Date   

Re: Photos from Prototype Rails 2015

Jon Miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 1/15/2015 1:40 PM, 'Aley, Jeff A' Jeff.A.Aley@... [STMFC] wrote:
That said, the caption does not indicate that Frank Hodina is actually the man behind Resin Car Works, but it does say that the tank cars were brought by Bill Darnaby.


    Is "Resin Car Works" up and running yet?  As these will be outstanding models I sure don't want to miss any.

-- 
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax  Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Ye Old X29

Bruce Smith
 

Hey Dennis,

I think about tanks… you know… 3” or more.  So 1/2”… that seems pretty thin to me <VBG>!  X29 patch panels do have an obvious step and weld fillet (not weld bead) with the original side plates.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 15, 2015, at 3:38 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:






---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :
"Semantically speaking, they don’t have to be any particular thickness.  However, to be prototypic thickness they would need to be around 0.009” for 3/4” plate and 0.006” for 1/2” plate steel."

1/2" plate... 3/4" plate? Seriously? It always amazes me, for as picky as the RPM guys claim to be, how clueless they are about material sizes. Most prototype steel boxcars were sheathed with 10 ga. steel, which, at about .135" thick, is just a bit thicker than 1/8". This would properly represented in HO by material .002" thick... yeah, heavy foil. Even if one wanted to bump the thickness up a bit so it doesn't get buried in paint, .003 or .004 would be about the max.

That's not saying that Pierre's product won't be that thickness, as I believe Peter has done some etching work with .005" stock. Pierre?

Dennis Storzek 




Re: Ye Old X29

Pierre Oliver
 

Hi there!
I can't help much on this one just yet. I've yet to see the patch panels in person or as a photo. And I can't recall what thickness they are etched in. Sorry.
Please be patient and all will be revealed.
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 1/15/2015 4:38 PM, destorzek@... [STMFC] wrote:

 




---In STMFC@..., wrote :
"Semantically speaking, they don’t have to be any particular thickness.  However, to be prototypic thickness they would need to be around 0.009” for 3/4” plate and 0.006” for 1/2” plate steel."

1/2" plate... 3/4" plate? Seriously? It always amazes me, for as picky as the RPM guys claim to be, how clueless they are about material sizes. Most prototype steel boxcars were sheathed with 10 ga. steel, which, at about .135" thick, is just a bit thicker than 1/8". This would properly represented in HO by material .002" thick... yeah, heavy foil. Even if one wanted to bump the thickness up a bit so it doesn't get buried in paint, .003 or .004 would be about the max.

That's not saying that Pierre's product won't be that thickness, as I believe Peter has done some etching work with .005" stock. Pierre?

Dennis Storzek


Re: Photos from Prototype Rails 2015

Aley, Jeff A
 

Hi Tim,

 

               Depending on how you are viewing the photos, there are captions which describe each image – who is the modeler, etc.  I leave it to your expertise to figure out how to turn the captions on.

 

               That said, the caption does not indicate that Frank Hodina is actually the man behind Resin Car Works, but it does say that the tank cars were brought by Bill Darnaby.

 

Regards,

 

-Jeff

 

 

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2015 11:55 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Photos from Prototype Rails 2015

 

 


Beautiful photos! Who brought all the awesome tank car models?? Is that
resin dome casting one of Frank Hodina's?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lhs65/15649510214/in/set-72157649858738599

Tim O'Connor


Some photos from Prototype Rails 2015 last week end in Cocoa Beach are now available for viewing on my Flickr site:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lhs65/sets/72157649858738599/show

As always, any additions or corrections to my descriptions will be greatly appreciated.

Gary Bechdol

Stone Mountain, GA


Re: Ye Old X29

Dennis Storzek
 




---In STMFC@..., <smithbf@...> wrote :
"Semantically speaking, they don’t have to be any particular thickness.  However, to be prototypic thickness they would need to be around 0.009” for 3/4” plate and 0.006” for 1/2” plate steel."

1/2" plate... 3/4" plate? Seriously? It always amazes me, for as picky as the RPM guys claim to be, how clueless they are about material sizes. Most prototype steel boxcars were sheathed with 10 ga. steel, which, at about .135" thick, is just a bit thicker than 1/8". This would properly represented in HO by material .002" thick... yeah, heavy foil. Even if one wanted to bump the thickness up a bit so it doesn't get buried in paint, .003 or .004 would be about the max.

That's not saying that Pierre's product won't be that thickness, as I believe Peter has done some etching work with .005" stock. Pierre?

Dennis Storzek


Re: NYC box car photo

Ed Hawkins
 

On Jan 15, 2015, at 3:01 PM, richtownsend@netscape.net [STMFC] wrote:

Out of curiosity, how was the roof different? Was it just a welded variation on the typical roof with bow-tie panels, or is it somehow more different?
Richard,
The roof sheets were welded together with seam caps taller than on the riveted PS-1 roofs and wrapping around the edge just a bit. The roof was also welded to the side plate and ends. It had the normal "bow-tie" corrugations on all but the far end panels. Clark indicated to me that Stan Rydarowicz makes a resin casting for this roof.

Tim O'Connor supplied an overhead view he found on ebay of NYC 167144 taken probably in the late 1960s (ACI label on it). The photo from Cobles General Store very nicely illustrates the roof.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: [EXTERNAL] (was Athearn) container gondolas (UNCLASSIFIED)

Bruce Smith
 

Gene,

I’m not sure about “dedicated” - you just needed a crane.  A truck crane would do.  I do know that containers were used for LCL of many manufacturing materials such as metalurgic ores, coal and coke where a full hopper load was not needed.  As such these cars served small specialized foundries and so probably make excellent cars for small industries.  The PRR may even have had multiple delivery stops for their cars so that one bon might serve several foundries.  AFAIK, the containers were not tied to a specific gon, so once unloaded that gon could be used to pick up containers somewhere else, or take the empties from the same industry.  On the PRR the gons were in container service and so were unlikely to be used for other cargos.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 15, 2015, at 1:53 PM, genegreen1942@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:



Apropos lifting lugs; doesn't that imply that the containers would be removed from the gondolas for loading or unloading or both?  Wouldn't that further imply that dedicated facilities for loading and unloading would be needed at each end?  Doesn't that get one into an industry large enough to warrant special cars that can't be loaded in both directions, with some sort of crane at each end, a significant amount of traffic and, in general, something on the large size for a small model railroad.

Gene Green
Out in the Badlands of New Mexico




Re: NYC box car photo

Allan Smith
 

There is a photo of NYC 167458 on page 57 of the Dec. 1988 Model Railroading. This is part of the series Pullman Standard PS-1 40' Boxcars.

Al Smith Sonora CA


Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: (was Athearn) container gondolas (UNCLASSIFIED)

Carl Gustafson
 

On Thu, Jan 15, 2015 at 11:53:52AM -0800, genegreen1942@yahoo.com [STMFC] wrote:
Apropos lifting lugs; doesn't that imply that the containers would be removed from the gondolas for loading or unloading or both? Wouldn't that further imply that dedicated facilities for loading and unloading would be needed at each end? Doesn't that get one into an industry large enough to warrant special cars that can't be loaded in both directions, with some sort of crane at each end, a significant amount of traffic and, in general, something on the large size for a small model railroad.
My understanding of the cement container business is that the containers would come (from the cement
area around Portland, Pa) into the New Jersey docks, then get floated across the river to the
Manhattan piers. The containers would then be transported (by truck?) to the construction site to be
mixed up and used as needed.

The same railroads also transported cement in approx. 1900 cu. ft. covered hoppers, and presumably
bags in box cars.

Ron Parisi (maybe not spelled right) gave an presentation on how he made his containers/gondolas at
the last Valley Forge RPM. His models were present in the model room. He's very entertaining, to say
the least.

Carl Gustafson


Re: NYC box car photo

Richard Townsend
 

Out of curiosity, how was the roof different? Was it just a welded variation on the typical roof with bow-tie panels, or is it somehow more different?
 
Richard Townsend
Lincoln City, Oregon
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: Ed Hawkins hawk0621@... [STMFC]
To: STMFC
Sent: Thu, Jan 15, 2015 9:56 am
Subject: Re: [STMFC] NYC box car photo


On Jan 15, 2015, at 10:57 AM, cepropst@q.com [STMFC] wrote:

I bought the NYC decal set from Ted at CCB. It wasn’t till I got home that I could look up the number of the car I wish to model. NYC 167138 series 167000-167999. Therefore I missed out on looking through Bob’s NYC binders.
I did find a photo of a tank car I’ modeling and two other photos from his ‘new’ binders.
 
I believe this car is an early PS1. I would like a photo so I can check out details that may or may not have been on these cars. Like, corner sill tabs, straight stiles on the end ladders, etc.
 

Clark,
You are correct that it's an early PS-1, built ca. 3-48, Pullman-Standard lot 5904. The only two photos I've found from NYC 167000-167999 are on page 99 of the 1949/1951 Car Builders' Cyclopedia and a 1960 repaint of 167210 (Paul Dunn photo, Bob Lorenz collection).

This series was one of 9 series of PS-1s built in 1947-1948 having a Pullman-Standard welded roof (same type roof as on CGW 93001-93500 built in 1947 among others).

This roof is quite different than the common P-S riveted roofs found on PS-1s built in 1947-1949 (lacking the corrugation on the far end panels) or the more common P-S riveted roofs found on PS-1s built in 1950 and after (like the roof on the Kadee model).

If this early P-S welded roof has been offered in HO scale, I'm not aware of it.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins


Re: Ye Old X29

Bruce Smith
 

Bare metal foil.  I used a knock off of that on an X29 that I did in the PRRPro X29 project and I think was published in TKM .  Works great - the rivets from below show right through.  Painting was a pain because the foil was metalic and silver.  Ultimately, I painted the car silver and then pre-shaded the panel lines and patch panel with black Sharpie marker before painting Freight Car Color (FCC).  That worked great.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 15, 2015, at 2:41 PM, 'Hunter, James R.' jhunter@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

There is also a foil material which is used by automobile modelers to represent chrome, and which Bill Darnaby once used to put a patch on a W&LE X29-type car.  I can't recall the name of the stuff, but I tried it once successfully.  I figure it could be cut into different shapes and lengths as well.

 

I'm also intending to model an X29 that needs patching but hasn't been shopped yet.   


Re: NYC box car photo

Clark Propst
 

Thanks Ed,
Stan Rydarowicz sells a resin early roof. Didn’t one of the early (separate detail) plastic models have the early roof? I’m sure I remember doing a car in a later paint scheme, before learning about the differences in the roofs. Usually don’t forget those types of screw ups :  ))
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Ye Old X29

naptownprr
 

sorry,  forget to sign that last.

 

Jim Hunter


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2015 3:41 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: RE: [STMFC] Ye Old X29

 

There is also a foil material which is used by automobile modelers to represent chrome, and which Bill Darnaby once used to put a patch on a W&LE X29-type car.  I can't recall the name of the stuff, but I tried it once successfully.  I figure it could be cut into different shapes and lengths as well.

 

I'm also intending to model an X29 that needs patching but hasn't been shopped yet.   


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2015 3:20 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Ye Old X29

 

No to mention that there were many different patch patterns of one or more panels, but not complete sides.  The etched panels come in single panels and full sides make a wide range of possible combos by combing or timing etched parts.  Now, what I really want to see is someone do the original patch panels, which were inside the old panels


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 15, 2015, at 1:48 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Jim

True, and RC did a good job -- but it's only ONE of the carbody styles and
they made 4 different bodies (1923, 1924, 1928 and a version with dreadnaught
ends). 1950's modelers need to patch all of them.

Tim O'Connor


I'm sure the etched panels are beautiful, but you should know that Red Caboose released a run of X29 with a 'patch' side: RC-7201.

Jim Hunter



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Posted by: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
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Re: Ye Old X29

asychis@...
 

FYI,  The Amarillo Railroad Museum has Red Caboose X29's with patch panels both the Merchandise scheme (white banner, 12 numbers) and express boxcars (six numbers) in the shadow keystone scheme.  www.amarillorailmuseum.com.
 
Jerry Michels


Re: Ye Old X29

naptownprr
 

There is also a foil material which is used by automobile modelers to represent chrome, and which Bill Darnaby once used to put a patch on a W&LE X29-type car.  I can't recall the name of the stuff, but I tried it once successfully.  I figure it could be cut into different shapes and lengths as well.

 

I'm also intending to model an X29 that needs patching but hasn't been shopped yet.   


From: STMFC@... [STMFC@...]
Sent: Thursday, January 15, 2015 3:20 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Ye Old X29

 

No to mention that there were many different patch patterns of one or more panels, but not complete sides.  The etched panels come in single panels and full sides make a wide range of possible combos by combing or timing etched parts.  Now, what I really want to see is someone do the original patch panels, which were inside the old panels


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 15, 2015, at 1:48 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Jim

True, and RC did a good job -- but it's only ONE of the carbody styles and
they made 4 different bodies (1923, 1924, 1928 and a version with dreadnaught
ends). 1950's modelers need to patch all of them.

Tim O'Connor


I'm sure the etched panels are beautiful, but you should know that Red Caboose released a run of X29 with a 'patch' side: RC-7201.

Jim Hunter



------------------------------------
Posted by: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
------------------------------------


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Re: Photos from Prototype Rails 2015

Clark Propst
 

Thanks, great shots!
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Ye Old X29

Bruce Smith
 

No to mention that there were many different patch patterns of one or more panels, but not complete sides.  The etched panels come in single panels and full sides make a wide range of possible combos by combing or timing etched parts.  Now, what I really want to see is someone do the original patch panels, which were inside the old panels

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 15, 2015, at 1:48 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Jim

True, and RC did a good job -- but it's only ONE of the carbody styles and
they made 4 different bodies (1923, 1924, 1928 and a version with dreadnaught
ends). 1950's modelers need to patch all of them.

Tim O'Connor


I'm sure the etched panels are beautiful, but you should know that Red Caboose released a run of X29 with a 'patch' side: RC-7201.

Jim Hunter



------------------------------------
Posted by: Tim O'Connor <timboconnor@...>
------------------------------------


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Re: Ye Old X29

Bruce Smith
 

Tim,

Semantically speaking, they don’t have to be any particular thickness.  However, to be prototypic thickness they would need to be around 0.009” for 3/4” plate and 0.006” for 1/2” plate steel.  I have not measured them with a micrometer but they are most likely 0.010”, as they were probably etched from 0.020” so they are pretty close to 3/4” plate.  I have not painted them yet, but they look pretty good to my eye.

Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith            

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."



On Jan 15, 2015, at 1:41 PM, Tim O'Connor timboconnor@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

Bruce

Seriously?? That's news to me... how thick are these etchings? They'd have to
be almost all thin as foil wouldn't they, like .003 or less?

Tim O'


Arved, Folks,

Just to clarify, the etched X29 patch panels that I showed at Cocoa were created by Peter Aue and will be sold through Pierre Oliverâ?Ts Yarmouth Model Works.  They are not yet available.

Regards

Bruce



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Re: Photos from Prototype Rails 2015

Tony Thompson
 

Beautiful photos! Who brought all the awesome tank car models?? Is that
resin dome casting one of Frank Hodina's?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lhs65/15649510214/in/set-72157649858738599


Bill Darnaby. And yes, they are Hodina's parts.


Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Photos from Prototype Rails 2015

Tim O'Connor
 


Beautiful photos! Who brought all the awesome tank car models?? Is that
resin dome casting one of Frank Hodina's?

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lhs65/15649510214/in/set-72157649858738599

Tim O'Connor



Some photos from Prototype Rails 2015 last week end in Cocoa Beach are now available for viewing on my Flickr site:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/lhs65/sets/72157649858738599/show

As always, any additions or corrections to my descriptions will be greatly appreciated.

Gary Bechdol

Stone Mountain, GA

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