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New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.


File : /ATSF craftsman kits 16-06.pdf
Uploaded by : peteraue <peteraue@yahoo.de>
Description : Updated HO scale model list of transition time ATSF freight car kits


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/ATSF%20craftsman%20kits%2016-06.pdf


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&;y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


peteraue <peteraue@yahoo.de>


New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.


File : /ATSF 1950 significant freight car classes 16-06.pdf
Uploaded by : peteraue <peteraue@yahoo.de>
Description : Updated ist of most significant ATSF freight car classes in 1950 and HO scale and N scale models of these cars


You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/STMFC/files/ATSF%201950%20significant%20freight%20car%20classes%2016-06.pdf


To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&;y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398


Regards,


peteraue <peteraue@yahoo.de>


Help with PFE trucks

rob.mclear3@...
 

Hi to all the fine folks on this list.   At the moment I am building a Sunshine kit of a PFE R-70-2 Super Giant Reefer I think the kit number is #25 but the instructions are not very clear on what trucks should be under the car, I have a good supply of Tahoe trucks and can get others from the local hobby dealers.  (I say local but they are all 250 kms away, about 190 miles for our American friends.)   Any help is appreciated.

Regards
Rob McLear
Aussie.


Re: is this an early PS-3?

Justin May <jmay59@...>
 

Who else had 2-bay PS-3s?
Scott,
DL&W 85560, is an ACF product built in the late 1940s (1949 or thereabouts) and rated at 50-tons. It featured 2,221 cubic feet capacity, and was largely welded. DL&W also rostered later examples with single posts. The length varied between 34'4" and 34'8" depending upon the series.

http://www.rr-fallenflags.org/el/frt/dlw85815amf.jpg

50-ton PS-3 owners were as follows, though I don't have all of the series information on hand.

APX, Alabama Power Company, built 2-53
CRR 52000-52499, built 3-53
GA 21300-21399, built 2-53
L&N 34000-35999, built 4-49
L&N 82200-85199, built 4-52
NC&StL
PSX 3, built 5-53
Tennessee Central 9500-9699, built 4-53

Justin May


Distant freight car images from 1910

Schuyler Larrabee
 


is this an early PS-3?

D. Scott Chatfield
 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/DL-W-Delaware-Lackawanna-Western-hopper-85560-taken-in-August-1964/301982678446

What caught my eye are the channel-section posts over the bolsters, similar to early PS-2 covered hoppers. Is this a true PS-3? I don't recall much being written about PS-3s, Pullman's welded-body coal hoppers built starting in the '50s. The old Train-Miniature model, still sold by Walthers, is a 2-bay PS-3. Pullman made a lot more 3-bays, especially for the L&N, and those have been covered recently by Tangent in HO and Atlas in N.

The 2-bay PS-3 was introduced just in time for the 55-ton coal hopper to fade from popularity, so it makes sense that the 90-ton and later 100-ton PS-3s were much more popular. I once shot a Georgia Road 2-bay PS-3, and I gather L&N bought some before going crazy for 90-ton 3-bays. Who else had 2-bay PS-3s?

Scott Chatfield


Molds via 3D printing. Termination of Completely New Resin

Mikebrock
 

ADMIN: Tom Madden says:

" A toss-off that contains embarrassing punctuation, grammar and syntax errors that escaped my notice in my haste to be clever."

The fact that I also have a tendency to expel bits of what I claim to be humor [ sorry, but the world will not live long without humor ] and since Tom provides needed leadership in many avenues of our hobby, we will permit an occasional lapse by him into that area where imagination resides. Particularly when he provides us with:

"Let's pull this back into the realm of acceptability for the STMFC. Most of us have a vision of what 3D printing will/should/might be able to do for the hobby when it (3D printing) matures. Pierre is demonstrating how to work with what 3D printing can do today. You have three parameters: price, level and quality of detail, and suitability for use. You get to control only one, If your "use' is as a small static or display piece, something right out of a printer might work. (OK, not right out of the printer. You'll have to clean, assemble and/or paint it.) But if you want a model durable enough to be operated and handled repeatedly, you'll be disappointed by the detail level - or shocked by the cost.


Pierre's use is as a pattern for resin casting. For that, the high up front costs for designing and printing can be justified, and the originals only have to survive one round of mold making if he uses first generation castings to assemble his production masters. I don't know what Pierre has invested in the project, nor what his anticipated production will be, but he's certainly taking a risk, and it's really on our behalf. I wish him well and will certainly be buying one of these models."

I do think, though, that we will need to operate in the real world for awhile [ until I think up something funny ] so the thread "Completely New Resin" is now terminated. Use this message's subject to respond about Tom's above comments about "real" 3D printing to make molds.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner


Re: Completely New Resin

Charles Peck
 

My dear Tom Madden,
A sense of humor and a sense of humility round out and polish in my eyes the image of a very
dedicated and generous man.  Your gifts to our hobby would be hard to exaggerate and I am
personally the better, thanks to you.  It has been my pleasure to hear you and speak with you
at Cocoa Beach.
And yes, your funny side is one of the things I will remember about you, just as a bit of patina
warms and highlights a fine piece of bronze art. 
Your friend,
Chuck Peck in FL

On Mon, Jun 13, 2016 at 4:44 PM, pullmanboss@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 
<Sigh>  Sixty five years in the hobby, dozens of clinic presentations, thousands of hours of Pullman research to unearth data useful to modelers, dabbling in advanced technologies to help make them accessible to the hobby, and I'll probably be remembered for a ten minute toss-off intended to tease Pierre for being overly coy about his CP auto car project. A toss-off that contains embarrassing punctuation, grammar and syntax errors that escaped my notice in my haste to be clever.

​ 

Tom Madden



Re: Virtual RPM

pennsylvania1954
 

Excellent modeling, Fenton, and thanks, Eric, for bringing them to us.

This received a bit more comment over on the resin list, but there is a broader point to be made here.

Having these well done photos with a brief narrative is extremely useful. Much more useful and user friendly than this list's Photos section, this is the sort of thing that should make it over to the dormant but still very valuable Steam Era Freight Cars site. http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/

I routinely gleen the best STMFC models from the photo reports of RPM meets, but these are often less than "well done" due to lighting and staging factors.

Please bring on more!

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


Re: Completely New Resin

Tom Madden
 

A fan wrote :
>
> Very convincing story that made my lousy prototype modeling day. I propose
> a Pulitzer prize nomination for Tom.

You misspelled "Pullet Surprise".

<Sigh>  Sixty five years in the hobby, dozens of clinic presentations, thousands of hours of Pullman research to unearth data useful to modelers, dabbling in advanced technologies to help make them accessible to the hobby, and I'll probably be remembered for a ten minute toss-off intended to tease Pierre for being overly coy about his CP auto car project. A toss-off that contains embarrassing punctuation, grammar and syntax errors that escaped my notice in my haste to be clever.

Let's pull this back into the realm of acceptability for the STMFC. Most of us have a vision of what 3D printing will/should/might be able to do for the hobby when it (3D printing) matures. Pierre is demonstrating how to work with what 3D printing can do today. You have three parameters: price, level and quality of detail, and suitability for use. You get to control only one, If your "use' is as a small static or display piece, something right out of a printer might work. (OK, not right out of the printer. You'll have to clean, assemble and/or paint it.) But if you want a model durable enough to be operated and handled repeatedly, you'll be disappointed by the detail level - or shocked by the cost.

Pierre's use is as a pattern for resin casting. For that, the high up front costs for designing and printing can be justified, and the originals only have to survive one round of mold making if he uses first generation castings to assemble his production masters. I don't know what Pierre has invested in the project, nor what his anticipated production will be, but he's certainly taking a risk, and it's really on our behalf. I wish him well and will certainly be buying one of these models.

Disclaimer: I've done casting for Pierre but am not involved in this project.

Tom Madden


Re: the owner of the first tank car behind the locomotive

Todd Sullivan
 

And Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Company (CCBX reporting marks) had large operations in South Charleston, Clendenin and Institute, WV, and in Texas City and Seadrift, TX.  They produced a lot of industrial  chemicals including ethylene, Bakelite, butadiene and styrene.

Interesting history on the Union Carbide website and Wikipedia.

Todd Sullivan
Liverpool, NY


Re: the owner of the first tank car behind the locomotive

Bruce Smith
 

Interestingly, this car, which is clearly a retrofit of 2 additional compartments onto a single compartment car does not appear to be of General American design and in fact appears to be an AC&F designed car.  I know, lots of cars moved between companies :)

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jun 13, 2016, at 1:41 PM, STMFC@... wrote:

As per the reporting marks, GATX is the car owner with number 31230. I think the lessor is Union Carbide, based upon the lettering on the lower side of the tank.

The larger lettering seems to read: Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Company.

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

On Jun 13, 2016, at 12:35 PM, 'Claus Schlund HGM' claus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hi List Members,

Anyone have some ideas on the owner of the first (3-compaqrtment tank) car behind the locomotive? One can almost (but not quite)
make it out.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/31038626@N07/3249257022/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund


Re: the owner of the first tank car behind the locomotive

Richard Townsend
 

The lessor is "Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Company" which was a subsidiary of Union Carbide established in 1920. The owner is General American.
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, OR
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: 'Claus Schlund HGM' claus@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Mon, Jun 13, 2016 11:35 am
Subject: [STMFC] the owner of the first tank car behind the locomotive

 
Hi List Members,

Anyone have some ideas on the owner of the first (3-compaqrtment tank) car behind the locomotive? One can almost (but not quite)
make it out.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/31038626@N07/3249257022/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund


Re: the owner of the first tank car behind the locomotive

Eric Hansmann
 

As per the reporting marks, GATX is the car owner with number 31230. I think the lessor is Union Carbide, based upon the lettering on the lower side of the tank.

The larger lettering seems to read: Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Company.

Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX

On Jun 13, 2016, at 12:35 PM, 'Claus Schlund HGM' claus@hellgatemodels.com [STMFC] <STMFC@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi List Members,

Anyone have some ideas on the owner of the first (3-compaqrtment tank) car behind the locomotive? One can almost (but not quite)
make it out.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/31038626@N07/3249257022/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund



------------------------------------
Posted by: "Claus Schlund HGM" <claus@hellgatemodels.com>
------------------------------------


------------------------------------

Yahoo Groups Links



Re: Truck mounting

Bill Welch
 

Eric, I am wondering if these are new trucks or a re-packaging/branding of their previous model. They are sprung like their older truck and unlike the L-L P2K trucks they absorbed.

Bill Welch


Re: the owner of the first tank car behind the locomotive

Tony Thompson
 

Claus Schlund wrote:

 

Anyone have some ideas on the owner of the first (3-compaqrtment tank) car behind the locomotive? One can almost (but not quite)
make it out.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/31038626@N07/3249257022/sizes/o/


       The owner clearly is General American, GATX. Probably you want to know the lessee, which I can't quite read either.

Tony Thompson




Re: Completely New Resin

Bill Welch
 

Gee whiz Jared, am I supposed to apologize because I enjoy building models?!

Bill Welch


the owner of the first tank car behind the locomotive

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,

Anyone have some ideas on the owner of the first (3-compaqrtment tank) car behind the locomotive? One can almost (but not quite) make it out.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/31038626@N07/3249257022/sizes/o/

Claus Schlund


Re: Completely New Resin

Jared Harper
 



Anything?  I really do not enjoy Building models.  I love the research and operating trains prototypically in a prototypical setting.  I build models to get from A to C.  So I won't have to do so much B I am having folks build models for me.  Right now Pierre Oliver is doing four cars for me.

Jared Harper

---In STMFC@..., <fgexbill@...> wrote :

Jared, I am retired. I don't do anything unless it is fun.

Bill Welch


Virtual RPM

Eric Hansmann
 

Fenton Wells shares a number of his recent freight car builds in a virtual RPM on the Resin Car Works blog. Check it out!

http://blog.resincarworks.com/virtual-rpm-2/



Eric Hansmann
RCW web guy

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