Date   

Re: Wabash Home Built War Emergency Boxcar in Primer

cv4559@...
 

Great modeling, thanks for sharing.

Nate Gould

Putnam, Conn


ACL O-17 Ventilation Box Car - "Watermelon Car"

wrlyders
 

I am trying to scratch build the ACL Watermelon Car starting with an Ambroid Kit from the 50s [One of my Cars for my NMRA AP Cars certificate]. This kit has all the wood pieces but no car details like the brakes, wheels, etc., nor are they described in the brief kit instructions

 

From my research, I have some pictures and have an idea of which details I need. But I don’t have specific types or sizes of the following:

·         Side Grab irons: 18”, 21”, or 22” or another size

·         Door Grab Irons: size

·         Ladders on the end: 7 rungs, 8 rungs. I assume metal ladders, not wood

·         Brake System – Brake gear, Cylinder, reduction valve, etc.

·         Brake handle on end above the roof

·         Door handles, rollers, etc.

·         Connectors for brake lines underneath and up the size

·         Underbody parts layout and detail [the kit shows some but not all detail parts]

I need pictures or drawings or parts lists showing these items in order to scratchbuild or purchase these parts. I found the ACL/SAL Historical Society and the NC Transportation Museum web sites devoid of rolling stock details.

 

Does anybody have any links or information that I can use?

 

Thank you in advance,

 

Bill Lyders

 


Photos: C&O Ventilated Boxcars 86796 & 86602

Bob Chaparro
 

Photos: C&O Ventilated Boxcars 86796 & 86602

Undated photo from the Columbus Metropolitan Library:

https://digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org/digital/collection/transport/id/8406/rec/1184

https://digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org/digital/collection/transport/id/8409/rec/1190

These are very clear photos and can be enlarged quite a bit.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Virginian Freight Cars

Garth Groff and Sally Sanford
 

Friends,

I'm taking a brief break from the C&O, and today offering three Virginian photos for your interest and approval. All photos were taken circa 1982-1985 or so by myself.

Pulpwood car 809 was spotted in the NS (ex-N&W) yard at Crewe. According to my trusty October 1958 ORER, this car was from series 800-834. Between the bulkheads it was 42 1/2 feet with an overall length of 46 feet and a capacity of 110,000 pounds. In 1958 the Virginian rostered just 77 LP flat cars. How many were left by 1985 is unknown, but 809 was probably one of the last, and actually this car may have been in the dead line.

Hopper 1112 came from series 1000-2499. It was 40 feet inside, with a volume of 2573 cubic feet and a capacity of 140,000 pounds. Note the repair plates along the bottom of the car side. I found this car on the rarely-used interchange track between the NS (ex-Southern) and CSX (ex-C&O) in Charlottesville also around 1985. This is certainly unusual, but maybe it held a special grade of coal of some sort (it is loaded). It does prove that you could have an occasional VGN hopper car off home rails.

Hopper 27116 came from series 27000-27499. It is a 33' IL car with a volume of 2041 cubic feet and a capacity of 110,000 pounds. I found this one at the NS (ex-N&W) coal yard in Norfolk in 1982 or 1983. A few Virginian cars still showed up there, as did some from the Nickel Plate Road, but these were actually NS home-road cars by then. Sadly, this shot isn't in very good focus. One of the lens elements in my Canon FTB had shifted, though I didn't know it. I shot quite a few fuzzy shots with the 50 mm lens (it worked fine with wide-angle and telephoto lenses).

Yours Aye,


Garth Groff  🦆


KITs On E-bay

Dennis Storzek
 

Just a reminder, I am selling a bunch of KITS on e-bay. Auctions ending this Sunday include Red Caboose Pennsy X29 and Mather Reefer KITS. Sunday afternoon I will be launching actions for early Intermountain KITs. Search my seller name, model-men. Don't forget the hyphen.

Everybody stay safe this Memorial Day.

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photo: DT&I Boxcar 8425 (Built 1893)

San Antonio & San Francisco
 

Bob, et al,

Here is a close-up for you. Also included the work derrick.

Levi


Re: ID needed

erieblt2
 

Thank you Tony. I based my comments on what I saw on Long Island in the 50’s. Makes sense that if an unusual cold snap, or heat blast hit-then adjustments would be required. I appreciate the input. Bill S.


On May 21, 2020, at 11:59 AM, Tony Thompson <tony@...> wrote:


"Some produce didn’t need icing-just air flow. Potatoes, and I believe onions among the produce were so shipped."

     This comment is misleading. Every type of produce had a preferred shipping temperature and the range was very broad, from 33 degrees to 65 degrees or more (Fahrenheit). In the fall, cooler weather meant that crops like potatoes and onions, at the upper end of those temperature ranges, could be shipped with ventilation only and achieve the desired temperatures. But that depended on outside temperature, so a blanket statement that a kind of produce "didn't need icing" cannot be general.
      The USDA table of those temperatures is on page 345 of the PFE book.

Tony Thompson




Re: SHPX ORER help needed

Daniel A. Mitchell
 

Minor point …

The LVT4 had no significant gun nor armor. It was an open-top troop transport vehicle, with a stern ramp.

The first successful LVT was the LVT1 that was a militarized version of an amphibious swamp buggy, the “Alligator”. The LVT1 completely changed amphibious assaults, but as a military vehicle it left a LOT to be desired. Among other problems, it had no stern ramp (Marines had to jump over the side to get out). It was soon followed by a much improved version, the LVT2 which also lacked a stern ramp.

The came the LVT4 which did include a stern ramp making for safer and faster exit.

The need for firepower resulted in the so called “Amtanks” with gun turrets and some (not much) armor. First were the LVTA-1 (37mm gun), and later  LVTA-4 (75mm short barreled howitzer).

All these types saw considerable service in the pacific invasions. The later LVT4 and LVTA-4 were mainly used at Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

Dan Mitchell
==========.

On May 21, 2020, at 2:03 PM, Bob Chaparro via groups.io <chiefbobbb@...> wrote:

Some background on FMC:

The California Fruit Growers Exchange encouraged the Food Machinery Corporation to enter the field of citrus machinery. FMC started as a national consolidation of various manufacturers of vegetable drying and packing equipment, fruit canning machines, and agricultural spray pumps. Many citrus packing houses operated with FMC equipment.

In 1940, FMC helped design a light amphibious tracked vehicle. The government gave FMC the contract to build military versions of the vehicle, with an assembly line in Florida and another in Riverside.

Several types of the Landing Vehicle, Tracked (LVT, also known as the Water Buffalo) were produced, with Riverside responsible for the gun turret version, the LVT-4. The Riverside main plant also manufactured

spare parts for the vehicles.

During World War II, FMC built 11,251 LVT vehicles, receiving in 1945 the Army-Navy "E" award for outstanding war production. Changing its name to the Food Machinery and Chemical Corporation in 1948, operations continued during the

Korean War with retrofitting of the older LVT models and also building different vehicle types. In 1949 a monument, complete with LVT, was dedicated to the factory war workers at Fairmount Park (Riverside, CA) near the location where they had conducted testing.

The FMC Corporation (its moniker since 1961) continued operations worldwide with its chemical divisions, military contracts (including ones for the M113 and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle), and its agricultural and machinery systems.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA



Re: What kind of truck is this?

Eric Hansmann
 

That is a PSC arch bar truck. Bethlehem Car Works offers them. They are item #135 on this webpage. Scroll down a bit to find it.
https://bethlehemcarworks.com/trucks/

 

I installed a pair under a Westerfield Models B&O M-15-D boxcar a few months ago, as can be seen on the attached image.

 

 

Eric Hansmann

Murfreesboro, TN

 

 

 

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io <main@RealSTMFC.groups.io> On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 2:00 PM
To: STMFC <RealSTMFC@groups.io>
Subject: [RealSTMFC] What kind of truck is this?

 

Not a typical arch bar truck.

 

On a B&O N-8 hopper, photo from the Columbus OH. Library.

 

Dave Nelson


Re: What kind of truck is this?

Jack Burgess
 

I don’t know the name of that truck but the Yosemite Valley Railroad had some hopper cars purchased second-hand which were originally built for the Great Northern Railway. They were, I think, made by Pressed Steel which built those hopper cars. Trucks are available from Wiseman Model Services as Kit OT5301 (assembly required).

 

Jack Burgess

 

From: main@RealSTMFC.groups.io [mailto:main@RealSTMFC.groups.io] On Behalf Of Dave Nelson
Sent: Thursday, May 21, 2020 12:00 PM
To: STMFC
Subject: [RealSTMFC] What kind of truck is this?

 

Not a typical arch bar truck.

 

On a B&O N-8 hopper, photo from the Columbus OH. Library.

 

Dave Nelson


Re: Canadian National 7-panel Howe Truss Boxcars Help

Marc Simpson
 

Bill, 

Ted Culotta has an article in the November 2003 Railroad Model Craftsman about these cars.  As others have said CN had both steel and wood doors that got swapped around over the years, so you could justify any combination.

--
Marc Simpson


Re: Canadian National 7-panel Howe Truss Boxcars Help

Donald B. Valentine
 

In response to Bill Welch's question Jim Brewer's wrote:

"In Ted Culotta''s Steam Era Freight Cars Seminar Manual he has a photo of CN 503559, built in 1929 and it does have wood doors.  There is also a photo of CN 506951, built in 1930, with steel doors.  Ted references an article in Railmodel Journal, June 1994, by Stafford Swain.  You can view, but not print it, 

To which I would add that if it would help, Bill, I can photocopy Stafford's articles on these and similar cars including a few 
pages on the cars right from the builder's matieral. All I'd need is a snail mail address. It's here but can't ut my hand right on it.

My best, Don Valentine.


What kind of truck is this?

Dave Nelson
 

Not a typical arch bar truck.

 

On a B&O N-8 hopper, photo from the Columbus OH. Library.

 

Dave Nelson


Re: Photo: Pacific Electric Flat Car 3643 (F-50-8)

Tony Thompson
 

Bob Chaparro wrote:

Photo: Pacific Electric Flat Car 3643 (F-50-8)

A 1923 photo from the Columbus Metropolitan Library:

https://digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org/digital/collection/transport/id/2444/rec/599


    This builder photo is in my Volume 3 of the series, _Southern Pacific Freight Cars_ for anyone who may have the book.

Tony Thompson




Photo: DT&I Boxcar 8425 (Built 1893)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: DT&I Boxcar 8425 (Built 1893)

A photo from the Columbus Metropolitan Library:

https://digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org/digital/collection/transport/id/4630/rec/22

This is a very clear photo and can be enlarged quite a bit.

My thanks to Bill West on the PRR Group for the link tip.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Photo: Pacific Electric Flat Car 3643 (F-50-8)

Bob Chaparro
 

Photo: Pacific Electric Flat Car 3643 (F-50-8)

A 1923 photo from the Columbus Metropolitan Library:

https://digital-collections.columbuslibrary.org/digital/collection/transport/id/2444/rec/599

This is a very clear photo and can be enlarged quite a bit.

My thanks to Bill West on the PRR Group for the link tip.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: ID needed

Tony Thompson
 

"Some produce didn’t need icing-just air flow. Potatoes, and I believe onions among the produce were so shipped."

     This comment is misleading. Every type of produce had a preferred shipping temperature and the range was very broad, from 33 degrees to 65 degrees or more (Fahrenheit). In the fall, cooler weather meant that crops like potatoes and onions, at the upper end of those temperature ranges, could be shipped with ventilation only and achieve the desired temperatures. But that depended on outside temperature, so a blanket statement that a kind of produce "didn't need icing" cannot be general.
      The USDA table of those temperatures is on page 345 of the PFE book.

Tony Thompson




Re: SHPX ORER help needed

Bob Chaparro
 

Some background on FMC:

The California Fruit Growers Exchange encouraged the Food Machinery Corporation to enter the field of citrus machinery. FMC started as a national consolidation of various manufacturers of vegetable drying and packing equipment, fruit canning machines, and agricultural spray pumps. Many citrus packing houses operated with FMC equipment.

In 1940, FMC helped design a light amphibious tracked vehicle. The government gave FMC the contract to build military versions of the vehicle, with an assembly line in Florida and another in Riverside.

Several types of the Landing Vehicle, Tracked (LVT, also known as the Water Buffalo) were produced, with Riverside responsible for the gun turret version, the LVT-4. The Riverside main plant also manufactured

spare parts for the vehicles.

During World War II, FMC built 11,251 LVT vehicles, receiving in 1945 the Army-Navy "E" award for outstanding war production. Changing its name to the Food Machinery and Chemical Corporation in 1948, operations continued during the

Korean War with retrofitting of the older LVT models and also building different vehicle types. In 1949 a monument, complete with LVT, was dedicated to the factory war workers at Fairmount Park (Riverside, CA) near the location where they had conducted testing.

The FMC Corporation (its moniker since 1961) continued operations worldwide with its chemical divisions, military contracts (including ones for the M113 and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle), and its agricultural and machinery systems.

Bob Chaparro

Hemet, CA


Re: Canadian National 7-panel Howe Truss Boxcars Help

ed_mines
 

There was an article on these cars along with drawings in Mainline Modeler.


Re: TNM hopper car suitable model

Tim O'Connor
 


I think that's an Enterprise door mechanism - like the one in the Tichy USRA kit.


On 5/20/2020 4:48 PM, Nathan Obermeyer via groups.io wrote:

In 1953 the Texas New Mexico Railroad received 200 70-ton hopper cars (road numbers T-NM 100-299) (later T-NM 500000-500183) built by the Texas and Pacific Railroad at Marshall, Tx. I'd like to see if there is a suitable HO scale model that one of these cars can be built. Is this car a AAR design like the Atlas Trainman AAR 70-ton hopper? Did any other model manufacturer produce a similar hopper car? I've attached the Mopac diagram for the car and an image of the car. Thanks,

Nate

--
Tim O'Connor
Sterling, Massachusetts