Date   

Re: Evangeline Railway

Paul Doggett
 

Jim 

Thank you I will pass this on to my Louisiana friend.
Paul Doggett 


On 30 May 2020, at 16:48, James Yaworsky <jyaworsky@...> wrote:


Here's what Wikepedia has to say, which explains why "Evangeline" is a factor in both Canada's Maritime Provinces, and in the American State  Louisiana:

The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present-day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.[b] The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War)[c] and was part of the British military campaign against New France. The British first deported Acadians to the Thirteen Colonies, and after 1758, transported additional Acadians to Britain and France. In all, of the 14,100 Acadians in the region, approximately 11,500 Acadians were deported.[8][d] A census of 1764 indicates that 2,600 Acadians remained in the colony having eluded capture.[10]

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the British captured Port Royal, the capital of the colony, in a siege. The 1713 Treaty of Utrecht, which concluded the conflict, ceded the colony to Great Britain while allowing the Acadians to keep their lands. Over the next forty-five years, however, the Acadians refused to sign an unconditional oath of allegiance to Britain. During the same period, some also participated in various military operations against the British, and maintained supply lines to the French fortresses of Louisbourg and Fort Beauséjour.[11] As a result, the British sought to eliminate any future military threat posed by the Acadians and to permanently cut the supply lines they provided to Louisbourg by removing them from the area.[12]

Without making distinctions between the Acadians who had been neutral and those who had resisted the occupation of Acadia, the British governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council ordered them to be expelled.[e] In the first wave of the expulsion, Acadians were deported to other British North American colonies. During the second wave, they were deported to Britain and France, and from there a significant number migrated to Spanish Louisiana, where "Acadians" eventually became "Cajuns"


Evangeline is a fictional character in a long (and famous) poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, published in 1847.  She has become a symbol of Acadian (and Cajun) society ever since.   In addition to the railway in Canada, one of VIA Rail's name trains (discontinued a while ago presumably due to budget cuts) was named after "her" as well.

 Jim Yaworsky


Re: IM Parts Sprues [was New IM Cars Arrive]

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Bill,

I was aware IM had recently stopped selling their bagged parts. What I was talking about were unpackaged sprues. These had to be ordered by telephone (or maybe email), and AFAIK were never offered from a catalog or web site. You simply told one of the nice ladies on their order desk that you wanted a dozen ladder, car end, roof or running board sprues from Kit X, and they took care of it for you. It's probably been 10 or more years since I ordered, and I still have pretty good stock of what I need, except I'm running low on PS-1 ends and had a couple more conversions of old Front Range cars I wanted to do. (That's how I did my CNW and IC riveted PS-1s.). Those are the breaks I guess.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆

On Sat, May 30, 2020 at 9:03 AM Bill Welch <fgexbill@...> wrote:
In one of their monthly email announcements IM said they would no longer be selling parts.

Bill Welch


FGEX 11158

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
I like the stenciling that sez “When empty return to Pennsylvania R R Indianapolis IND” on FGEX 11158
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


Re: Evangeline Railway

James Yaworsky
 

Here's what Wikepedia has to say, which explains why "Evangeline" is a factor in both Canada's Maritime Provinces, and in the American State  Louisiana:

The Expulsion of the Acadians, also known as the Great Upheaval, the Great Expulsion, the Great Deportation and Le Grand Dérangement, was the forced removal by the British of the Acadian people from the present-day Canadian Maritime provinces of Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and northern Maine — parts of an area also known as Acadia.[b] The Expulsion (1755–1764) occurred during the French and Indian War (the North American theatre of the Seven Years' War)[c] and was part of the British military campaign against New France. The British first deported Acadians to the Thirteen Colonies, and after 1758, transported additional Acadians to Britain and France. In all, of the 14,100 Acadians in the region, approximately 11,500 Acadians were deported.[8][d] A census of 1764 indicates that 2,600 Acadians remained in the colony having eluded capture.[10]

During the War of the Spanish Succession, the British captured Port Royal, the capital of the colony, in a siege. The 1713 Treaty of Utrecht, which concluded the conflict, ceded the colony to Great Britain while allowing the Acadians to keep their lands. Over the next forty-five years, however, the Acadians refused to sign an unconditional oath of allegiance to Britain. During the same period, some also participated in various military operations against the British, and maintained supply lines to the French fortresses of Louisbourg and Fort Beauséjour.[11] As a result, the British sought to eliminate any future military threat posed by the Acadians and to permanently cut the supply lines they provided to Louisbourg by removing them from the area.[12]

Without making distinctions between the Acadians who had been neutral and those who had resisted the occupation of Acadia, the British governor Charles Lawrence and the Nova Scotia Council ordered them to be expelled.[e] In the first wave of the expulsion, Acadians were deported to other British North American colonies. During the second wave, they were deported to Britain and France, and from there a significant number migrated to Spanish Louisiana, where "Acadians" eventually became "Cajuns"


Evangeline is a fictional character in a long (and famous) poem by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, published in 1847.  She has become a symbol of Acadian (and Cajun) society ever since.   In addition to the railway in Canada, one of VIA Rail's name trains (discontinued a while ago presumably due to budget cuts) was named after "her" as well.

 Jim Yaworsky


Re: SHPX 161, a two compartment tank car

Douglas Harding
 

Claus that is a two compartment tank car, one large and one small compartment. You can tell by the rivet lines around the tank.

 

 

Doug  Harding

www.iowacentralrr.org

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2020 10:10 AM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] SHPX 161, a two compartment tank car

 

Hi List Members,

 

Nice image of SHPX 161, a two compartment tank car.

 

I suspect this car may have been built originally as a three compartment car, based simply on the location of the two domes. Can anyone confirm (or deny) this to be the case?

 

 

The car looks o have a 1930 build date on it, on the right hand side of the tank

 

Enjoy!

 

Claus Schund

 


image of UTLX 22747

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Even though this image of UTLX 22747 was taken in 1973, it would certainly have been rolling the rails during ‘our time’.
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


SRLX 61172 meat reefer yellow paint scheme

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Derailment photo of SRLX 61172 meat reefer yellow paint scheme, along with a PRR friend
 
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schlund
 


SHPX 161, a two compartment tank car

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,
 
Nice image of SHPX 161, a two compartment tank car.
 
I suspect this car may have been built originally as a three compartment car, based simply on the location of the two domes. Can anyone confirm (or deny) this to be the case?
 
 
The car looks o have a 1930 build date on it, on the right hand side of the tank
 
Enjoy!
 
Claus Schund
 


Rock Islan flats

cmrp48
 

Thanks to all who responded to my request.  Questions have been  answered.
Thanks again.
Robert Leners


Re: IM Kits, Was New IM cars arrive

Fred Swanson
 

Ii guess it would help if I put the link in.  https://www.intermountain-railway.com/ho/hokit.htm
Fred Swanson


Re: IM Parts Sprues [was New IM Cars Arrive]

Bill Welch
 

In one of their monthly email announcements IM said they would no longer be selling parts.

Bill Welch


Re: Evangeline Railway

Paul Doggett
 

Hi Don 

I think you are thinking of Louisiana sand and gravel (I think it was called) own by Polson Spence he had 3 NKP Hudson’s among other engines unfortunately he dropped dead on Penn station and most of the collection went for scrap but a SP 4-4-0 and a couple of other small engines were saved.

Regards Paul Doggett.   England 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 


On 30 May 2020, at 13:29, Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt@...> wrote:



Hi Paul,

    Gravel pit operation you write in reference to the Evangeline Rwy. in Louisiana. That strikes a 
familoar chord and make me wonder if this operation might have had more than one name over 
the years if it is the operation I am thinking of in whch the owner bought a number of used steam
locomotives to use largely because he likes steam! Wonder if we are thinking of the same operation.
Perhaps sme of our y'all members might know and respond.

Cordialy, Don Valentine


Re: Evangeline Railway

Donald B. Valentine
 

Hi Paul,

    Gravel pit operation you write in reference to the Evangeline Rwy. in Louisiana. That strikes a 
familoar chord and make me wonder if this operation might have had more than one name over 
the years if it is the operation I am thinking of in whch the owner bought a number of used steam
locomotives to use largely because he likes steam! Wonder if we are thinking of the same operation.
Perhaps sme of our y'all members might know and respond.

Cordialy, Don Valentine


Re: Photo: UP "See Though" Boxcar 195220

Enzo Fortuna
 

hO bOB
This is the "IMPACT" car :
Originally built in the mid-1940s for Union Pacific, this 40’ box car was later converted in 1952 into an impact instruction car at the Omaha shops. Serving to illustrate the importance of safe car handling, this car had a transparent sidewall to show cargo movement, along with force and speed gauges displayed on the side

Southern Pacific® coverted this 50’ box car with plexi-glass on one side and standard solid steel on the other. It became known as the ‘Impact’ car used for freight protection instruction - switchmen and trainmen oberved the effect of coupling whne speeds exceed the safe limit of 4 miles per hour or more. To demonstrate the impact, loose skids, cartons, or barrels would be placed inside the car and a ‘handling thermometer’ measures the damage, an impact speed indicator (speedometer) measures the coupling speed.

MicroTrains have done" an N scalemodel... I miss !
https://www.micro-trains.com/index.php?_route_=union-pacific-impact-car-rd-195220-rel-8-18-02000157
Cheers and stay safe
Enzo Fortuna
Modeling Espee in Italy


Re: Evangeline Railway

Paul Doggett
 

Hi Don 

I also found the Evangeline Railway in Canada but it was the one in Louisiana which my friend was looking for apparently it was a gravel pit operation.

Regards Paul Doggett 


On 30 May 2020, at 12:49, Donald B. Valentine via groups.io <riverman_vt@...> wrote:


Hello Paul,

    Either I've learned something new, which is usually a good thing, out of this thread or 
some ar barking up the wrong tree. I had not hear of the Evangeline Rwy. before but in
Louisiana the origin of he name is quite obvious. However, the Canadian Pacific, long a
favorite of British investors, had a subsidiary in Nova Scotia with wich the parent CPR 
directly connected only by passenger ferry from St. John, NB to Digby, NS, all freight
car traffic connecting via the CNR. The Nova Scotia subsidiary was the now gone
Dominion Atlantic Rwy. for which several of my grandmother's family worked for years.
The DAR was commonly known as the Route of Evangeline and an artist's rendition of
Evangeline was incorporated into the hearld of the road. Thus is becomes appaent that 
we had at one time both an "Evangeline Rwy." and a "Route of Evangeline" several 
thousand miles apart. For our period of modeling the DAR did have a number of CPR
Dominion cars carrying their own DAR reporting marks which, if I'm not mstaken, are
covered by Andrew's Westerfield cars in HO scale.

Cordially, Don Valentine


Re: Evangeline Railway

Donald B. Valentine
 

Hello Paul,

    Either I've learned something new, which is usually a good thing, out of this thread or 
some ar barking up the wrong tree. I had not hear of the Evangeline Rwy. before but in
Louisiana the origin of he name is quite obvious. However, the Canadian Pacific, long a
favorite of British investors, had a subsidiary in Nova Scotia with wich the parent CPR 
directly connected only by passenger ferry from St. John, NB to Digby, NS, all freight
car traffic connecting via the CNR. The Nova Scotia subsidiary was the now gone
Dominion Atlantic Rwy. for which several of my grandmother's family worked for years.
The DAR was commonly known as the Route of Evangeline and an artist's rendition of
Evangeline was incorporated into the hearld of the road. Thus is becomes appaent that 
we had at one time both an "Evangeline Rwy." and a "Route of Evangeline" several 
thousand miles apart. For our period of modeling the DAR did have a number of CPR
Dominion cars carrying their own DAR reporting marks which, if I'm not mstaken, are
covered by Andrew's Westerfield cars in HO scale.

Cordially, Don Valentine


IM Parts Sprues [was New IM Cars Arrive]

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

Several times in the past I ordered parts sprues from IM. IIRC, you had to order a dozen or more at a time, but that actually worked out pretty well if you were ordering say PS-1 or AAR boxcar ladders.

With all their production now done in China, I presume that those sprues are no longer available at all.

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  


Re: Seeking Photo Help:

Brad Andonian
 

Why is there a vent in the second picture....?

Thanks,


Re: Photo: Unloading Gasoline

Dave Parker
 

Well, Steve, obviously my copy of the book is not as well-thumbed as it should be.  But I am glad to now have the TIFF from the LOC, as it always gladdens my heart to see the Class X and V cars in service.  ;-)
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA


Re: Photo: Unloading Gasoline

Steve and Barb Hile
 

We did use this photo, and one from Richard Hendrickson on the next page (81-82.)  Basically, the three course 6500 gallon tank was replaced by a four course 8000 gallon tank on the same underframe.  I am not sure how much of the original tank was reused in the process.

 

Thanks for the plug.

 

Steve Hile

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Parker via groups.io
Sent: Friday, May 29, 2020 1:28 PM
To: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io
Subject: Re: [RealSTMFC] Photo: Unloading Gasoline

 

Google is our friend.  It took a couple of steps, but that's an LOC FSA pic from WWII that you can find here:

https://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/fsa/item/2017871450/

The 19 Mb TIFF version has a LOT more detail!

I defer to Steve Hile, but UTLX  19656 seems to be a bit of an oddball.  Steve's 1938 roster indicates these were early 6500-gal X-3 cars, that received new 8000-gal tanks ca. 1930.  Note the tank has four longitudinal  courses, which none of the "conventional" X-3s had.  This might explain the rather curious 1918 build date.

The two cars in front of 19656 both look like UTLX Class X (or XX) cars, 6500 gallons.

Great photo that I had not seen before; thanks for posting Bob.
--
Dave Parker
Swall Meadows, CA