead for spacers to compose newspaper pages. The guy in the first video hasn't figured out that the scale is marked in Pica.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Table Saw

Dennis Storzek
 

Here is the ultimate saw for modelwork... but try and find one!


These were designed to cut lead Line-o-Type slugs, and sheet lead for spacers to compose newspaper pages. The guy in the first video hasn't figured out that the scale is marked in Pica.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Table Saw

qmp211
 

Having spent hundreds of hours testing most all of the hobbyist tablesaws and designing/building/manufacturing a small radial arm saw, I respectfully disagree with some of the opinions expressed about what will yield the best results for cutting most anything including freight cars whether plastic or wood.

IMHO I think you will achieve far superior results incorporating the following ideas.

You'll need about a 4" diameter blade to clean cut most car bodies. The most reasonably priced saw is an older, OOP Dremel Table Saw. They bring a premium dollar on ebay. Make sure you have a seller with a return policy if the saw is bent or damaged. The saw was much maligned but when it is fine tuned, it is the most versatile table saw available for the money. If you're not familiar with setting up a table saw, grab a book featuring table saw tuneups and apply the same principles.
 
The saw will need a speed controller (with the Dremel Saw, it is mandatory!!) to prevent melting of resin/plastic cars. I've never found a saw that will make these cuts without a speed controller. The Dremel cuts best at about 3450 rpm = about 1/3 speed.

What you're looking for blade wise is a jewelers slotting saw, .025" to .032" thick with ZERO set of the teeth. A high quality slotting saw is a must and will yield a superior cut with a very smooth edge. Any set will defeat your objective. Set will cause the blade to grab the part, sling it into the wall and make you count your fingers 3x's before you exhale....

The car will need interior bracing and probably a part sled to keep your fingers out of the rotating machinery. Playdough, artist putty will work. You need to dampen part vibration during the cut to prevent the blade from grabbing the car sides and making a chipped edge.

The most difficult step is getting a square, plumb cut. Just because you get a .025" kerf doesn't mean you will get to slap pieces back together without fitting and sanding. I've had the best results using a NWSL True Sander with some custom sanding blocks. Best practice is to cut long and sand back to the line.

I would avoid any full size saw even if you have the testicular fortitude to dabble. They're too dangerous.

Good luck.

Randy Danniel







Re: Table saw

Marty McGuirk
 

Replying to myself - 

I should add I don’t have the Micro-Mark saw Richard linked to - mine is the larger saw that uses 3.25” blades. 


It’s less expensive than the Byrnes saw, but more than the one Rich provided the link for, which looks like a very small basic saw (which I have no experience with). 

That’s what I get for trying to respond to emails from work - where I can’t access a lot of commercial web sites. 

Sorry for the confusion. 

Marty



On Apr 26, 2017, at 2:54 PM, Marty McGuirk mjmcguirk@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Richard, 


I've also had issues with some Micro-Mark tools, and although I'm sure there are better mini table saws out there, I've been extremely pleased with the micro-lux table saw. I've never had any issues making clean, square cuts with it. 

I also like the Micro-Mark drill press - the X-Y table they sell for it... not so much....


Good luck, 


Marty McGuirk

Manassas Va

On April 26, 2017 at 2:27 PM "Richard Townsend richtownsend@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 
As long as we are talking about tools, I am considering buying a miniature table saw. I have been looking at the Byrnes precision saw (http://www.byrnesmodelmachines.com/tablesaw.html) but it is rather expensive. One of my main use for the saw would be in sectioning plastic car bodies in the course of kitbashing. I want to be sure to get cuts consistently as square as I can get them. 
 
What has been the experience of others on this list regarding table saws? Is the Micro-Mark saw a good tool? In my experience their tools vary in quality so I want to make sure that if I go the less expensive route and get that one (http://www.micromark.com/MicroLux-Miniature-Table-Saw)  that it will be up to the job. Are there other table saws that people have used and like?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 


 




Re: Table saw

spsalso
 

The Byrnes saw has a capacity of 15/16" with a 4" blade.  The Micro Mark a good bit smaller with its 2" blade.  I recommend a capacity adequate to make the required cut in a single pass.  You might also need to allow for the thickness of a sled for the piece.  Two inches for an HO car would work, plus maybe 1/2" for the sled.  Then 2 1/2" capacity.

I think you'll be happier with a "real" saw, for this kind of operation.  Dewalt makes a cute 8" battery powered saw, besides the more typical 10".

You could also use a chop saw, the less adjustable version of the famous compound miter saw.  Again, the blade has got to be (in my world) big enough for a single-pass cut.

For cutting plastic, I would recommend using blades with a LOT of set.  And likely a slow speed, though I think the set is the more important.

And setting up the work is very important.  For example, you'll likely want to put a block inside of cars with a u-shaped cross-section--if there's a slight bind, you could lose the part if you don't (see "LOT of set").




Ed

Edward Sutorik


NERPM in Enfield, Conn. is June 2-3

Dave Owens
 

Hello all:

This year’s NERPM, scheduled for Friday and Saturday June 2-3, and is
approaching quickly. If you haven’t preregistered or made your
reservation at the Holiday Inn Springfield South in Enfield, Conn.,
please don’t wait too much longer. You can now register online on our
site.

We have a tentative clinic list posted on our website:
http://nerpm.org/clinics-2017.html

A schedule is in the works.

The meet features dozens of clinics, a large model display, great
vendors, a white elephant table and several manufacturers, including
Rapido, Atlas, ESU, ScaleTrains and True Line Trains. We also expect
some historical societies to attend.

We have a variety of great vendors attending, including Funaro &
Camerlengo, Ron’s Books, Bob’s Photo, the Hobby Gallery, Minute Man
Scale Models/Scalecoat, Crusader Rail Services, New England Rail
Service, Bethlehem Car Works, Greg Gordon, Speedwitch Media, Mask
Island Decals, Shortline Model Products, Tom’s Trains, Yarmouth Model
Works and others.

On Sunday, several layouts will be open to those who attend the meet.

We hope you can make it.

Dave Owens


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing.2

np328
 

   Thank you Roger and Lester,
        your comments helped me ascertain that this route of using compressed gas is economically viable as opposed to purchasing an air compressor.                                       Jim Dick - Roseville, MN


Re: Table saw

Marty McGuirk
 

Richard,


I've also had issues with some Micro-Mark tools, and although I'm sure there are better mini table saws out there, I've been extremely pleased with the micro-lux table saw. I've never had any issues making clean, square cuts with it.

I also like the Micro-Mark drill press - the X-Y table they sell for it... not so much....


Good luck,


Marty McGuirk

Manassas Va

On April 26, 2017 at 2:27 PM "Richard Townsend richtownsend@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 
As long as we are talking about tools, I am considering buying a miniature table saw. I have been looking at the Byrnes precision saw (http://www.byrnesmodelmachines.com/tablesaw.html) but it is rather expensive. One of my main use for the saw would be in sectioning plastic car bodies in the course of kitbashing. I want to be sure to get cuts consistently as square as I can get them.
 
What has been the experience of others on this list regarding table saws? Is the Micro-Mark saw a good tool? In my experience their tools vary in quality so I want to make sure that if I go the less expensive route and get that one (http://www.micromark.com/MicroLux-Miniature-Table-Saw)  that it will be up to the job. Are there other table saws that people have used and like?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 


 


Table saw

Richard Townsend
 

As long as we are talking about tools, I am considering buying a miniature table saw. I have been looking at the Byrnes precision saw (http://www.byrnesmodelmachines.com/tablesaw.html) but it is rather expensive. One of my main use for the saw would be in sectioning plastic car bodies in the course of kitbashing. I want to be sure to get cuts consistently as square as I can get them.
 
What has been the experience of others on this list regarding table saws? Is the Micro-Mark saw a good tool? In my experience their tools vary in quality so I want to make sure that if I go the less expensive route and get that one (http://www.micromark.com/MicroLux-Miniature-Table-Saw)  that it will be up to the job. Are there other table saws that people have used and like?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 


ADMIN: Warning. RE: Re: pressure regulators for airbrushing

Mikebrock
 

While discussions about modeling tools including those used in painting is
within scope for the STMFC, environmental issues regarding such tools and
their use is out of scope on the STMFC. Given that, messages regarding
environmental issues associated with CO2 are out of scope and additional
such messages will result in punitive actions by STMFC mgt.



Mike Brock

STMFC Sheriff


Re: New file uploaded to STMFC

midrly
 

Interesting to this Canadian modeller to see CP 46' flatcar 300531 loaded with trucks (assuming that they were war materiel) in the consists.  According to Ian Cranstone's website, CP 300531 was built by the Eastern Car Company in New Glasgow NS in February, 1931.

For those modelling Canadian cars, Ian's is a very useful website---http://www.nakina.net/index.html

Thanks for this, Buddy.

Steve Lucas
 


Differences between Van Sweringen roads 3 bay offset vs AAR offset 3 bay hopper

Benjamin Scanlon
 

Hi 


A model is coming up for the AAR 3 bay offset hopper in TT and it's been made clear to me that the similar hoppers owned by ERIE, NKP etc are quite different from an AAR  3 bay offset hopper.  


Wondering if anyone knows the differences. The NKP ones seem to have odd placement of side supports but the ERIE ones look very alike to my untrained eye.  


I also understand the 'alternate' or Advisory Mechanical Committee / Mechanical Advisory Committee ? design was used by a few other RRs that weren't part of the Van Sweringen grouping.


Regards


Ben Scanlon

London


Re: pressure regulators for airbrushing

Allen Cain
 

Oops, forgot to sign the post on using Nitrogen.

Allen Cain


Re: pressure regulators for airbrushing

Allen Cain
 

I have heard that Nitrogen is great for painting as the water based acrylics do not tend to air dry between the nozzle and the painted surface.

Nitrogen makes up about 3/4 of the air that we breath if my memory going back to college is right so it is environmentally friendly.  I also think that Nitrogen is extracted from the air and compressed for sale.

I keep planning to buy a Nitrogen tank. Picked up a Nitrogen 2 stage regulator off EBay some time back at a big savings.


Re: Hinges - Swift Refrigerator Cars

Douglas Harding
 

Yes, the Atlas model has two hinges per door. And the Atlas HO model is of an entirely different car, with different details. Nor is it a model of a Swift reefer, Atlas claims it is a model of a Cudahy reefer built in 1925 by General American. I have a photo of a Cudahy reefer built in 1928 that looks very very close to the Atlas model. The Rapido meat reefer is a reefer built by General American between 1937 -1941. Rapido used prototype documents, drawings etc to get their model correct. It is a different design from the Atlas model. Both are legit steam era meat reefers and we HO modelers of meat traffic are grateful for both models.

 

To my knowledge there was no rule that required three hinges per door. Many reefers were built with two hinges per door. Look at the many doors in your house and I suspect you will find some have three hinges and others have two hinges. The main reasons are 1) the weight of the door, ie its design and 2) the function of the door. A closet door with a skin is not an main entry door made of solid wood, steel or fiberglass. Reefer designs varied and different manufactures had different ideas and buyers had different demands.

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 5:55 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Hinges - Swift Refrigerator Cars

 

 

The Atlas HO model of a Swift meat reefer has two hinges per door while the Rapido model has three per door.

J Lancaster


Re: pressure regulators for airbrushing

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Not to miss the fact that the fermentation process gives off CO2 as a waste product. And while I'm at it, remember that all carbonated refreshments (adult and otherwise) contain dissolved CO2. I could go on, but I suspect that the good Dr. Smith might object to my beating of a dead horse...
 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA


On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 10:47 AM, "'Bruce F. Smith' smithbf@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
OK - before this gets too out of control, I would like to point out that if you get a CO2 system, you can also use if to dispense beer from kegs, as I do, which is a serious plus!   ;)

Regards
Bruce

Bruce F. Smith            
Auburn, AL
"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Apr 25, 2017, at 12:41 PM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



I would like to add to this conversation about the use of CO2, a recognized greenhouse gas which is increasing in concentration in the Earth's atmosphere.

The use of CO2 would seem reflexively to be bad, as global efforts are needed to decrease CO2. However, most industrial bottled CO2 is captured from natural gas extraction as a waste product. This CO2 would end up in the atmosphere with industrial use or simply left ignored.

As long as we produce and use natural gas, we will have CO2. Avoiding using CO2 for painting freight cars won't make a difference in the climate.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA






Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing.2

frograbbit602
 

Jim I know 1999 was the year of purchase for my first tank and regulator; however, as for price I have to go on memory as I can not find purchase price in my records. I am guessing around $175 for a five pound bottle, regulator, and fittings to fit air brush hose. As you remove the regulator ( mine reads 0-60 psi ) when you take the tank in for refill or exchange I still have the original regulator. The tank once empty has been refilled or exchanged for a new one when it no longer met pressure test specs. If tank exchanged I would ask for a clean tank which I was always able to obtain. As for tank refill price I have records that show I paid $ 9.71 for my first refill in 1999 and $25.00 for my last in 2016.
Lester Breuer


Re: pressure regulators for airbrushing

benjamin
 

If you guys are going to complain about CO2 pollution why don't you also complain about the ozone created while running trains or the plastic pollution caused when sanding or trimming the flash off of your epoxy and plastic models. 

This is not an Al Gore Global Warming site but a Model Railroad Hobby site!  Lets keep politics out if it!

Ben Heinley (in ozone polluted Denver Colorado)
 


Re: pressure regulators for airbrushing

earlyrail
 

The use of CO2 would seem reflexively to be bad, as global efforts are needed to decrease CO2. However, most industrial bottled CO2 is captured from natural gas extraction as a waste product

In some locations this is true. In others it is extracted from the local atmosphere. then it would be a wash as afar as the earth is concerned.

Howard Garner


Re: New file uploaded to STMFC

gary laakso
 

The listing includes NP 61130 and it is a 1937 built 53 foot flat car.

 

Gary Laakso

south of Mike Brock

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 6:42 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] New file uploaded to STMFC

 

 


Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.

File : /x4561 Daily Interchange Rpt pg.2.jpg
Uploaded by : palmettoltd82 <palmettoLTD@...>
Description : Southern Military Train Charleston to Staten Is.-NYPOE

You can access this file at the URL:
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To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
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