Date   

Re: Lindberg stock car

rwitt_2000
 

Ed,

I looked at my old notes about this Lindberg model which later also was offered by Mantua in their  "Heavy" Line.

The best match I could ever find for the prototype was a RDG  19000  series built ~3-1924 with an IL of 38-ft.

An article in the out-of-print Kalmbach "Easy to Build Rolling Stock" had a drawing and an article to scratch build one.

The end door and bracing on the model closely match the drawing except the old Lindberg model is too tall, too long and too wide.

John Swanson article in the January 1991 RMC shows how to convert the model to a MILW prototype.

Here's the best photo I could quickly find ...

Photo by Tony Cook

 


Regards,

Bob Witt


 


Re: Broadway Limited 6000 gallon chemical tank car

Bill Welch
 

Gene, yes please, I want the Brown tank car, a Virginia company.

Bill Welch


Re: Funaro & Camerlengo kit box chronology(?)

 

Keith – Gray resin is white resin with black dye added.  - Al Westerfield
 
 

Sent: Friday, September 4, 2015 9:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Funaro & Camerlengo kit box chronology(?)
 
 

First, thank you to all for your inciteful and helpful responses to my inquiry.

 
I would like to ask about "white resin" and why it is "good to go". Are the yellow resin kits a problem? What about grey?
 
Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL


---In STMFC@..., wrote :

The Boxes are of no real consequence as long as the resin is white you are good to go.

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 

 


Re: Funaro & Camerlengo kit box chronology(?)

hvyweight41
 

First, thank you to all for your inciteful and helpful responses to my inquiry.

I would like to ask about "white resin" and why it is "good to go". Are the yellow resin kits a problem? What about grey?

Thanks,
Keith Kempster
Jacksonville, FL


---In STMFC@..., <prrk41361@...> wrote :

The Boxes are of no real consequence as long as the resin is white you are good to go.

 

Brian J. Carlson, P.E.

Cheektowaga NY

 

 


Re: Car Service Rules

Jim Betz
 

Hi all,

  Dan Holbrook's response below seems to imply that the RRs went thru
ever further reaching sources of supply to "fill an order".  I'm sure that
really happened from time to time - but I am wondering if those layers of
sources were used simply in order to meet the "car service rules" for a
box car ... 

  Let's set up a situation where a shipper somewhere on the West Coast
asks the SP for a box car to go to the East Coast.  Let's suppose that the
shipper is a plywood mill in Roseburg, Oregon.  Unless I'm taking Dan's
comments out of context he seems to imply that the SP would fill that
order first from whatever cars are in Roseburg, next from whatever cars
are in Eugene, and lastly from cars on adjacent divisions. 
  That's well and fine for a special car such as a depressed center flat.
But wouldn't the SP provide "the closest box car it can find"?  What I'm
asking is that if there was an empty -box car- right there in Roseburg
then wouldn't that car have been used ... "regardless of what the car
service rules would dictate" (i.e. no matter what road name it wore)?
  Certainly if there were two empties in Roseburg and one was an East
Coast car and the other was not ... then the East Coast car would be the
choice (assuming that the car service rules were followed). 

  And what would be the situation where that same East Coast box car
would -not- be selected?  For instance, let's say that some West Coast
car (an SP?) was to be picked up at another industry that would be
worked before the plywood mill ... and the East Coast car was at a 3rd
industry that would be worked after the mill ... wouldn't the RR use
the 'easier' car rather than come back to the plywood mill to deliver
the East Coast box car 'just' to follow the car service rules? 
  Who would make the decision(s) in this case?  The conductor or the
car clerk in the office (who is not there)?
  Would the SP change the order that industries were worked 'just' (?)
in order to satisfy the car service rules?  This seems possible for one
or two cars but could result in a significant increase in the time it
takes for the local working those industries to complete the work if
there were very many 'swaps' from one industry to another.
                                                                                                                - Jim B. 

On 9/3/2015 2:31 PM, STMFC@... wrote:
6a. Re: Car Service Rules
    Posted by:  lstt100@... lstt100@...
    Date: Thu Sep 3, 2015 1:39 pm ((PDT))

I'll add to Tony's comments based on my 42 year railroad career, which predates list, but I was hanging around with agency and car distributors as early as 1964 and did do car ordering, supply and distribution.



Under Car Service Rule 15 which stated "shippers were responsible for making a request with local agents concerning cars needed for loading, a specific date, the commodity to be loaded and the destination of the car." This information was placed on a request for empties form, each railroad had a different variations, but they all had them.  Lacking a car on hand at the station, the request was forwarded to local yard and or the car distributor in attempt to locate and appropriate car.  Lacking a car on the division the request was escalated to adjacent divisions.  Once an appropriate empty was found, even if it involved a backhaul, it was sent to the station for loading.  Agent noted the car on his industry request form noting the car initial and number that was provided for the specific load.  Car Service Division liked to go thru these reports and audit them for compliance.
                    ... snip ...


Re: Funaro & Camerlengo kit box chronology(?)

dale florence <dwwesley@...>
 

I don't know about exploding paint and solvents, I only use acryilics. About all the other stuff, I am guilty


From: Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] ;
To: ;
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Funaro & Camerlengo kit box chronology(?)
Sent: Fri, Sep 4, 2015 5:09:27 PM



Insurance companies don't like a lot of boxes lying around. They become fire hazards. I do not keep empty boxes, the risk is to great


    They probably don't like paint and solvents around, either; better get rid of them all. And books and magazines are flammable, so they really better go too. In fact, clothing and bedding burns pretty well, so you will want to remove most or all of those items too. Eventually you might be fire-safe.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history







Re: white lines on boxcar doors and other markings

mark <caboose9792@...>
 

AAR's "Manual of standards and recommended practices"  in the 1977 edition its section L - Lettering and marking cars

Ive been looking for earlier editions but have had no luck.


mark Rickert
caboose9792@...


-----Original Message-----
From: blindog@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...>
To: STMFC
Sent: Tue, Jul 7, 2015 11:34 am
Subject: [STMFC] white lines on boxcar doors and other markings

 
If memory serves, a horizontal white line on the main door of a boxcar meant it had auto loading racks inside. And there are other markings refering to load restraining devices. What I can't remember is in which book should I be looking for this info. I thought it was in the ORER, but a look in a 1965 edition turned up nothing.

Also, the notes section for NYC's automobile cars, such as the 52000-series, says most have F type auto racks and a few have G type racks, but I didn't find anything telling me what the differences are between the racks. My guess is F=Ford and G=GM, but those words aren't very long so why didn't they just spell it out?

Scott Chatfield


undec HO AAR alt std 2-bay hopper kits-Intermountain

Andy Carlson
 

Hi-
Intermountain made their most recent HO car, the AAR Alternate standard 2-Bay hopper, with different detail parts to accurately model the various roads which had these cars.

These kits come with photo-etched brass details, wire grabs and various detail parts germaine to specific variations. Comes with Intermountain's 70-ton trucks. MSRP of $24.95 each.

Offered for $37 for 2 kits, plus shipping of $5.85. I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee I also accept PayPal. If interested,or if you want more than 2 kits, contact me off-list (please) at


Thanks,
-Andy Carlson
Ojai CA










Re: Broadway Limited 6000 gallon chemical tank car

Tony Thompson
 

Gene Green wrote:

 
I am going to order Variety Pack A of the 6000 gallon tank cars from Broadway Ltd. so I can get the Ethyl Corporation tank car.  If anyone would like to buy one or more of the other three cars (Brown, Shippers or Stauffer), once they have arrived and I've received mine, I'll let them go for $25 each plus shipping.

   Does anyone want to split up any of the other BLI four-packs? I might be interested in participating.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Freight Car truck Question from John Henderson's Vol. 1

Bill Welch
 

My question has been answered.

Bill Welch


Re: mortuary trains

Charles Peck
 

Here is a link to photos of  WWII mortuary cars.
Not coaches, Pullmans with windows blanked.
Charles Peck, a respectful vet.

On Fri, Sep 4, 2015 at 6:58 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

In a photo circa 1948 it looks like many of the cars are coaches which seems odd to me considering the passengers.


Are the cars from different railroads like on wartime military trains? Would off road cars be loaded when the caskets enter the US? Would cars be changed going from one railroad to another?


Apologies to anyone who thinks this discussion is outside of this groups charter.


Ed Mines



Re: mortuary trains

Patrick Wade
 

At this site there is an excellent article on mortuary trains. The cars appear to be coaches with a sliding door near one end and the windows plated over.



Pat Wade
Santa Barbara, CA

On Fri, Sep 4, 2015 at 3:58 PM, ed_mines@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

In a photo circa 1948 it looks like many of the cars are coaches which seems odd to me considering the passengers.


Are the cars from different railroads like on wartime military trains? Would off road cars be loaded when the caskets enter the US? Would cars be changed going from one railroad to another?


Apologies to anyone who thinks this discussion is outside of this groups charter.


Ed Mines



Re: MONON box cars

Craig Zeni
 

On Sep 4, 2015, at 4:04 PM, STMFC@yahoogroups.com wrote:

2. MONON box cars
Posted by: "Thomas Baker" bakert@andrews.edu northstarlimited
Date: Fri Sep 4, 2015 7:16 am ((PDT))

Group,


I have seen a photo of a MONON 50-foot double-door box car. From looking at the photo, I would say the doors are seven foot each, leaving an opening of fourteen feet for loading. The number on the car is 1271. Would cars in this series have a diagonal panel roof or a rectangular panel roof?
Probably photo of 1571...from my buddy Jim Smith, Monon freight car guy:

MON 1271 is a 40 foot car w/ a 6 foot door -- and marked for appliance loading at appliance park, KY

MON 1371 is a 50' w/ 8' door

MON 1500-1599 were double door cars; had 7.5' doors (15' opening). Had diag panel roofs.

Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Re: Alcohol Shipments, was Pacific Northwest WWII was Lumber Traffic

John Barry
 


 
John Barry ATSF North Bay Lines Golden Gates & Fast Freights 707-490-9696 PO Box 44736 Washington, DC 20026-4736



From: "railsnw@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, September 3, 2015 3:42 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Alcohol Shipments, was Pacific Northwest WWII was Lumber Traffic

 
A mention was made about transporting alcohol from the Pacific Northwest. In the SP&S Railway Historical Society Archives at the Pacific Northwest Railroad Archives we have Secretary Files that have yearly permits starting from the mid 1930's in to the 1960's  that read as follows but with a different year:

Permit with United States of America (Treasury Dept.) - Permit C-Ore-4-54 (Internal Revenue Service) to transport tax free alcohol and specially denatured alcohol during the year 1954

The ones that have been cataloged are mostly for the Oregon Trunk. Where was this alcohol coming from?

Richard Wilkens



mortuary trains

ed_mines
 

In a photo circa 1948 it looks like many of the cars are coaches which seems odd to me considering the passengers.


Are the cars from different railroads like on wartime military trains? Would off road cars be loaded when the caskets enter the US? Would cars be changed going from one railroad to another?


Apologies to anyone who thinks this discussion is outside of this groups charter.


Ed Mines


Lindberg stock car

ed_mines
 

Looks very nice for an older model.


Ed Mines


F&C twin tank car

ed_mines
 

The floor seems  to be about 2mm too long. Am I missing something?



Ed Mines


Broadway Limited 6000 gallon chemical tank car

genegreen1942@...
 

I am going to order Variety Pack A of the 6000 gallon tank cars from Broadway Ltd. so I can get the Ethyl Corporation tank car.  


Variety Pack A includes Brown Company, Shippers Car Line, Ethyl Corp., and Stauffer Chemical.  The Stauffer Chemical tank car has the full platform while the Brown Company and Shippers Car Line do not.  


If anyone would like to buy one or more of the other three cars (Brown, Shippers or Stauffer), once they have arrived and I've received mine, I'll let them go for $25 each plus shipping.


Gene Green

Out in the Badlands of New Mexico


Re: Lumber moving on the Overland Route in '49

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <brockm@...> wrote :

Box Cars also win. UP had one flat car in train 3, SP had 2 in train 3, PM
had one flat in train 3. The well known photo of the flats carrying lumber
on the SP made me expect to see more flats carrying lumber on the Overland
Route.
==========

We've discussed this before, and I believe the consensus of opinion was open lumber loads were more common on the west coast. I don't know why, but a couple reasons come to mind: Milder weather, and shorter transit times.

By the time you get to the Chicago market, it seems open loads are only rough plank and timbers; items on which the effects of weathering was allowable.

Dennis Storzek


Freight Car truck Question from John Henderson's Vol. 1

Bill Welch
 

In the process of "The Reluctant Weatherer's" overcoming his fear of weathering he has been going through some of his older models as inititial candidates for treatment and in the process finds himself doing small upgrades like improved sill steps and switching trucks with more accurate editions where available. Thank you Tahoe and Brian!


Perhaps my first kitbash (20+ years ago) involved an Athearn 40-ft steel boxcar, some Detail Associates Dreadnaught ends and resin Murphy ends to create a rebuild owned by the Columbus & Greenville and inspired by a photo in Volume One of the recently discussed Color Freight Car book series. Currently it rides on (predictably) some Athearn trucks. I cannot find my copy of the book in question but I am wondering if anyone who can find their Vol. 1 can assist me with what in their opinion might be a better truck, especially if they are familiar with Tahoe's line. The car did not live on the C&G during my 10-1955 time period but mysteriously the reweigh and lube dates do not reflect this anomoly. Go figure.


Instead of cluttering this Group with answers, please email The Reluctant Weatherer at fgexbill(at)tampabay.rr.com


Thank you!

Bill Welch

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