Date   

Re: stirrup steps

paul.doggett2472@...
 

Hi Steve

Yes it is you should be able to get it in small tubes which may be more economical.

Paul 




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"'Scott H. Haycock ' shhaycock@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

Paul,

Is this the product you're referring to?

 

Scott Haycock


 


I have not been following this thread but the problem appears to not being able to get aluminium to solder to brass if you can get hold of Evo stick glue that will stick aluminium to brass or copper it creates a chemical reaction and once its stuck it stays stuck i have tried it and it works. I also knew a modeler who only built his 0 scale locos in brass,  copper and aluminium they top quality models all stuck together with Evo stick.
Paul Doggett UK




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"tgregmrtn@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 


So is there any reason we shouldn't use Aluminum as Stan Rydarowizc has done. There is a virtually an endless supply at the bottom of a pie pan. It works...
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 9/12/2015 5:27:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:

Scott, .005” is just about a half-inch in HO, so it’s really pretty accurate.  Granted it LOOKS too thin, but it is to scale for things like stirrup steps, the supports at the end of roofwalks, so on.


Schuyler





Re: stirrup steps

Scott H. Haycock
 

Paul,

Is this the product you're referring to?

 

Scott Haycock


 


I have not been following this thread but the problem appears to not being able to get aluminium to solder to brass if you can get hold of Evo stick glue that will stick aluminium to brass or copper it creates a chemical reaction and once its stuck it stays stuck i have tried it and it works. I also knew a modeler who only built his 0 scale locos in brass,  copper and aluminium they top quality models all stuck together with Evo stick.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"tgregmrtn@... [STMFC]" wrote:
 


So is there any reason we shouldn't use Aluminum as Stan Rydarowizc has done. There is a virtually an endless supply at the bottom of a pie pan. It works...
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 9/12/2015 5:27:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:

Scott, .005” is just about a half-inch in HO, so it’s really pretty accurate.  Granted it LOOKS too thin, but it is to scale for things like stirrup steps, the supports at the end of roofwalks, so on.


Schuyler





Re: stirrup steps

paul.doggett2472@...
 

I have not been following this thread but the problem appears to not being able to get aluminium to solder to brass if you can get hold of Evo stick glue that will stick aluminium to brass or copper it creates a chemical reaction and once its stuck it stays stuck i have tried it and it works. I also knew a modeler who only built his 0 scale locos in brass,  copper and aluminium they top quality models all stuck together with Evo stick.
Paul Doggett UK




Sent from Samsung mobile

"tgregmrtn@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

So is there any reason we shouldn't use Aluminum as Stan Rydarowizc has done. There is a virtually an endless supply at the bottom of a pie pan. It works...
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 9/12/2015 5:27:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:

Scott, .005” is just about a half-inch in HO, so it’s really pretty accurate.  Granted it LOOKS too thin, but it is to scale for things like stirrup steps, the supports at the end of roofwalks, so on.

Schuyler


Re: Weather-It Replacement

Bill Welch
 

A.I.M. has a line of weathering liquids in addition to their weathering powders.

Bill Welch


Re: Simpson products

peteraue
 

I don't have a shear but I can get you photo-etched strips with different widths with zero twist from shearing. Please contact me off-line.
Peter Aue


Weather-It Replacement

John Sykes III
 

Now that A-West, the manufacturer of Weather-It, is extinct does anyone here have a replacement for that product (or a home brew concoction).


I researched this online, but most model builders were using either a mixture of pigments (e.g., India ink, shoe stain or acrylic paints) in alcohol* and others were using a solution of steel wool in vinegar, but none of these work the same way Weather-It did.


Weather-It actually chemically reacted with the wood to get the "50-years outdoors patina" look in a few minutes, the other techniques are all stains.  I always go for that sun-bleached look first, then add soot, rust, skid-marks, etc. as appropriate.


Right now I need this for some laser-cut wood decks on F30a flat cars but will need it for other projects in the near future too.


-- John


* Micro-Mark's products fall into this category.


P.S. I experimented and even tried Hydrogen Peroxide in up to a 30% solution, which is Hazardous (I could make a rocket motor with that stuff), but didn't even work on these decks.


Re: stirrup steps

Greg Martin
 

OOOPPPSSSS...
 
Scott,
 
Correct but there is a multitude of other part that can be fabricated from aluminum "pie pan" parts, like the running board supports or brake platform supports, Stan told me that there were certain stirrup steps that were not commercially available that he made from aluminum pie pan stock.
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 9/12/2015 7:50:29 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
Greg,

The only problem I see is that you can't solder aluminum.



Scott Haycock


Re: stirrup steps

Greg Martin
 

 
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 9/12/2015 7:50:29 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
Greg,

The only problem I see is that you can't solder aluminum.



Scott Haycock


Re: Wanted: Sunshine NYC rebuilt boxcars

Philip Lee
 

I am a member of the NYCSHS and have created a want ad before. I didn't get any responses concerning direct sales.
-Philip Lee


Re: Bachmann gondola

Charles Tapper
 

Ed, I seem to recall the same thing, but all my references are at my other location so that is a memory only deal. I should be able to confirm this early next week. .
 
According to the PMHS online list...The 50'6" gondolas were:
 
10100-10186 were built in 1930 Greenville
18400-18649 also built in 1930 Greenville
18650-18849 were built in 1941 half by Greenville, half by Bethlehem
All 1439 cubic feet.
 
I wonder if the AMC had a hand in the 1930 cars for both Erie and PM.
 
The Bachmann car has the "bifurcated DN" pattern on the drop ends, with the split in the pressed ribs at the ends. That matches Erie 14500-14949, which is a 50'6" car built 1930. The "yoke" (er....drop end frame?)  design  and door latches are similar to the Erie design as well.  I think the folding stake pockets matched as well, from the models I have in stock. For sure the Bachmann car is an adequate stand-in for the Erie car, uneven rib spacing and all.
 
I have C&O diagram books, ORERs, and the hopper and gondola volume from the C&OHS but not with me. These should allow me to answer the question about design changes in the PM cars.
 
I do recall one picture of an ex-PM  container-equipped car at a ferroalloy plant being, I presume, loaded. There is what appears to be a "grizzly" being held by a crane over a 50' car IIRC with containers. The grizzly would reject oversize. I have often wondered how they loaded those containers....
 
Charlie Tapper



On Friday, September 11, 2015 2:03 PM, "ed_mines@... [STMFC]" wrote:


 
Haven't seem the Bachmann gon in the flesh but it might be the same as the Erie car (haven't seem the ends at all). It is out of my price range.

p. 217 1940 CBC "Fig 221 - Plan elevation and sections of Pere Marquette 70-ton 50 ft. 6 in. low-side drop-end gondola with wood floor" spacing between ribs varies from 3'9" to 3'11'. Car is not exactly symmetrical around center line - 2'1-3/4" centerline to rib to left, 1'8" centerline to rib to the right. Photo of the car on following page (18400 cap 1439) shows a car close if not identical to the Erie car!

My recollection is that PM had a second group of 50'6" gons capacity 1439 with 2 more ribs (#18650-18889?) built some time later. Found a photo of one of these cars - 18737. I really like these PM gons - they have big jack pads.

Ed Mines



Re: stirrup steps

Scott H. Haycock
 

Greg,

The only problem I see is that you can't solder aluminum.



Scott Haycock


 

So is there any reason we shouldn't use Aluminum as Stan Rydarowizc has done. There is a virtually an endless supply at the bottom of a pie pan. It works...
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 



Re: stirrup steps

Greg Martin
 

So is there any reason we shouldn't use Aluminum as Stan Rydarowizc has done. There is a virtually an endless supply at the bottom of a pie pan. It works...
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 

In a message dated 9/12/2015 5:27:46 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:

Scott, .005” is just about a half-inch in HO, so it’s really pretty accurate.  Granted it LOOKS too thin, but it is to scale for things like stirrup steps, the supports at the end of roofwalks, so on.

Schuyler


Re: Simpson products

Scott H. Haycock
 

Mike,

Special  shaps also has strips the about same size- 1/64" x 1/32". There come packaged 2-12" strips for $1.19.

Scott Haycock 


 

I did find a commercial source for flat brass strips of 0.015 x 0.030


Detail Associates
item # 229-2524

12 inches x 5 pcs @ $5.98 a pack.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi




Re: Simpson products

Charles Hladik
 

Y'all might try True Value hardware stores for phosphorus bronze strips. Ours(Lynchburg, VA.) offers them by K&S with a rather large display.
 
Chuck Hladik
Rustburg, VA.
 

In a message dated 9/12/2015 10:10:45 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, STMFC@... writes:
 

The now closed hobby shop I favored stocked flat phosphor-bronze strip[s of that sort from one of the Diesel Detailing HO companies. It might be Details Associates….. or Details West.


I can’t find a reference to the stuff on-line.

I thought I had some packages on hand, but they are eluding me.

You’ve given me a reason to get out of the house and to my new choice of a hobby shop to explore getting flat strip.

I’m off to see and hopefully I will find something, I’ll be able to report back later today.

I sure need the stuff as well.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Sep 12, 2015, at 12:47 PM, 'Scott H. Haycock wrote:


Schuyler, and Al,

I have a small shear and can make strips for my own use, if and when I run out of the Simpson product. I was hoping to locate a commercial available source to recommend to others. 


Re: Simpson products

mwbauers
 

I did find a commercial source for flat brass strips of 0.015 x 0.030

Detail Associates
item # 229-2524

12 inches x 5 pcs @ $5.98 a pack.

Best to ya,
Mike Bauers
Milwaukee, Wi

On Sep 12, 2015, at 1:24 PM, Mike Bauers wrote:

The now closed hobby shop I favored stocked flat phosphor-bronze strip[s of that sort from one of the Diesel Detailing HO companies. It might be Details Associates….. or Details West.

On Sep 12, 2015, at 12:47 PM, 'Scott H. Haycock wrote:


Schuyler, and Al,

I have a small shear and can make strips for my own use, if and when I run out of the Simpson product. I was hoping to locate a commercial available source to recommend to others. 


Re: Stirrup Steps

Scott H. Haycock
 

Andy,

This sounds interesting. Do you know where more information on this technique may be found?

Scott Haycock


 

At this point I wish to remind those who are aware of; and those who may not have heard of Jack Spenser's Mylar corner sill steps (terminology). He uses various thicknesses of Mylar, which cuts very well with scissors, and holds shape, even when twist-bent 90º. He uses a contact cement (maybe Barges?) to affix to the car body. He is not limited to available commercial steps, and he makes any variation of corner sill steps. thought I would share....
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA



Re: stirrup steps

Scott H. Haycock
 

 See Schuyler Larabee's comment below.

I agree. my concern is the fragility of stock that thin for corner steps. I'm working on a way to cut my own strips, trying .005" and .010" brass as well as .006" phosphor bronze. I have a shear that works well, but I'm trying to find s way to do this using common tools that most modelers own.

Eric Hansmann tells me that these type of double steps are common in his era on other cars, besides reefers, so if I can figure this out, it will have more uses to modelers in this group, than just the use I have for these steps. Eric also said he would put my technique on his blog, when I have a presentation ready.

 

Scott Haycock


 

Scott, .005” is just about a half-inch in HO, so it’s really pretty accurate.  Granted it LOOKS too thin, but it is to scale for things like stirrup steps, the supports at the end of roofwalks, so on.

 

Schuyler

 



Stirrup Steps

Andy Carlson
 

At this point I wish to remind those who are aware of; and those who may not have heard of Jack Spenser's Mylar corner sill steps (terminology). He uses various thicknesses of Mylar, which cuts very well with scissors, and holds shape, even when twist-bent 90º. He uses a contact cement (maybe Barges?) to affix to the car body. He is not limited to available commercial steps, and he makes any variation of corner sill steps. thought I would share....
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA


Re: stirrup steps

Schuyler Larrabee
 

Scott, .005” is just about a half-inch in HO, so it’s really pretty accurate.  Granted it LOOKS too thin, but it is to scale for things like stirrup steps, the supports at the end of roofwalks, so on.

 

Schuyler

 


Subject: Re: [STMFC] stirrup steps

 

 

I use the Yarmouth steps too, But they don't have one with the double step, like you see on reefers.

 

I have some of the special shapes product as well, But I was hoping to find something .010" or less in thickness. I've cut some strips from .005 stock, but that seem a little too thin. If nothing else comes up, I'll try the Special shapes product.

 

 

 

Scott Haycock

 


 

The Yarmouth stirrup steps are exquisite.

 

Special shapes sells 1/32 (.030) X 1/64 (.015) inch milled brass "bars" and Detail Associates sells something similar.

 

Brass shim stock can be cut with a paper cutter but it's hard to control the width of slivers and they tend to curl.

 

Remember the aluminum Tuttle stirrup steps? Very nice but easy to bend and they didn't hold paint well.

 

Ed Mines

 


Re: Simpson products

Pierre Oliver
 

Scott,
I have the website of an outfit in Lichtenstein that offers what you`re looking for.
It`s on my home computer and I`m in Montreal for the weekend. I`ll try and remember to dig it out for you when I get home.
Send me a note offlist to remind me and I`ll be sure to get you the link
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 12/09/2015 5:03 AM, shhaycock@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

I have a couple of packages of a product from the 1970's IIRC, by a company called Simpson, from Pacific House, CA. They are brass strips, .006" (actual) x 3" (HO scale). The package shows them as being useful for making stirrup steps in HO/HOn3.


This is exactly what I'm using them for. My Question: does anyone know of a source for a similar product?


Strips of brass of similar dimension are hard to produce without a shear. I'm working on a technique to construct 2-rung sill steps using this material, and hope someone may know of a ready-made source.


Scott Haycock


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