Date   

Re: Conversion kits for SP 40' B-50-27 box cars

Andy Carlson
 

Hello Vince-

The bottom mention was a relic from an earlier posting to another group and got overlooked during proof reading. I said 6 kits because with out counting, I had easily 6 pairs of the SouthWest Scale doors, which is my limiting component. I actually had a lot more than 6 pair as even with 5 sales, I still have 4 pairs of doors left, enough for 4 final kits.

thanks,
-andy


From: "steel77086@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, November 7, 2014 7:16 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Conversion kits for SP 40' B-50-27 box cars

 
Hello Andy,
 
Let me make sure I understand: Do you have only six kits available for the SP B-50-27 ?? Or what do you mean in the last paragraph about offering  " 2 enhanced kits" ?? I want to order one or both (depending).
 
Vince Altiere
 
In a message dated 11/7/2014 12:04:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:



Hello,
I have been offering HO SP 12 panel 40' box cars until recently when two of the components became temporary unavailable. I am now prepared to offer another HO Southern Pacific 40' undec box car component kit with enhancements.      



The SP B-50-27 was the last 6' door boxcar on the SP roster, and the first SP box car to feature the diagonal panel roof. This class also debuted the 3rd variant of improved Youngstown steel door, the 4/6/6 (the -25 and -26 cars used the 5/6/5 version). This door is made in gray Styrene by SouthWest Scale Models.     

I have 6 of these kits. Components include a complete Intermountain undecorated gray'37 AAR box car kit #40799. The roof, ends, doors and ladders from this donor kit are not used and are supplemented with 1) an Intermountain 40' diagonal panel roof; 2)  a pair of Intermountain "thin"R+3/4 improved dreadnaught ends (accurately having no poling pockets); 3) a pair of Southwest Scale Models 4/6/6 IY doors; 4) two sprues of 8-rung ladders which are supplied to replace the kit's wrong 7-rung ladders (Each sprue contains 2 8-rung ladders, so two sprues are included to get the necessary four ladders).  No paint, decals, couplers, trucks or metal running boards included.     I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee I also accept PayPal.     

I am selling these 2 enhanced kits for $28/each, 1st class air mail shipping included. If interested, please contact me OFF-LIST at     
Thanks, -Andy Carlson



Re: [SPAM] Clevis Source

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

I bought some of the Grandt Line turnbuckles to make clevises because they appear lighter weight and closer to scale than Tichy turnbuckles. The packs I got were poorly cast with lots of flashing, and quite fragile, so after breaking several, I never used them as clevises, preferring the oversized Tichy instead.



Nelson Moyer







From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, November 07, 2014 9:19 PM
To: Freight Car STMFC Yahoo Group
Subject: [SPAM][STMFC] Clevis Source





A number of modelers use Grandt Line turnbuckles to create the clevis. Just cut one end off.

Gene Deimling
http:// myp48.wordpress.com <http://myp48.wordpress.com>


Clevis Source

Gene Deimling
 

A number of modelers use Grandt Line turnbuckles to create the clevis.  Just cut one end off.

Gene Deimling
http:// myp48.wordpress.com


Re: Conversion kits for SP 40' B-50-27 box cars

steel77086@...
 

Hello Andy,
 
Let me make sure I understand: Do you have only six kits available for the SP B-50-27 ?? Or what do you mean in the last paragraph about offering  " 2 enhanced kits" ?? I want to order one or both (depending).
 
Vince Altiere
 

In a message dated 11/7/2014 12:04:20 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, STMFC@... writes:



Hello,
I have been offering HO SP 12 panel 40' box cars until recently when two of the components became temporary unavailable. I am now prepared to offer another HO Southern Pacific 40' undec box car component kit with enhancements.      



The SP B-50-27 was the last 6' door boxcar on the SP roster, and the first SP box car to feature the diagonal panel roof. This class also debuted the 3rd variant of improved Youngstown steel door, the 4/6/6 (the -25 and -26 cars used the 5/6/5 version). This door is made in gray Styrene by SouthWest Scale Models.     

I have 6 of these kits. Components include a complete Intermountain undecorated gray'37 AAR box car kit #40799. The roof, ends, doors and ladders from this donor kit are not used and are supplemented with 1) an Intermountain 40' diagonal panel roof; 2)  a pair of Intermountain "thin"R+3/4 improved dreadnaught ends (accurately having no poling pockets); 3) a pair of Southwest Scale Models 4/6/6 IY doors; 4) two sprues of 8-rung ladders which are supplied to replace the kit's wrong 7-rung ladders (Each sprue contains 2 8-rung ladders, so two sprues are included to get the necessary four ladders).  No paint, decals, couplers, trucks or metal running boards included.     I accept checks and money orders. For a small fee I also accept PayPal.     

I am selling these 2 enhanced kits for $28/each, 1st class air mail shipping included. If interested, please contact me OFF-LIST at     
Thanks, -Andy Carlson


Re: Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

arved_grass
 

Thanks for the tips. I've heard about using chalk, but had completely forgotten about it!

I found a 12" Nicholson "Handy File" at the local hardware store (and I see  them at Home Depot now):

http://www.nicholsontool.com/files/american-pattern/nicholson-06686n-12-handy-file.html

What drew my attention when I first bought it was it was recommended for use on plastics and laminates. I also find it a great general purpose file. I've also wrapped the file in sandpaper to block-sand large areas, such as a splice on a kitbash.

And something both my Jr. High School shop teachers (wood and metal shop), never use a file without a handle. The tang is seriously dangerous. Even those little needle files - I make a handle out of dowel to ensure they don't slip and end up in my wrist. I know - chances are slim, but why risk it if you don't have to?
 
Arved Grass
Arved_Grass@... or Arved@...
Fleming Island, Florida


From: "Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC]"
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, November 7, 2014 6:25 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

 
As a retired machinist, I'll share a couple of tricks for files.  When going to use a file on soft material, softer than steel, say; I fill the file
with chalk. Yes, common blackboard chalk.  With the valleys full, there is much less tendency for the file to clog and become so
difficult to clear.  Between the peaks fills more quickly but that is the easy part to clear.
Next, a coarser file cuts more quickly and is easier to clean. But to use a coarse file and get a better finish, look at the direction of the
primary cuts on the file surface. When those cuts are perpendicular to the direction of travel, you get the fast rough cut. Turning the
file so the primary cuts are at a long angle to the travel, a slower but smoother cut results.  Examples are a lathe file especially made
with a long angle on the face cuts; as well as the technique of drawfiling which is holding the file fully perpendicular to the direction
of travel. This is like using a spoke plane and results in a nicer finish. 
To get a good life out of a file, never let a file touch a file. Clean it before putting it down and lay it on wood, cloth, foam or such. 
Not in a drawer full of loose files.
If your primary use of files is on plastics, lead, zamac and such, you are wasting money on high quality files. That highly tempered
tool steel is not needed on soft stuff.  You never see diamond tipped butter knifes.  Even cheap files are hard enough for such use
and can be replaced frequently.  Several times for the cost of a good file.
One big exception to that rule.  Get a large, 12 inch or so, good quality American made file for jobs like making a flat surface on a
resin model.  The usual run of files from China, India, and such often have an arch to them that makes getting something flat or
straight very difficult.
Chuck Peck
Gainesville FL 




___

.




Re: Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

Spen Kellogg <spninetynine@...>
 

On 11/7/2014 4:25 PM, Charles Peck lnnrr152@... [STMFC] wrote:
 
As a retired machinist, I'll share a couple of tricks for files.  When going to use a file on soft material, softer than steel, say; I fill the file
with chalk. Yes, common blackboard chalk.  With the valleys full, there is much less tendency for the file to clog and become so
difficult to clear.  Between the peaks fills more quickly but that is the easy part to clear.
Next, a coarser file cuts more quickly and is easier to clean. But to use a coarse file and get a better finish, look at the direction of the
primary cuts on the file surface. When those cuts are perpendicular to the direction of travel, you get the fast rough cut. Turning the
file so the primary cuts are at a long angle to the travel, a slower but smoother cut results.  Examples are a lathe file especially made
with a long angle on the face cuts; as well as the technique of drawfiling which is holding the file fully perpendicular to the direction
of travel. This is like using a spoke plane and results in a nicer finish. 
To get a good life out of a file, never let a file touch a file. Clean it before putting it down and lay it on wood, cloth, foam or such. 
Not in a drawer full of loose files.
If your primary use of files is on plastics, lead, zamac and such, you are wasting money on high quality files. That highly tempered
tool steel is not needed on soft stuff.  You never see diamond tipped butter knifes.  Even cheap files are hard enough for such use
and can be replaced frequently.  Several times for the cost of a good file.
One big exception to that rule.  Get a large, 12 inch or so, good quality American made file for jobs like making a flat surface on a
resin model.  The usual run of files from China, India, and such often have an arch to them that makes getting something flat or
straight very difficult.

Chuck,

Thank you for those comments and suggestions. They are worth their weight in gold, or completed resin cars.

Spen Kellogg


Re: Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

Charles Peck
 

As a retired machinist, I'll share a couple of tricks for files.  When going to use a file on soft material, softer than steel, say; I fill the file
with chalk. Yes, common blackboard chalk.  With the valleys full, there is much less tendency for the file to clog and become so
difficult to clear.  Between the peaks fills more quickly but that is the easy part to clear.
Next, a coarser file cuts more quickly and is easier to clean. But to use a coarse file and get a better finish, look at the direction of the
primary cuts on the file surface. When those cuts are perpendicular to the direction of travel, you get the fast rough cut. Turning the
file so the primary cuts are at a long angle to the travel, a slower but smoother cut results.  Examples are a lathe file especially made
with a long angle on the face cuts; as well as the technique of drawfiling which is holding the file fully perpendicular to the direction
of travel. This is like using a spoke plane and results in a nicer finish. 
To get a good life out of a file, never let a file touch a file. Clean it before putting it down and lay it on wood, cloth, foam or such. 
Not in a drawer full of loose files.
If your primary use of files is on plastics, lead, zamac and such, you are wasting money on high quality files. That highly tempered
tool steel is not needed on soft stuff.  You never see diamond tipped butter knifes.  Even cheap files are hard enough for such use
and can be replaced frequently.  Several times for the cost of a good file.
One big exception to that rule.  Get a large, 12 inch or so, good quality American made file for jobs like making a flat surface on a
resin model.  The usual run of files from China, India, and such often have an arch to them that makes getting something flat or
straight very difficult.
Chuck Peck
Gainesville FL 

On Fri, Nov 7, 2014 at 3:45 PM, Arved Grass arved_grass@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:
 

I think a key to those fine files is finding a card file to cleaning them. I haven't, but I've spent too many hours scraping out between the teeth using the point of a knife (usually a single edge razor blade, but sometimes a #11). I have yet to find a wire brush with fine enough wire to substitute for a proper file card for those fine files. Maybe there's one for rifling files - I need to look into that.

I have migrated most of these tasks to belt style sanding sticks. NWSL (had?) offers them in several grades that use color coded sticks, I get replacement belts from McMaster-Car. Wet sanding greatly increases the life of the sanding belt. I keep a shot glass with water at the workbench, and dip the sanding sticks into them frequently. I find myself using the 600-grit belts the most.

Another option is to scrape. Consider a hobby knife (or single edge razor) as a single-tooth file. :-) Don't underestimate this. Machinists use scraping to produce precision flat surfaces. Videos of this abound on Youtube, but this is typical:

http://youtu.be/LkdkouWiDFs

Arved Grass
Arved_Grass@... or Arved@...
Fleming Island, Florida



Re: CN SS box car roof

midrly
 

Lester--

Dennis is correct in all that he wrote.  Photos show these cars with Hutchins steel rooves.

Some of these cars had a ratchet handbrake.  I used the one off the Tichy K brake set on my model of 462176, modified from an Accurail car.  A judge at an NMRA regional remarked on the model having no brake wheel and nearly docked conformity points until Al Welch pointed out that these cars had a ratchet handbrake--I submitted a photo of the real car in the judging  documentation.

Don't forget that the sides use grab irons throughout, rather than the ladder on the Accurail car.  Drop me an email if you'd like more info such as photos. 

And thanks, Dennis, for making this model available to us!  

Steve Lucas.


Soo Line Freight Equipment and Cabooses

Ken Soroos
 

Today we received our order for <SOO LINE Freight Equipment and Cabooses>, a new book published by the Soo Line Historical and Technical Society. It covers freight equipment used by the Soo Line railroad from the early 1900s into the 2000s. There are over 550 black and white and color photos in this 152-page 8 1/2" x 11" hardbound book. We'll have them for sale at the SLHTS booth at Trainfest tomorrow and Sunday. Stop by and take a look if you're there. If interested, please e-mail me directly, OFF LIST, and I'll reply with a PDF of the descriptive flyer and ordering information. Thanks!

Ken Soroos


Re: Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I believe in quality tools when they are versatile and/or the only one to work. I paid $600 for my chop saw and consider that a great investment. So much so I need fewer other tools. The same would be true for that duo sharp stone at $100 Jack recommends. I researched and found Jack's recommendation the only one to work for steam era freight car resin kits AND my chisels, knives, and other sharpening stones. Versatility and quality are worth waiting and saving for if the use will be regular and long term.

I've cleared out my toolbox of many cheap tools I hoped would be sufficient but ended up wasting time or space and creating.frustration by not getting the job done. Cleaner, lighter toolbox with less cluttered workbench has been making me happy. That's worth $ to me. But I don't make the mistake of assuming money always equals quality. I've seen "pros" use free scrap to make excellent tools and jigs.

I'm about to build about 30 resin kits I've accumulated and the stone looks to make that process more enjoyable and hopefully I'll have better results.

I have one good mill file and the color coded sanding "sticks" with ribbon paper, plus a set of flexible diamond files that seem all I need. Until Jack publishes his next column...sigh.

Sent from Dave Bott' iPhone

On Nov 7, 2014, at 4:11 PM, jon miller atsfus@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

On 11/7/2014 9:21 AM, 'Jack Burgess' jack@... [STMFC] wrote:
the cost of a chop saw and electric drill will pay for themselves to build that benchwork.

    You can pay 20 or 200 for these saws and probably the same for drills.  I'm not talking about tool types but the cost of those types for the amount of usage.  I would hate to pay 50/100 for a diamond file I used twice.  But then I have always considered you a professional (grin)!

--

Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Andy Carlson

paul.doggett2472 <paul.doggett2472@...>
 

Hi 
    l have just ordered one of the kits that Andy posted the steam era freight car site. Its a SP  B50-27
Paul




Sent from Samsung mobile


Re: Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

jon miller <atsfus@...>
 

On 11/7/2014 9:21 AM, 'Jack Burgess' jack@... [STMFC] wrote:
the cost of a chop saw and electric drill will pay for themselves to build that benchwork.

    You can pay 20 or 200 for these saws and probably the same for drills.  I'm not talking about tool types but the cost of those types for the amount of usage.  I would hate to pay 50/100 for a diamond file I used twice.  But then I have always considered you a professional (grin)!

-- 

Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS


Re: Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

arved_grass
 

I think a key to those fine files is finding a card file to cleaning them. I haven't, but I've spent too many hours scraping out between the teeth using the point of a knife (usually a single edge razor blade, but sometimes a #11). I have yet to find a wire brush with fine enough wire to substitute for a proper file card for those fine files. Maybe there's one for rifling files - I need to look into that.

I have migrated most of these tasks to belt style sanding sticks. NWSL (had?) offers them in several grades that use color coded sticks, I get replacement belts from McMaster-Car. Wet sanding greatly increases the life of the sanding belt. I keep a shot glass with water at the workbench, and dip the sanding sticks into them frequently. I find myself using the 600-grit belts the most.

Another option is to scrape. Consider a hobby knife (or single edge razor) as a single-tooth file. :-) Don't underestimate this. Machinists use scraping to produce precision flat surfaces. Videos of this abound on Youtube, but this is typical:

http://youtu.be/LkdkouWiDFs

Arved Grass
Arved_Grass@yahoo.com or Arved@I-Do-Photography.com
Fleming Island, Florida


Re: Accurail 4211 Erie SS boxcar w wood door

Clark Propst
 

Try colored pencils on different board and Pan Pastels applied with a fan brush for better control.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Accurail 4211 Erie SS boxcar w wood door

Tony Thompson
 

David Bott wrote:

 
I followed Tony's blog entries and recent MRH articles on weathering with interest. I have previously used oils and filters per the military modeler Mig Jimenez. Previously I used a version of Jim Six's spray rust brown with airbrush and remove most with cotton swab or sponge. I've yet to find a technique I can do well, even with practice. So I try another. My first dilute gouache attempt on Athearn yellow reefer came out decent, but heavy. Wondering if it will work better on BCR paint.

     Dave makes an important point: you have to try methods until you find one that works for YOU. I once taught a hands-on adult education class on weathering (part of a semester course on model railroading at a community college), and quickly found that most students would have trouble with some techniques, but could make at least one work like a dream -- but different students were doing different things. So if you've tried various recommendations, and they just are not doing what you want, try other techniques. And there may be some parts of a technique that add to your repertoire even if your base method turns out to be something else.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Larry Kline's files? Re: Accurail 4211 Erie SS boxcar w wood door

hayden_tom@...
 


Larry Kline's files? Re: Accurail 4211 Erie SS boxcar w wood door

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I cannot seem to locate Larry Kline's files per suggestion.  I realize that Yahoo usernames are not reflective (e.g., mine is Lwulffe_doc from my WWI air combat simulation days...).

 

I found two files by a LarryLaramie, but nothing that was immediately identifiable as Larry Kline and about Accurail or SS boxcars in the 20s-early 30s  (one started at '38).

 

What am I missing?

 

Dave

P.S. there ARE some neat things in the files section.  I like the archbar truck history for example.  Just not finding what I was looking for (sort of like going through my Dad's workshop :-) )


Re: Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

Nelson Moyer <ku0a@...>
 

Jack Burgess wrote an article published in the November Railroad Model Hobbyist on files, rifflers, and reamers.



Nelson Moyer







From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Friday, November 07, 2014 9:57 AM
To: List Steam Era Freight Car
Subject: [STMFC] Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.





I have long been a practitioner of, and advocate for the purchase of, and extended -read lifetime- use of very fine hand and modeling tools. However, for years I have also been purchasing the ubiquitous vinyl folders of cheap Asian “Swiss Pattern” files, which I tend to use far beyond their probably very short useful life, because I simply do not yet know how to judge when to toss them! I end up doing a lot of collateral damage as a result. A brief Google search confirms that really-fine file sets of the same type (Swiss) cost up to about $150! Wow! How much more cutting ability, finer finish, and how much more life could I expect with such an expenditure; i.e. how much am I missing?



What choices are other listers -critical about their tools- making in this regard?



What sources exist for the really-small (2”) fine files?



What types, sizes, and cuts of files would listers currently advise as a basic set, taking into account working on resin, styrene, and brass?



Denny





Denny S. Anspach MD

Sacramento













[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: clevises (asking again)

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

It may be possible to find some appropriate
sized clevises in other disciplines such as R/C
planes/cars/boats.
Any hobby that uses servos will use clevises.
Some of the "micro servos" have arms that
would seem to need/use clevises that are
quite small.
- Jim Betz

P.S. I have not researched this and do not know
what is actually available and what isn't. The
only time I've used clevises is when they were
provided in the kit(s) I was building.


Re: Swiss pattern & other fine files. Choosing the best for model-making.

O Fenton Wells
 

Good point Jack, let's not even go to the new set of Pings or the Scotty Cameron putter!

--
Fenton Wells
5 Newberry Lane
Pinehurst NC 28374
910-420-1144
srrfan1401@...

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