Date   
Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

Lee Thwaits <leethwaits@...>
 

Stock cars were used for carrying cans from can company to canneries in San Jose in 1940's. Cars were lined with heavy Kraft paper. Cans were stacked on there sides and unloaded using long wood boards with handles and with large dowels sticking out at appropriate intervals for can size. Don't know if the hauls were just across town or from other areas.

Lee Thwaits

Re: [BRHSlist] 1940'S FRIENDSHIP BOX CAR

Charlie Vlk
 

There were TWO "Friendship" trains.
The one the Q painted up the XM for was the Abraham Lincoln Friendship Train. There was an earlier one that ran coast to coast
MTH has done a car in O tinplate and I did art for DeLuxe Innovations to do on their XM32 in N Scale. I don't know if its ever been done in HO
I have some material from online sources on both trains. There were some other special paint cars but good pictures are elusive
I am going to cc this post to the Steam Era Freight Car List to see if anyone there has any additional information
Charlie Vlk

On May 10, 2013, at 7:49 PM, William Barber <clipperw@...> wrote:

Ray,

Sorry, I overlooked the second line and I had not read Gerald Edgar's response. I remember the discussion he is talking about, but don't recall which list it was on. I think it was the CB&Q list.

Bill Barber
Gravois Mills, MO

On May 10, 2013, at 7:38 PM, Ray Bedard wrote:

I did say "attached" but if you look at the second paragraph, I indicated that the photo is in the PHOTOS section.
RAY

To: BRHSlist@...
From: clipperw@...
Date: Fri, 10 May 2013 19:36:14 -0500
Subject: Re: [BRHSlist] 1940'S FRIENDSHIP BOX CAR

Ray,

There is no attachment. I don't think the BRHS list is set up for that. You have to post it in the "Photos" section or attach it to a message on the CB&Q list which does allow attachments.

Bill Barber
Gravois Mills, MO

On May 10, 2013, at 3:17 PM, Zephyr fan wrote:

OK, I am attaching a photo of what is listed as a FRIENDSHIP TRAIN from 1946. Is this just someones idea of a "what if" car or did the Q really have a car painted like this?

The car can be seen in the PHOTOS section, in a folder titled FRIENDSHIP TRAIN.

Would like to know if this is a Q car.

Ray
San Jose CA


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Rail Prototype Cyclopedias for sale

Kenneth Montero
 

Dear Colleagues,

A local hobby shop, Chesterfield Hobbies (tel. 804-379-9091) is having a retirement sale scheduled to end by May 31 when the owner (Adrian Cates) retires. As of May 10, the store has the following issues of Rail Prototype Cyclopedia for sale:

Nos. 1,10, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18.

Since various participants in this group have expressed interest in acquiring these items, I thought that I would post this list. I have no financial interests in the store - I am a friend of the owner.

Please contact Adrian Cates directly regarding any sales.

Sincerely,
Ken Montero

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

james murrie
 

I saw, and have a picture somewhere, of NP stock cars being used to load grain near Grand Forks, ND. Can't remember which town it was west of Grand Forks, but it had to be between Sept 72 and Feb 77, the years I lived there.
Jim Murrie

--- In STMFC@..., "personal" <steve.sandifer@...> wrote:

Grain loading was common with the inside either covered with plywood or
cardboard. I have several photos of ATSF cars in that use.

New file uploaded to STMFC

STMFC@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the STMFC
group.

File : /Classic Basalt .doc
Uploaded by : vwzoo650 <robsmom@...>
Description : Classic 1890 era photo of Basalt CO with stockcar on the coaling trestle

You can access this file at the URL:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/files/Classic%20Basalt%20.doc

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
http://help.yahoo.com/l/us/yahoo/groups/original/members/web/index.html
Regards,

vwzoo650 <robsmom@...>

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

Tom Vanwormer
 

Tony,
Here is the photo that captures many a modeler to follow the Colorado
Midland Rwy. Note the stock car on the coal trestle, it was a common
use of the 125 stockcars owned between 1897 and 1918 during the seasons
in the spring and fall when livestock was moved to either the high
country meadows (spring) and the Denver Stockyards (fall.) The stock
car on the coal trestle from many of the car registers that have
survived seems to have been a regular occurrence during the non-stock
rush periods for transporting company coal along the line.
Tom VanWormer
Monument CO

Anthony Thompson wrote:



Steve Sandifer wrote:
Of course Tony is right.
But let's be honest, don't we all like to model the uncommon in the
name of it having a prototype and something different on our railroads?

Actually, Steve, I have long preached the importance of NOT doing
highly unusual things, or to say it another way, anything that might
require "explanation." If we wish to create the illusion of miniature
reality, we have enough compromises through selective compression and
much else, that I believe we cannot afford to add to things that may
detract from realism.

I can show records of ACL, CN, and L&N stock cars in one train on
the ATSF Brady Branch in central Texas. Unusual, yes, but for the
prototype modeler, if that is your place and date - Bingo, you need them.

I agree, and I said this.

I have records of PRR, B&O, NYC stock cars in San Bernardino.
Aberation - probably, and certainly minor in numbers compared to ATSF
(50%), UP (25%), and T&NO/SP
(11%) in those postwar records. But on at least one day in one train
traversing Cajon Pass, there was a PRR stock car, and that is all it
takes for someone to have a BLI K7 on their Cajon layout.

In this case, I disagree. Some modelers will seize on ANY single
example of something as "justification" for including it, but you are
just adding improbability to the existing compromises already present.
I think these impulses have to be resisted.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail,
thompson@... <mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com>
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Steve Sandifer wrote:
Of course Tony is right.
But let's be honest, don't we all like to model the uncommon in the name of it having a prototype and something different on our railroads?
Actually, Steve, I have long preached the importance of NOT doing highly unusual things, or to say it another way, anything that might require "explanation." If we wish to create the illusion of miniature reality, we have enough compromises through selective compression and much else, that I believe we cannot afford to add to things that may detract from realism.

I can show records of ACL, CN, and L&N stock cars in one train on the ATSF Brady Branch in central Texas. Unusual, yes, but for the prototype modeler, if that is your place and date - Bingo, you need them.
I agree, and I said this.

I have records of PRR, B&O, NYC stock cars in San Bernardino. Aberation - probably, and certainly minor in numbers compared to ATSF (50%), UP (25%), and T&NO/SP
(11%) in those postwar records. But on at least one day in one train traversing Cajon Pass, there was a PRR stock car, and that is all it takes for someone to have a BLI K7 on their Cajon layout.
In this case, I disagree. Some modelers will seize on ANY single example of something as "justification" for including it, but you are just adding improbability to the existing compromises already present. I think these impulses have to be resisted.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

Rod Miller
 

On 5/10/13 12:54 PM, Charles Hostetler wrote:
--- In STMFC@..., "mopacfirst" <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

How common was it for stock cars to be temporarily / permanently converted
to other loads?
Hi Ron,

In 1953 it turned out that about 5% of shipments that were in cars of AAR MD
"S" were shipments of "something else" (other than livestock). The
"something else" shipments included Products of Agriculture, Products of
Mines, Products of Forests, and Manufacturers and Miscellaneous:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2013/05/stock-car-shipments.html

This equates to an annual volume of 22,100 shipments of "something else" in
stock cars versus 433,700 shipments of livestock in stock cars. (Compare
also to roughly 30,000,000 total shipments in 1953.)

I am working on a follow up post that includes a break down by commodity
class and some seasonal data. For my layout setting (Milwaukee harbor) these
"something else" shipments may be the only time a stock car gets on the
tracks...

Regards,

Charles Hostetler
I read on the NPmodelers yahoogroup that newly treated
ties were often shipped in stock cars because the
creosote fumes that accumulated in enclosed cars made
for difficult unloading by hand. Stock cars offered
weather protection that wasn't available in open cars.

Rod

--

Custom 2-rail O Scale Models: Drives, | O Scale West / S West
Repairs, Steam Loco Building, More | 2014 Meet is Feb 6 - 8
http://www.rodmiller.com | http://www.oscalewest.com

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

James SANDIFER
 

Of course Tony is right.



But let's be honest, don't we all like to model the uncommon in the name of
it having a prototype and something different on our railroads?



Santa Fe only had one DL-109 and one "Blue Goose," but how many Santa Fe
modelers crave one for their layout.



Some of us look for unusual loads to put on flat cars or in gondolas. I
doubt that we ask, "Was that a unique shipment, a one of a kind?" Unique or
not, it is an interesting load and a way to show off our modeling expertise
without depending on loads from commercial suppliers that look like those on
everyone else's railroad.



I can show records of ACL, CN, and L&N stock cars in one train on the ATSF
Brady Branch in central Texas. Unusual, yes, but for the prototype modeler,
if that is your place and date - Bingo, you need them. I have records of
PRR, B&O, NYC stock cars in San Bernardino. Aberation - probably, and
certainly minor in numbers compared to ATSF (50%), UP (25%), and T&NO/SP
(11%) in those postwar records. But on at least one day in one train
traversing Cajon Pass, there was a PRR stock car, and that is all it takes
for someone to have a BLI K7 on their Cajon layout.



Santa Fe had some years with bumper grain harvests, and they brought in
every car that could carry the grain. What if for a few months ATSF took
stock cars and papered the insides and took open hoppers and put radial
roofs on them, and gondolas and threw tarps on them only to convert them
back to their original use a few months later. If that's your time period
and prototype, you can have those cars.



That for me is part of the fun and education of this hobby.



Now that the weather is heating up, I crave a stock car loaded with
watermelons.

________________________________________________________________

Steve Sandifer

12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477

713-376-0684

www.ssandifer.com



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Anthony Thompson
Sent: Friday, May 10, 2013 2:49 PM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else





Steve Sandifer wrote:
Grain loading was common with the inside either covered with plywood or
cardboard. I have several photos of ATSF cars in that use.

1955 National Car Loadings for Stock Cars
"Common?" I note that in the national car loadings, the livestock add up to
99%. And that's about what you get when you add up the non-livestock loads
(5000) out of 427,100 loads. Of course, if you model an area where this kind
of stock car loading was done, or if you model a brick plant, maybe okay,
but otherwise I would say you are stretching it if you operate more than a
VERY occasional non-livestock load in a stock car.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
<mailto:thompson%40signaturepress.com>
Publishers of books on railroad history

WESTERFIELD MODELS NATIONAL TRAIN DAY Sale

dahminator68
 

Dear Modelers:

Westerfield Models is pleased to announce that on Saturday, May 11, we
are going to have a National Train Day sale. On May 11 only, buy any 1
Westerfield Kit (westerfieldmodels.com
<http://www.westerfieldmodels.com/> ) and receive a FREE copy of our
2-1/2 Hour DVD "How to Build Our Kits" OR 1 Decal of your choice.
Appropriate shipping is charged.

This Sale offer is valid for our Website and Mailed in Orders ONLY on
May 11, 2013 from 12:01 am until 11:59 pm, Mountain Std Time. Website
orders with time stamps outside of these times will not receive the
special. Mailed in orders must be postmarked Sat, May 11 or Monday, May
13, 2013 to be valid for the sale. From the website, you can download
and print an order form. Please note that website orders will be
charged for the DVD/decal, but this charge will be refunded next week
and the shipping adjusted as needed. We accept most credit cards,
Paypal and checks.

We are also pleased to announce the Re-Release of TWO Kits in the 8100
series of USRA 46 Ft Gondolas:

#8151 - USRA Clone Gondola, B&O Flat End, #8161 -
USRA Clone Gondola, B&O Creased End.

Other Kits in the 8100 series, #8101 to #8104 are being repaired and
will be available soon.

All versions of the 3400 series PSC Ore Cars and Three versions of the
12100 series Rock Island Stock Cars are also now available.

All of our Kits are HO scale resin craftsman Kits that come with custom
decals but less trucks and couplers.

Thank you,

Andrew Dahm

westerfieldmodels@... <mailto:westerfieldmodels@...>

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., "mopacfirst" <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

How common was it for stock cars to be temporarily / permanently converted to other loads?
Hi Ron,

In 1953 it turned out that about 5% of shipments that were in cars of AAR MD "S" were shipments of "something else" (other than livestock). The "something else" shipments included Products of Agriculture, Products of Mines, Products of Forests, and Manufacturers and Miscellaneous:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2013/05/stock-car-shipments.html

This equates to an annual volume of 22,100 shipments of "something else" in stock cars versus 433,700 shipments of livestock in stock cars. (Compare also to roughly 30,000,000 total shipments in 1953.)

I am working on a follow up post that includes a break down by commodity class and some seasonal data. For my layout setting (Milwaukee harbor) these "something else" shipments may be the only time a stock car gets on the tracks...

Regards,

Charles Hostetler

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Steve Sandifer wrote:
Grain loading was common with the inside either covered with plywood or cardboard. I have several photos of ATSF cars in that use.

1955 National Car Loadings for Stock Cars
"Common?" I note that in the national car loadings, the livestock add up to 99%. And that's about what you get when you add up the non-livestock loads (5000) out of 427,100 loads. Of course, if you model an area where this kind of stock car loading was done, or if you model a brick plant, maybe okay, but otherwise I would say you are stretching it if you operate more than a VERY occasional non-livestock load in a stock car.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

James SANDIFER
 

Grain loading was common with the inside either covered with plywood or
cardboard. I have several photos of ATSF cars in that use.



1955 National Car Loadings for Stock Cars


Commodity

Loads

%


Cattle & Horses

261,100

61%


Hogs

102,600

24%


Sheep & Goats

58,400

14%


Watermelons

1,600



Brick and Tile

1,400



Sorghum grain

800



Ceramic sewer pipe

600



Tomatoes

300



Railroad ties

300



Total

427,100







________________________________________________________________

Steve Sandifer

12027 Mulholland Drive, Meadows Place, TX 77477

713-376-0684

www.ssandifer.com



From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
mopacfirst
Sent: Friday, May 10, 2013 11:29 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Post War Stock Cars used for something else





How common was it for stock cars to be temporarily / permanently converted
to other loads? This means cleaning out the critter leavings and straw, to
get to a more-or-less clean floor, and installing (or not) an interior
lining so the car could essentially become a boxcar.

I have a photo of a Rock Island (ex-MKT?) stock car with solid (plywood?)
lining sitting in a yard in Wichita so there was no clue if was converted
for grain service or some other more general loading.

As noted in the other thread on stock cars, I'm really thinking about the
end of the time period of this list.

Ron Merrick

FS New Decal Set from Mount Vernon Shops!

John S. Frantz
 

Modelers,

I just got my latest and
greatest from the printer today. So, the following are now available for
sale:

In HO Scale, H34 Covered Hoppers in the Shadow Keystone scheme. Overall
it does 4 cars as follows, 2 cars each in the "Big" Keystone with the
following classes: 1 H34, 2 H34a, 2 H34b, 2 H34c; and 2 cars in the
"Little" Keystone with the following classes: 2 H34c, and 2 H34d. More
information can be found here: http://www.mountvernonshops.com/SKH34.html

Although this set covers one scheme on the PRR for these cars from 1954-1961 due to the durability of this scheme on covered hoppers, you could see this scheme on these cars into Penn Central and even some into the Conrail
eras.

You can purchase my products by ether emailing me,
mailing me an order, or as time permits, I do post most of my decal product line
on Ebay. Prices are the same regardless of how you choose to order. Also
shipping is a flat $6.00 whether you order 1 or 10 decal sets. Please contact
me off list if interested.


Best Regards,
John Frantz

Owner,
Mount Vernon Shops
York, PA


York, PA
Crossroads of the Conrail, Western Maryland/Chessie, and Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroads.

Re: Freight Car Trucks Article Published

Guy Wilber
 

Richard's latest offering on trucks does include a couple of erroneous dates, the following two dates are corrections thereof:

All "T" "L" and "I" section trucks were prohibited in interchange on, and after, January 1, 1957.
Allied Full Cushion trucks were prohibited in interchange on, and after, January 1, 1959.


Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada

Re: Post War Stock Cars

Anthony Thompson <thompson@...>
 

Rod Miller wrote:
In Arcadia Publishing's NWP book, page 37 shows stock car MKT 47037 in a WWII era freight near Willits.
Since I model SP's Coast Division, I have pored over Coast train and yard photos for stock cars. I have found Santa Fe, UP, and D&RGW stock cars, and model those cars on my layout. I also found a MKT car in a San Luis Obispo photo, but decided it was from too far afield to be reasonably common, and did not plan to model it, but Rod's observation makes me wonder . . . nah, I have too many stock cars already.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, thompson@...
Publishers of books on railroad history

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

O Fenton Wells
 

I know the Southern used them for pulpwood in the 1920's and 1930's before
the pulpwood racks were created.
Fenton Wells

On Fri, May 10, 2013 at 12:28 PM, mopacfirst <ron.merrick@...> wrote:

**


How common was it for stock cars to be temporarily / permanently converted
to other loads? This means cleaning out the critter leavings and straw, to
get to a more-or-less clean floor, and installing (or not) an interior
lining so the car could essentially become a boxcar.

I have a photo of a Rock Island (ex-MKT?) stock car with solid (plywood?)
lining sitting in a yard in Wichita so there was no clue if was converted
for grain service or some other more general loading.

As noted in the other thread on stock cars, I'm really thinking about the
end of the time period of this list.

Ron Merrick




--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
@srrfan


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

Dave Nelson
 

This sort of information is available in the ICC 1% waybill reports (for
that matter so is the percentage of cars that travelled in this, that, or
several other categories of distance, something that is suggestive of how
far most stock travelled on 1 waybill; The 1% Waybill analysis also will
show state to state transportation, which, IIRC, will show facts like this:
most Texas livestock loads went to California).

I know I've reviewed this specific question about non-stock use (found
things like coal, coke, and melons) but offhand I don't recall now if I made
copies or not. I'll have to poke around....

Dave Nelson

-----Original Message-----

How common was it for stock cars to be temporarily / permanently converted
to other loads?
Ron Merrick

Re: Post War Stock Cars

Bruce Smith
 

Jim,

To answer your question, no, you do not have it right. Your contention is based on speculation and is bereft of any data. The data that do exist do not support your conclusions. Stock cars from west of the Mississippi River were relatively common east of the Mississippi River and certainly much farther than 200 miles east. There was significant stock traffic past Chicago etc east until the end of the stock car era. It has been my experience in viewing photos of PRR stock trains that most of these trains have multiple cars present from the big western fleets.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

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| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On May 10, 2013, at 10:01 AM, jimbetz wrote:

Hi,

I agree with what Ryan concludes about Eastern road stock cars being
out West as being "rare".
Did it happen? Yes. Was it common or even "fairly common". No. And
the closer you get to
the cut off date for this group the rarer it became.

Which, of course, begs the question "how often did Western road stock
cars show up on
the East Coast?". Was is "common", "not unheard of", "fairly rare",
or "exceedingly rare"?

(By the "East Coast" I'm talking about locations that are "East of
the Indiana/Ohio border"
and yes, I understand that anyone who lives there will be offended by
that divider because
they are firmly in the "Midwest" ... but I'm a West Coast guy and I
have my own prejudices
about what defines East and West ... just like they do. Hey, at
least I didn't say "East of the
continental divide! *G*)

Please note that, in my mind at least, the amount of traffic related
to transporting
stock used as "herd building/replacement" would be rare enough that it
didn't
really matter a whole heck of a lot in terms of "meaningful numbers".
What I'm
saying is that I -think- that by far and away the majority of stock car
movements
were related to getting stock to market (slaughter) and/or changing
pastures/feed lots.

****

So consider this scenario. Let's say we are talking the GN, NP, UP,
ATSF, or SP - all of
which had sizable stock car fleets (don't get all excited because I
didn't mention -your-
favorite West Coast RR ... this is an "example"!). So my thinking
(there's that word
again) is that it would be fairly rare to see any stock car from any of
these RRs

"significantly (more than a hundred to 200 miles) East of
the Mississippi",

Yes, it probably happened ... but it would be
"rare/exceptional/occasional". And the later
we get in the time frame of this list the more unlikely that would be -
because there was
an increase of the likelihood that they would be slaughtered and packed
"some where
along North/South line represented by the Mississippi". For instance,
although I'm
sure that there were some "stock yard operations" in/near NYC, Philly,
Boston, Cincinnati,
etc. - none of those were any where near the size of Chicago, Omaha, etc.
And that the "general practice" was to ship live stock to that
North/South corridor
and slaughter them there.
And that, as a general rule (much more common than not), that stock
cars were
mostly handled by their home roads and also returned quickly to their
home roads
rather than being used like a box car. Of course it happened (they
weren't returned
quickly and were re-used off their home roads) ... from time to time.
But that wasn't
"the norm" like it was for box cars.

Finally - yes, there was stock car traffic that was "West Coast
population centers
oriented" ... but that the majority of the traffic was "moving stock
towards the
major population area of the country" (the "East").

Again, and as the O.P. for this thread ... do I have it right?

- Jim (betz)

2.1. Re: Post War Stock Cars Posted by: "rreed_eagle"
twogreyhounds@...<mailto:twogreyhounds@...> rreed_eagle Date: Thu May 9, 2013 6:54 pm ((PDT))
Although you might see a -few- the sightings of an Eastern road stock car ... on a Western RR ... would be few and far between.

I'm late to the party here, but I think I can add a few tidbits about stock movements in the Pacific Northwest. Quite a few pictures of the Armour plant in Spokane exist. Of the hundred or so stock cars parked there, they're almost all NP with a GN, a MILW, maybe a UP peppered in - one here, one there. The NP also handled CNW stock cars painted in the yellow and green, I've seen a few oxide red ones as well. It does not appear that these cars were for Armour as I have pictures of them in Pasco. NP, GN, and even SP&S handled sizable cuts of CB&Q stock cars but I don't know where exactly they were coming from or going to. The SP&S also brought ATSF stock cars up the Oregon Truck. I've seen pictures of those cars in Pasco as well so maybe those were going to Spokane. Puget Sound area too?

On the Milwaukee Road, I can't recall seeing pictures of any foreign stock cars - just long cuts of MILW cars. I'm not saying they didn't show up, but photographic evidence suggests it may not have been a very common practice. Also on the Milwaukee, when they shipping sheep or hogs in double deck cars, it looks like sometimes they couldn't round up enough double deckers and would simply cut in enough single deck cars to make it work. Up to at least the early 1950's, the Milwaukee also handled wild horses in Montana.

Since I don't recall ever seeing an Eastern road stock car in the PNW, it would really be easy for me to say they didn't come out here - at least not enough to be photographed - but if mid-1950's wheel reports ever surfaced that notion could be blow out of the water as wheel reports sometimes have a way of setting us "experts" straight. That's why we use weasel words like "can't recall" or "looks like" or "may not"...

Ryan Reed



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: { SPAM 2 }: Post War Stock Cars used for something else

Bruce Smith
 

Ron,

On the PRR, very common. For example, during the NJ tomato harvest, stock cars were used to transport tomatoes to Campbell Soup. Think of them as ventilated box cars <G>.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

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On May 10, 2013, at 11:28 AM, mopacfirst wrote:

How common was it for stock cars to be temporarily / permanently converted to other loads? This means cleaning out the critter leavings and straw, to get to a more-or-less clean floor, and installing (or not) an interior lining so the car could essentially become a boxcar.

I have a photo of a Rock Island (ex-MKT?) stock car with solid (plywood?) lining sitting in a yard in Wichita so there was no clue if was converted for grain service or some other more general loading.

As noted in the other thread on stock cars, I'm really thinking about the end of the time period of this list.

Ron Merrick