Date   

testimonial for Yarmoutn

ed_mines
 

Well I used the eye bolts on an F&C twin milk tank car and it looks super.


Used Yarmouth stirrup steps on some PFE & SFRD plastic reefers and they look great too.


Ed Mines


Re: Bowser's H30 PRR covered hopper questions

pennsylvania1954
 

Bill--The sill steps are plastic but are well done.

Steve Hoxie
Pensacola FL


TESTIMONIAL FOR YARMOUTH STEPS

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

I just applied some Yarmouth steps for the Proto 2000 tank car to a MP panel side gondola that I am finishing up.
They are great. Since I had a Proto 2000 utjtank car handy I decided to compare Pierre's steps to those on the model.
I expected them to be more durable than the model steps (They will not flick off the first time someone picks up the
model). I waqs viery pleased to find that they also had a slimmer profile to the model steps.

Greaat work Pierre (and Peter).

Bill Pardie


Re: Jeff Wilson's Freight Cars of the '40s and '50s

frograbbit602
 

I bought the book.  The photos, in my opinion, make the book worth the purchase price.

Lester Breuer



Re: Bowser's H30 PRR covered hopper questions

Benjamin Hom
 


Bill Welch asked:
"With some luck I was able to find one of Bowser's H30 in the as-delivered scheme. Still hard to believe how gorgeous these are and their pricing. I do have two questions.

1.) Are the sill steps metal or plastic?"
Unfortunately, my cars are on Marty McGuirk's layout...

"2.) I know I need to replace the trucks w/Crown trucks. (Humm, who makes Crown Trucks? Oh wait I know, Bowser, so why didn't they. . .?)"

Be advised that Class H30 cars were equipped with a variety of trucks, so Crown trucks may not necessarily be the case.
"Am I correct that I should paint the new trucks some shade of Oxide Red?"
 
Maybe for a repainted FCC color car.  Definitely not for a gray car (black trucks).  Black for a car as built, then weathered as the car ran in service.  Some cars in cement service picked up considerable gray streaking, including the trucks.  As always, check photos if possible.
 
 
Ben Hom


Bowser's H30 PRR covered hopper questions

Bill Welch
 

With some luck I was able to find one of Bowser's H30 in the as-delivered scheme. Still hard to believe how gorgeous these are and their pricing. I do have two questions.


1.) Are the sill steps metal or plastic?


2.) I know I need to replace the trucks w/Crown trucks. (Humm, who makes Crown Trucks? Oh wait I know, Bowser, so why didn't they. . .?) Am I correct that I should paint the new trucks some shade of Oxide Red?


Thank you

Bill Welch


Re: Jeff Wilson's Freight Cars of the '40s and '50s

Bill Welch
 

Thanks everybody,

As someone who enjoys watching the news and flipping through one of my notebooks of freight car photos, I would enjoy seeing any up-tapped resources and I am sure Kalmbach has a lot of photos of freight cars I have not seen. It sounds like he did not use photos from Bob's, Wil Whitaker, Rich Burg, etc. so visually fresh material.

Bill Welch


Re: Jeff Wilson's Freight Cars of the '40s and '50s

Rob & Bev Manley
 

I'll also add it brought me great relief during my hospital stay. It is a good reference to those we are mentoring such as wives and grandchildren. He managed to sneak in a few CB&Q photos.

Rob Manley

Sent from Rob's ancient iPhone 3 but then again who am I to complain.....

On Sep 16, 2015, at 12:48 PM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Bill Welch wrote:

 
I am curious if anyone has seen and can comment on Jeff's new book on the subject that brings many of us together on this site?

    I do have a copy. I would comment differently for those who know, and those who don't know, the subject already. It is pretty pedestrian if you already know the subject, no surprises (nor should there be -- it is aimed at those who need to learn the basics). I always enjoy seeing additional photos, and Jeff was able to draw on Kalmbach's unsurpassed photo resources, so for me, it was worth picking up. And for anyone who feels unsure about how well they know the topic, I would certainly recommend it. Well written, not too long or pedantic, and very nicely reproduced photos.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Jeff Wilson's Freight Cars of the '40s and '50s

Armand Premo
 

I bought it sight unseen.I am sure some will find something worthwhile.I didn't.Armand Premo

----- Original Message -----
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2015 1:48 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Jeff Wilson's Freight Cars of the '40s and '50s

 

Bill Welch wrote:

 
I am curious if anyone has seen and can comment on Jeff's new book on the subject that brings many of us together on this site?

    I do have a copy. I would comment differently for those who know, and those who don't know, the subject already. It is pretty pedestrian if you already know the subject, no surprises (nor should there be -- it is aimed at those who need to learn the basics). I always enjoy seeing additional photos, and Jeff was able to draw on Kalmbach's unsurpassed photo resources, so for me, it was worth picking up. And for anyone who feels unsure about how well they know the topic, I would certainly recommend it. Well written, not too long or pedantic, and very nicely reproduced photos.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signature press.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history




No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
Version: 2014.0.4830 / Virus Database: 4365/10650 - Release Date: 09/16/15


Re: Jeff Wilson's Freight Cars of the '40s and '50s

Tony Thompson
 

Bill Welch wrote:

 
I am curious if anyone has seen and can comment on Jeff's new book on the subject that brings many of us together on this site?

    I do have a copy. I would comment differently for those who know, and those who don't know, the subject already. It is pretty pedestrian if you already know the subject, no surprises (nor should there be -- it is aimed at those who need to learn the basics). I always enjoy seeing additional photos, and Jeff was able to draw on Kalmbach's unsurpassed photo resources, so for me, it was worth picking up. And for anyone who feels unsure about how well they know the topic, I would certainly recommend it. Well written, not too long or pedantic, and very nicely reproduced photos.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Weather-It Replacement

Rossiter, Mark W <Mark.Rossiter@...>
 

Bill and list: Toy Train Heaven's website might say they have Weather-It in stock, but it isn't. I attempted to purchase some earlier this morning and got a refund notice along with an apology.

Mark Rossiter

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

1a. Re: Weather-It Replacement
Posted by: fgexbill@tampabay.rr.com lnbill
Date: Tue Sep 15, 2015 4:22 am ((PDT))

Weather-it is for aging wood, not metal. Toy Train Heaven's website says they have Weather-it in stock.

Bill Welch


Re: Weather-It Replacement

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

� Actually,� I prefer to use stains and paints - applied in a variety of techniques
and mixing each batch to suit my eye at the time.� The key techniques are the
"dry brush" streaks applied in the direction of the grain and acrylic washes as
a "weathering coat".� See steps below.
� When doing the dry brush streaks I change the color on the brush almost
every time I go back to the paint and 'build up' the colors/grain as I go.� It's
harder to explain that it is to do!
� It is important to start with the 'right' color/base coat.� If it is an unpainted
surface (such as the deck of a flat car) then I start with a shade of "grey that
has some overtones of brown in it" ... because unpainted wood turns grey
after only a few months in service.� The amount of grey depends upon how
long it has been since the car was re-decked.� But most of the brown overtones
are done in the dry brush stage.�
� It really doesn't take very long to do your own 'weathering' of unpainted
wood - the dry brush and washes go very quickly and can be applied in one
sitting with almost no time between coats/colors.

� 1) Base color coat (different color for every car).� This can be done with
����� an airbrush but I have also had great results doing this by using a
����� variety of colors/shades just using a brush and thinner paint than
����� normal brush painting (it doesn't have to cover!) - and applying it
����� 'board by board' so each board has a different base color.� If I'm
����� going to use a 'stain' I will do it in this step.

� 2) Dry brush streaks (lots of different colors but mostly a variety of greys.
������ This step provides the primary "final look" of the wood - for both the
������ color and the 'grain' and pretty much 'covers' the base coat.� This step
������ is easy and quick - once you've gotten the basic technique down
������ (which is not hard to learn how to do).� Start with too little paint on the
������ brush and experiment with more/less paint and different colors - each
������ time you go back to get more paint.� If you happen to dip too deeply
������ just 'paint a piece of paper towel' to remove paint from the brush.

� 3) Acrylic washes for weathering - a variety of colors/shades.� I do the
������ details (grabs, couplers, etc.), frame, trucks and wheels in this same
������ step.� I often use my finger(s) to create different streaking/effects.
� � � � � I've tried to learn the technique (that works for me) - for weathering
������ freight cars with the Dr. Ben's pigments - and just haven't been happy
� � �� with the results.� The first problem I have is that I always seem to get
� � �� too much color.� The 2nd problem with them is that they are
� � �� permanent so any "rework" means starting over at step #1.� Many
� � �� guys use pigments and are good at it - I just don't happen to be one
� � �� of them.

� 4) Chalks for 'collected areas of dirt'.� (Often rubbed in/out with my
� � � fingers.)� Can be done before step #3 for variety/different effect.

�5) Over spray of a -very- light "blending coats" of general weathering.
� �� Please note that this and the first step are the only ones that use
� �� an airbrush.� I don't 'hate' my airbrush - I just find that I use it a lot
���� less for weathering and use acrylic washes a lot more.� And that
���� you can't get the same end results 'just using an airbrush' for
����� weathering.
��
� There used to be (still is?) someone out there (one of the very small one
man companies) that makes great real wood decks for flat cars that you
can apply directly over the styrene deck.� The name started with a "B"?
Maybe "Randy Bachmann."?� If memory serves me correctly he also
made wood inserts for many of the popular box cars.� They are/were
super thin.� I hope he's still out there.� I think I bought them on eBay.
These -may- be the same ones now being sold under the American
Model Builders name (same guy just more "official"?).
���������������������������������������������������� � � ��������������������������������������� � � � � � � �� ��� - Jim B.


Fw: important message

dtnewcomb
 

Hey friend!

 

Check this out http://steponguides.com/these.php?w

 

arch@...

 

 

 


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: QUESTION ON CAST FRAME FLAT CARS (UNCLASSIFIED)

Gatwood, Elden J SAD
 

Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE

Group;

I did a little more digging, but was not able to come up with anything specific to that exact flat car; however, in my research on (and crawling under ex-) PRR flats that included the cast F30A-E, F41 and others, they generally ran from the right side (looking forward from the B end) of the coupler pocket straight alongside the center sill, crossing over approximately halfway along the length of the car, with the pipe passing through two or more holes cast diagonally through the casting of the center sill, then up the left side of the center sill to an exit through the end sill. Trainlines did not generally take "jogs" unless there was something they had to avoid, like following the floor of a depressed center flat, or on divided cars like a well hole car (like the PRR F37). Trainlines that dipped were subject to snaring and breakage by things lying on the trackbed, which could cause stoppage of the entire train.

Elden Gatwood

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 16, 2015 7:45 AM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [EXTERNAL] [STMFC] Re: QUESTION ON CAST FRAME FLAT CARS



Looks like it was straight on the (longer) N&W GSC flats.

NWHS NW-G45137-NW Mech Dwg <Blockedhttps://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/detail.php?ID=2668>
image <Blockedhttps://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/detail.php?ID=2668>
NWHS NW-G4513... <Blockedhttps://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/detail.php?ID=2668>
N&WHS Home Search the Archives Modify...
<Blockedhttps://www.nwhs.org/archivesdb/detail.php?ID=2668>
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David Thompson



Classification: UNCLASSIFIED
Caveats: NONE


Re: QUESTION ON CAST FRAME FLAT CARS

David
 

Looks like it was straight on the (longer) N&W GSC flats.

NWHS NW-G45137-NW Mech Dwg

 



David Thompson


Jeff Wilson's Freight Cars of the '40s and '50s

Bill Welch
 

I am curious if anyone has seen and can comment on Jeff's new book on the subject that brings many of us together on this site?


Bill Welch


Re: Boxcar Doors- Is a written dissertation avaibale?

Rhbale@...
 

Bob...

 

The door segment of the series is completed and awaiting publication in Model Railroad Hobbyist. 

 

Previous articles in the series can be accessed online as follows: 

 

Freight car trucks: http://mrhpub.com/2013-05-may/land/#69

Boxcar ends: http://mrhpub.com/2014-10-oct/land#92

Hand brakes: http://mrhpub.com/2013-11-nov/land/#110

 

After doors, the next subject will be roofs.

 

Richard Bale
Model Railroad Hobbyist magazine
Always free at mrhmag.com

In a message dated 9/15/2015 1:58:23 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

With all the various types of doors represented on box and automobile cars, has anyone prepared a document describing the types and sub categories possibly with photos and diagrams?  Something that includes the many versions of the Youngstown doors would be helpful.  I recall seeing this done for car ends, brake wheels and trucks.


Thank you,

Bob Schott


Boxcar Doors- Is a written dissertation avaibale?

bobster1269@...
 

With all the various types of doors represented on box and automobile cars, has anyone prepared a document describing the types and sub categories possibly with photos and diagrams?  Something that includes the many versions of the Youngstown doors would be helpful.  I recall seeing this done for car ends, brake wheels and trucks.


Thank you,

Bob Schott


Re: Floquil Paint Source

WILLIAM PARDIE
 

HI MIke:

I just spoke to Judy at East Dyke Depot.  She only had the Earth color.  I paid her for it plus a fee for holding
(my idea not hers).. I told her sthat someone would pick it up in the next few weeks.  She knew you by name 
and told me that I was pronouncing it wrong.

You must have told someone else about this as she said that she had just recieved a call from California.

Thanks for the help. 

Bill

On Sep 14, 2015, at 4:50 AM, Schleigh Mike mike_schleigh@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

Hello Group!

This may be of interest to some of you living in or passing through the Southern Tier of New York State.  The East Dyke Depot in Wellsville (between Hornell and Olean on the the old ERIE RR) has a small stash of the subject paint, at least more than I have seen in other shops recently.  The shop is closed Sunday and Monday but open 12-5 on weekdays and 10-3 on Saturday.  Give Judy a call at 585-593-0005 and see what is available.  I bought several of the freight car colors and there were many more of the more likely shades we have typically applied in our modeling efforts.  Judy has not normally shipped any product especially paints so you may need to work out arrangements to pick up anything you want or work out some creative process to get it.

Good luck hunting----Mike Schleigh 



Re: Simpson products

Scott H. Haycock
 

Thanks, Pierre.

If I'm converting correctly, Their smallest stock is close to 020" x .040". That's still a little larger than the smallest from Special Shapes- .015" x .030". I've earmarked the site though, and will check it for other shapes in the future. 

Scott Haycock 


 

Scott et all,
Here's the link to a European company that offers very nice flat stock.
http://www.hassler-profile.li/index.php/produkte/profileallg/flachprofil-f12
It's in German, sorry, but they have a very extensive line of brass shapes and an email will be returned in English.

Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com


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