Date   

Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Charles Peck
 

If my original post had been read fully, including the post I quoted, one might have noticed
that I was referring to the use of a Harbor Freight regulator on the full tank pressure.
No where did I suggest that 3000 PSI should be used in an air brush. 
When I am risking my personal safety around highly compressed gasses, I want equipment
that is worthy of trust, not the "El Cheapo" brand.  But I suppose some folks do not see
a risk factor in high pressures.
Chuck Peck in FL 

On Tue, Apr 25, 2017 at 1:07 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


lol - yeah I'd guess that 3000 psi is well beyond the "crush strength" of
the average HO scale model. assuming you could even hold onto the airbrush,
hoping it didn't impale itself in your chest...

Tim O'


Chuck Peck wrote:
"Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product."

You must have some serious premature drying issues if you're using 3000 psi HP air.  Plus it must beat up the models pretty bad.  [/sarcasm]

Ben Hom



Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Tim O'Connor
 


lol - yeah I'd guess that 3000 psi is well beyond the "crush strength" of
the average HO scale model. assuming you could even hold onto the airbrush,
hoping it didn't impale itself in your chest...

Tim O'


Chuck Peck wrote:
"Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product."

You must have some serious premature drying issues if you're using 3000 psi HP air.  Plus it must beat up the models pretty bad.  [/sarcasm]

Ben Hom


Re: Mystery car

Tim O'Connor
 

Mike

I suspect that the trucks on that car are replacements for the originals.
The NYC cars had trucks with integral plain bearing journal boxes when they
were built and were later converted to roller bearings which could be seen
when the journal box lids were removed.

Tim O'

Thanks, thats a very interesting shot........

While your find has Andrews RB trucks, the HCMX still had friction bearing Barbers S2 ..... If I remember correctly the shots I was reviewing several hours ago on the other computer.

[I really want to put up a central server for this house and have everything together]

Best to ya...
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi, USA



On Apr 24, 2017, at 1:13 PM, Tim O'Connor wrote:


Yep. I took many photos of a nearly identical ex-NYC car sitting in the
"relic collection" in Utica, New York ~14-15 years ago.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/timboconnor/34089410612/


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Andy Carlson
 

Thanks for the wonderful responses. Most helpful. Once again I am in full appreciation of the range of knowledge and interests within this group's membership.
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA








.




Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Mansell Peter Hambly
 

I use diving air. It's dry and filtered.  In addition, the air is contained in diving tanks that are no longer in use by divers but they have to be hydro tested every five years.  The tank has two gauges, one that shows the amount of air remaining and the psi gauge.

Mansell Peter Hambly
COQUITLAM, B.C.


From: "STMFC"
To: "STMFC"
Sent: Tuesday, April 25, 2017 8:21:57 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

 

Jon,

Either gas would work. CO2 has the advantage that it is more easily available and inexpensive.
 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA


On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 7:57 AM, "Jon Miller atsfus@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
On 4/25/2017 5:09 AM, frograbbit602@... [STMFC] wrote:

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator

    I always thought that nitrogen was the gas to use if airbrushing?
  Too costly?
--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS




Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Bill Daniels <billinsf@...>
 

Jon,

Either gas would work. CO2 has the advantage that it is more easily available and inexpensive.
 
Bill Daniels
San Francisco, CA


On Tuesday, April 25, 2017 7:57 AM, "Jon Miller atsfus@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
On 4/25/2017 5:09 AM, frograbbit602@... [STMFC] wrote:

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator

    I always thought that nitrogen was the gas to use if airbrushing?  Too costly?
--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS



Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 4/25/2017 5:09 AM, frograbbit602@... [STMFC] wrote:

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator

    I always thought that nitrogen was the gas to use if airbrushing?  Too costly?
-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Bruce Smith
 

Ben,

While Chuck may have overstated the pressure by about 3 fold, the internal pressure of the tank and therefore the pressure seen on the high pressure side of the regulator is about 800-1100 psi… So his point about buying cheap equipment is well made.  In addition, those cheaper regulators are more likely to blow out their diaphragms, which, if it happens while connected to an airbrush could indeed make a serious mess out of a steam era freight car!

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Apr 25, 2017, at 9:13 AM, Benjamin Hom b.hom@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Chuck Peck wrote:
"Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product."

You must have some serious premature drying issues if you're using 3000 psi HP air.  Plus it must beat up the models pretty bad.  [/sarcasm]


Ben Hom


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Benjamin Hom
 

Chuck Peck wrote:
"Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product."

You must have some serious premature drying issues if you're using 3000 psi HP air. Plus it must beat up the models pretty bad. [/sarcasm]


Ben Hom


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Charles Peck
 

Different people have different priorities.  Personally I would not want to risk putting 3000 PSI on the cheapest possible product. 
Chuck Peck in FL

On Tue, Apr 25, 2017 at 9:33 AM, land46lord@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

 
 
Greetings,

Suggest you try Harbor Freight, they had several regulators in the lower ranges to choose from, they also do web order.

Louie B. Hydrick
​ 



Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Louie B. Hydrick
 

 
 
Greetings,

Suggest you try Harbor Freight, they had several regulators in the lower ranges to choose from, they also do web order.

Louie B. Hydrick
Associate Broker
RE/MAX Partners
4316 Washington Road
Evans GA 30809-3957

706-832-6263 Mobile
706-922-7355 Office
706-922-7356 Fax
706-922-7368 Direct

GA Lic. 207874 SC Lic. 14865

Or visit me on the web at:
www.csrahomesandland.com
or
www.louiebhydrick.remax-georgia.com


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

frograbbit602
 

Andy I use a CO2 bottle with regulator. My bottle is only five pound so I have to exchange it or have it filled more often than your twenty pound.  The places I have it filled ( in MN Toll or Minneapolis Oxygen ) both sell various regulators ( I have  0 to 60 ) and can replace the one you have with another.  I am sure your CO2  suppliers can do the same.
Lester Breuer


Re: Mystery car

mwbauers
 

Thanks, thats a very interesting shot........

While your find has Andrews RB trucks, the HCMX still had friction bearing Barbers S2 ..... If I remember correctly the shots I was reviewing several hours ago on the other computer.

[I really want to put up a central server for this house and have everything together]

Best to ya...
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi, USA



On Apr 24, 2017, at 1:13 PM, Tim O'Connor  wrote:


Yep. I took many photos of a nearly identical ex-NYC car sitting in the
"relic collection" in Utica, New York ~14-15 years ago.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/timboconnor/34089410612/

Tim O'Connor


Re: URTX 67806 (Meat Reefer)

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <timboconnor@...> wrote :


Dennis those all appear to be significantly different looking rebuilds than
this car - and I could be wrong but they all appear to be 36 foot cars! (I know
the web site says they are 40 feet long but they sure don't look like it to me.
Maybe an optical illusion because the doors aren't as tall?)
=======================

Tim, I think you are correct. The original car in question has ten roof panels, plus the two panels with the hatches. The cars at IRM have nine plus two. By this time everyone's roof panels seem to have standardized at 41" wide (IIRC) and a few inches difference in each corner panel would make up the other seven or so inches. Sorry if I led anyone astray.

Dennis Storzek


Re: URTX 67806 (Meat Reefer)

rwitt_2000
 

I agree with Tim these cars, URTX 66219, 66221, 66234, and 66244, look shorter and appear to resembled those in the 15000 series and originally built for Swift per Roger's post.

Bob Witt


Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Charles Peck
 

Andy, if you get in contact with an industrial gas distributor they should be able to modify your regulator
to better suit your needs. Replacing the 0-300 gauge with one reading 0-60 or 0-100 should help
quite a bit.  Most gas distributors either repair and maintain regulators or have contact with some firm
that does do that work.
Regards,
Chuck Peck in FL 

On Mon, Apr 24, 2017 at 8:17 PM, Andy Carlson midcentury@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Hi-
Back in the 1980s I acquired a 20 pound CO2 bottle and a Badger single gauge regulator. I am 100% satisfied with the whole unit's operation, and I am impressed at the simplicity and ease to set the operating pressure.

I have recently acquired acquired another 20 pound CO2 bottle and a different make of regulator. This regulator has 2 gauges--one for bottle pressure (0-3000 PSI) and a 2nd gauge for the regulated output pressure of 0-300 PSI.

I am reminded of the old days of a 9000 RPM tachometer in a car with 5000 RPM shift points. The usable range of RPMs is but a portion of the tach face, making small increments harder to read. With the 2nd pressure regulator, the range in which I would use is 15-30 PSI, but the sweep area for that is difficult to ascertain as that range is just 1/4 " travel of the gauge's dial.

My question for those whom may be able to help is this: Do I just need another down-stream gauge for the regulator, or am I not using the correct regulator for my application. I wish to give this 2nd CO2 outfit to a long-time friend and would like him to be able to jump right in without any difficulties.

Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Re: Pressure regulators for airbrushing

Jack Burgess
 

You should be able to simply replace the 0-300 psi pressure gauge with a 0-50 psi gauge or something similar. You just need to take the current gauge to the hardware store and add any fittings needed to mate the new gauge to the existing connection. I’m guessing that the only potential problem is to not open the 2nd regulator too far that you exceed the capacity of the pressure gauge.



Jack Burgess



From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Monday, April 24, 2017 5:18 PM
To: STMFC YahooGroup
Subject: [STMFC] Pressure regulators for airbrushing








Hi-

Back in the 1980s I acquired a 20 pound CO2 bottle and a Badger single gauge regulator. I am 100% satisfied with the whole unit's operation, and I am impressed at the simplicity and ease to set the operating pressure.



I have recently acquired acquired another 20 pound CO2 bottle and a different make of regulator. This regulator has 2 gauges--one for bottle pressure (0-3000 PSI) and a 2nd gauge for the regulated output pressure of 0-300 PSI.



I am reminded of the old days of a 9000 RPM tachometer in a car with 5000 RPM shift points. The usable range of RPMs is but a portion of the tach face, making small increments harder to read. With the 2nd pressure regulator, the range in which I would use is 15-30 PSI, but the sweep area for that is difficult to ascertain as that range is just 1/4 " travel of the gauge's dial.



My question for those whom may be able to help is this: Do I just need another down-stream gauge for the regulator, or am I not using the correct regulator for my application. I wish to give this 2nd CO2 outfit to a long-time friend and would like him to be able to jump right in without any difficulties.



Thanks,

-Andy Carlson

Ojai CA










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?

Rich C
 

This is a tough one. All the choices made would be welcome to us modelers. I would probably go with an Rr-56 just because of the number built compared to the others.

Rich Christie

ps - I too have seen them in MOW colors. There was a pair used as buffer cars for a welded rail train traveling over Tehachapi back in the 80s. They would remove the roof and fill them with rebar, then reattach the roof.


On Monday, April 24, 2017 2:39 PM, "Charles Slater atsfcondr42@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Bob some of the Rr-56 cars went into M of W service also, I forgot to mention that on my last E-mail. Also I have many photos of these cars. 
Charlie Slater 

Sent from Outlook



From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 6:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?
 
 
I have a friend who is in the product development group at a major model manufacture. For many years I have been asking him (Read: begging) for a first generation mechanical refrigerator car.
 
This week he finally asked me what I would propose for an HO scale model (and possibly one in N scale as well). My personal preference is an Rr-56, however, I only speak for myself.
 
If you were to propose that a manufacturer invest in the tooling and production of a first generation Santa Fe mechanical refrigerator car, which class would you suggest?
 
Keep in mind, a manufacturer wants to be able to produce cars that would sell based on the number of prototypes built, paint scheme variations and re-numberings that would allow for multiple production runs over the years.
 
In the case of mechanical reefers, later conversions to insulated boxcars and MOW service also are positive factors.
 
So, what are your candidate mechanical reefers (Santa Fe ONLY) and why? And I assume most everyone on this group wants separately applied details or a design that makes such upgrades relatively easy.
 
Thanks.
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA



Re: Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?

Bill Vaughn
 

The Rr-56 would be a great car and so would the Rr-69

Bill Vaughn



On Monday, April 24, 2017 12:39 PM, "Charles Slater atsfcondr42@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Bob some of the Rr-56 cars went into M of W service also, I forgot to mention that on my last E-mail. Also I have many photos of these cars. 
Charlie Slater 

Sent from Outlook



From: STMFC@... on behalf of thecitrusbelt@... [STMFC]
Sent: Sunday, April 23, 2017 6:15 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Early ATSF Mechanical Reefer Models - What Do You Want?
 
 
I have a friend who is in the product development group at a major model manufacture. For many years I have been asking him (Read: begging) for a first generation mechanical refrigerator car.
 
This week he finally asked me what I would propose for an HO scale model (and possibly one in N scale as well). My personal preference is an Rr-56, however, I only speak for myself.
 
If you were to propose that a manufacturer invest in the tooling and production of a first generation Santa Fe mechanical refrigerator car, which class would you suggest?
 
Keep in mind, a manufacturer wants to be able to produce cars that would sell based on the number of prototypes built, paint scheme variations and re-numberings that would allow for multiple production runs over the years.
 
In the case of mechanical reefers, later conversions to insulated boxcars and MOW service also are positive factors.
 
So, what are your candidate mechanical reefers (Santa Fe ONLY) and why? And I assume most everyone on this group wants separately applied details or a design that makes such upgrades relatively easy.
 
Thanks.
 
Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA



Re: Coal Country RPM: April 20-21, 2018

Michael Gross
 

Guess they have to start in what most think of as "coal country," but appreciate Tony's comment as regards Illinois, as I was always fascinated by Coal City on the AT&SF's Illinois Division.

Michael Gross
Pasadena, CA
--
Michael Gross
Facebook.com/ActorMichaelGross
Twitter.com/MichaelGrossBiz
Instagram:  ActorMichaelGross
Kerner Management Associates

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