Date   
Angle cock/air hose (was Re: Modeling air hoses on STMFC era cars ...)

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

--- In STMFC@..., jimbetz <jimbetz@...> wrote:
<great big snip>
And I position them "as close to the
coupler as I can ... without interfering with the coupler
swing.
<little bitty snip>

Should anyone care, the correct position of the angle cock varied over the last century. I covered that in the Underbody Detail Handout that Doug Harding posted in the files section somewhere. Measurements for the correct location for a variety of situations are in a table.

Gene Green

Re: Tankcar Challenge

Dennis Storzek
 

One more question. A.T.Kott Provided a whole list of Lot No.s for lots built in the proper time frame:

- Lot 8657 (30) White Eagle Petroleum Co. tank cars ordered 12/4/18

- Lot 8661 (3) Smethport Extract Co. 50-T 8,000 gal tank cars ordered 1/19/1919

- Lot 8670 (15) Magnolia Petroleum 40-T ? gallon tank cars ordered 4/16/1919

- Lot 8678 (10) Akin Gasoline Co. 40-T 8,000 gallon tank cars ordered 5/9/1919

- Lot 8684 (2) Kendall Refining Co. 40-T 8,000 gallon tank cars ordered 6/5/1919

- Lot 8708 (2) Kendall Refining Co. 40-T 8,000 gallon tank cars ordered 7/25/1919

- Lot 8712 (50) North American Car Co. 40-T "Type 19" 8,000 gallon tank cars ordered 7/30/1919
I am aware from Neubauers's book on ACF Centerflows that modern ACF practice was to stamp the lot number in a standard location on every car. Is it possible AC&F was doing this with tanks back in 1919? Anyone have a suggstion as to where to look?

Dennis

Re: Modeling air hoses on STMFC era cars ...

mrprksr <mrprksr@...>
 

Afternoon Guys....My 2 cents on Air Hoses....I worked 42 years as a Conductor
and coupled a helluva lot of air hoses.....The only time a glad hand at the end
of an air hose was a silver color was when they were brand new...after that they
collected all kinds of grime....I believe it was more grime than rust since they
were a metal casting...not necessarily rustable,,,,figure all the stuff trains
hit and run over...people...animals....garbage,,,,etc.....you get the idea of
why they are grime color......Larry Mennie




________________________________
From: jimbetz <jimbetz@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Sat, June 1, 2013 2:33:26 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Modeling air hoses on STMFC era cars ...


Hi,

I see a fair number of models that the guy doing it has gone
to the trouble of painting the air hoses ... but, to my way of
thinking, has gotten the colors wrong ...

The air hoses I remember seeing in the STMFC era are

A grimy black rubber hose with a rust colored fitting on the
end ... and a rust colored valve (as in both are unpainted or
what ever paint was on them is long gone. Some hoses
were that "red rubber hose" color ... but most were black.

Is this an "it depends upon which RR" thing? Or an "it
depends upon which era" thing? (I'm talking about whether
or not the fittings are painted.)

I've seen buys paint the fittings silver, red, and white fittings.
And , almost always if they use one of those colors - jet black
hoses.

I typically do mine by hitting the entire area with a grimy
black color ... and then going back and hitting the metal parts
with a "weathered rust color".
I have used almost every brand of HO scale freight car
air hoses that have ever been produced. I tend to prefer
the HiTech and then the Kadee ... but pretty much use
what ever I put my hands on first a lot of the time.
I usually glue the hoses to the underframe in such a
way that the underframe can be removed from the car
(if it is a box car or other similar model that supports
this approach). And I position them "as close to the
coupler as I can ... without interfering with the coupler
swing.

What do you do? And why, if it matters ... Jim Betz

Re: Air Slide Hoppers

Allen Cain <allencain@...>
 

Alumina was carried in these cars to smelters from the Bauxite refineries or
ports where it was processed to product aluminum ingots.



Allen Cain

Re: Modeling air hoses on STMFC era cars ...

Richard Hendrickson
 

On Jun 1, 2013, at 11:27 AM, jimbetz <jimbetz@...> wrote:
Hi,

I see a fair number of models that the guy doing it has gone
to the trouble of painting the air hoses ... but, to my way of
thinking, has gotten the colors wrong
[snip]

What do you do? And why, if it matters ... Jim Betz
Jim, the staging for my operating diorama requires the use of Kadee magnetic uncoupling, so my couplers all have operating levers, and I don't model separate air hoses so as to avoid visual clutter between the cars. I let the Kadee operating levers represent air hoses and I paint them grimy flat dark gray so they look like weathered rubber. I haven't made a practice of painting the ends to represent metal couplings, as I don't want to call attention to the fact that the "air hoses" aren't connected, but if I were going to do so, I'd use a rusty metal color, as you have. As usual, YMMV.

Richard Hendrickson



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Modeling air hoses on STMFC era cars ...

Tim O'Connor
 

Jim

Most photos I've seen show galvanized couplers on the end of
the air hose, and many angle cocks also are galvanized color.
All the components got dirty, but not rusty. They were in use
and had to function correctly - I think rust might interfere
with that. The hose with the coupling end was removable and
easily replaced in the field -- You often see discarded hoses
lying around freight yards.

Tim O'Connor

Re: Air Slide Hoppers

Charlie Vlk
 

I don’t pay much attention to “modern” (post-CB&Q) railroading, but it seems to me that the within the last few years I’ve seen the 50’ variety of the Air Slide cars in sugar and flour service at Chicago area industries. You might be right about the 40’ cars disappearing; might have to do with the preferred size of rail shipments.

Charlie Vlk

What commodities besides sugar and flour would have been typical for these
cars? Why did these cars disappear seemingly before their useful service
life was over?





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Modeling air hoses on STMFC era cars ...

Jim Betz
 

Hi,

I see a fair number of models that the guy doing it has gone
to the trouble of painting the air hoses ... but, to my way of
thinking, has gotten the colors wrong ...

The air hoses I remember seeing in the STMFC era are

A grimy black rubber hose with a rust colored fitting on the
end ... and a rust colored valve (as in both are unpainted or
what ever paint was on them is long gone. Some hoses
were that "red rubber hose" color ... but most were black.

Is this an "it depends upon which RR" thing? Or an "it
depends upon which era" thing? (I'm talking about whether
or not the fittings are painted.)

I've seen buys paint the fittings silver, red, and white fittings.
And , almost always if they use one of those colors - jet black
hoses.

I typically do mine by hitting the entire area with a grimy
black color ... and then going back and hitting the metal parts
with a "weathered rust color".
I have used almost every brand of HO scale freight car
air hoses that have ever been produced. I tend to prefer
the HiTech and then the Kadee ... but pretty much use
what ever I put my hands on first a lot of the time.
I usually glue the hoses to the underframe in such a
way that the underframe can be removed from the car
(if it is a box car or other similar model that supports
this approach). And I position them "as close to the
coupler as I can ... without interfering with the coupler
swing.

What do you do? And why, if it matters ... Jim Betz

Re: Tankcar Challange

Dennis Storzek
 

Gentlemen,

Thanks to all.

Since it seems that discussion here has ended, when I get time this weekend I'll combine the posts into one long narrative and post that back to the discussion on the Railway Preservation News board. If anyone objects to having their comments or name re-posted, please e-mail me privately at destorzek@....

And, I can't believe I misspelled the word challenge in the title :-( Where was my spel chequer when I needed it?

Dennis Storzek

Re: Air Slide Hoppers

Greg Martin
 

Bob,

Any pulverized material normally shipped by rail either in bags or covered
hopper. The issue was the maintenance pf the bladder inside the car but
they were popular railroad purchases through 1967 or so and that is beyond
the scope of this list.

Trucks were equipped with vacuums that displaced all the pneumatic cars of
that era.

Greg Martin

Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean

In a message dated 5/31/2013 5:01:26 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
thecitrusbelt@... writes:




I know that air slide hoppers came to the rails about 1955, which is the
extreme end of the era covered by this group.

What commodities besides sugar and flour would have been typical for these
cars? Why did these cars disappear seemingly before their useful service
life was over?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Air Slide Hoppers

Ed Hawkins
 

On May 31, 2013, at 7:01 PM, Bob Chaparro wrote:

I know that air slide hoppers came to the rails about 1955, which is
the extreme end of the era covered by this group. What commodities
besides sugar and flour would have been typical for these cars? Why
did these cars disappear seemingly before their useful service life
was over?
Bob,
According to GATC ads, the cars were designed to carry "dry, granular,
and powdered bulk materials" without any limitations to just food
products. While the vast majority were apparently used for flour and
sugar, at least some cars were leased to Firestone and the Chapman
Chemical Company, both of which likely carried some type of granular or
powdered material other than sugar or flour.

I'm not sure I understand your second question. The first production
Airslide 2,600 cu. ft. covered hoppers were first available for
purchase or lease in early 1954. To answer your question I cannot go
into detail because it would be off topic, but suffice it to say the
Airslide cars continued in service long after 1960.
Regards,
Ed Hawkins

Re: Tichy AB Brake Set-to scale?

Gene <bierglaeser@...>
 

I am embarrassed! Somehow I overlooked the "AB" in Bill's question, got fixated on K brakes and dug deep into my early 20th century reference material and then got carried away trying to dazzle all you good folks with my superior knowledge of air brakes. I am sorry.

Dennis is, of course, quite correct in all he writes.

Gene Green

Re: Polishing Styrene and other model materials

albyrno
 

I have some sanding films 800 - 8000 grit I got from a hobby shop,they came in a 10-pack of various grits.The link below offers several sanding film assortments reasonably priced,the 320 - 12,000 grit assortment should be all you need if you want you can get the 20,000 - 60,000 grit.. You would need a high power magnifying glass to see any scratches but it will take forever to remove material.
  Alan

http://www.flex-i-file.com/alpha/sanding-film-products.php

Re: F&C website

rwitt_2000
 

I just tried and I get a warning stating the web site has been reported
as an "attack site".

I am accessing it with a MacBook Pro MacOS 10.6.8 and Firefox 21.0.

I believe my security levels are set at around medium. I have no issues
accessing hundreds of other web sites with my settings. Maybe something
got in their web site unknown to them.

Bob Witt


--- In STMFC@..., "Pierre" wrote:

Thanks Ben.
Most curious
Pierre OLiver

--- In STMFC@..., Benjamin Hom b.hom@ wrote:

Pierre Oliver asked:
"Has anyone tried the F&C website today?
My browser and anti-virus software are blocking access. Seems
they've
been hacked or infected.
And since Sharon's not answering the phone, could they be on their
way
to another show?"

Just accessed their site with no issues.


Ben Hom

Air Slide Hoppers

Bob Chaparro <thecitrusbelt@...>
 

I know that air slide hoppers came to the rails about 1955, which is the extreme end of the era covered by this group.

What commodities besides sugar and flour would have been typical for these cars? Why did these cars disappear seemingly before their useful service life was over?

Thanks.

Bob Chaparro
Hemet, CA

Re: Tichy AB Brake Set-to scale?

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., "Gene" <bierglaeser@...> wrote:

Bill,
It is possible that all are the correct scale size.

H, J & K brakes came in a variety of sizes to suit the empty weight of the freight car (or, dare I say here, passenger car or tender). In the case of H and K brakes the cylinder diameter (actually the bore diameter) ranged from 6 inches to 16 inches in 2 inch increments.

H and K brakes were applied to freight cars; J to passenger cars.

I believe (I hate suppositions, even my own) that piston travel, and therefore cylinder length, was confined to a narrower range but can not find confirmation in any of my reference material just now.

H and K brake reservoirs could be 12"x33" used with 10" brake cylinders, 14"x33" used with 12" cylinders, 16"x33" used with 14" or 16"x42" used with 16".

In general, use the smaller K brakes on lighter freight cars and the larger on heavier freight cars. Again, it is light weight that determines cylinder size and, by extension, reservoir size. Disregard loads.

Gene Green
All that is well and good, Gene, but it's all from the early days of air brakes. By the time AB brakes were in general use, there was only one size cylinder used on freight cars, 10" diameter, 12" stroke. Differences in braking force were accommodated by properly proportioning the levers. The only exception I can think of off hand is the Soo Line wood caboose fleet, which retained their 8" x 12" brake cylinders from their K equipment. These were indeed the same cylinders, with a flat steel plate replacing the head that used to be part of the K reservoir.

Back to Bill's question, if he would have bought the '46 CBC on DVD I mentioned a while back, he could be looking at the exact same drawing I'm looking at, titled "Combined Auxiliary and Emergency Reservoir for AB 10" freight car brake equipment." It shows the overall length over the mounting lugs to be 41-7/8", and the diameter of the central flange to be 18-7/8". Typical of drawings in the CBC, since this is a proprietary assembly, they don't dimension the contours of the part itself, but scaling the drawing using the given dimensions as reference shows the tank adjacent to the flange is appx. 16.25" in diameter, tapering to appx. 15.5" where it blends into the curved ends.

Dennis

Re: Polishing Styrene and other model materials

Claus Schlund \(HGM\)
 

Hi List Members,

The sanding thread has been interesting.

I noticed years back that the finest belt that can be bought off-the-shelf for the NWSL sanding stick is 600 grit, which is too coarse for some types of work.

So, inspird by this thread, I made my own sanding belt from 1200 grit paper.I simply cut the sandpaper using a discarded X-Acto #11 blade to 1/4 inch width. Since one length of the sandpaper would not be long enough to make the entire loop, I used two segments. Made the glue joint with Walthers Goo, following the guideline that you apply the cement to both sides to be joined, let it set for about 30 minutes, then press. After that I waited overnight for max strength to set in, and it works beautifuly.

- Claus Sclund

-----Original Message-----
From: michaelegross [mailto:michaelEGross@...]
Sent: Friday, May 31, 2013 09:48 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Polishing Styrene and other model materials

Gentlemen:

In addition to the excellent wet sandpaper methods mentioned in earlier postings, I have also used toothpaste as a final polisher for plastic surfaces, as the paste contains microscopic grit. I apply it in a circular motion with the top of a flat pencil eraser, and the residue easily washes off with water. For a slightly larger grit, use baking soda and water.

Cheers!

Michael Gross
La Cañada, CA






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: F&C website

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Thanks Ben.
Most curious
Pierre OLiver

--- In STMFC@..., Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:

Pierre Oliver asked:
"Has anyone tried the F&C website today?
My browser and anti-virus software are blocking access. Seems they've
been hacked or infected.
And since Sharon's not answering the phone, could they be on their way
to another show?"

Just accessed their site with no issues.


Ben Hom

Re: F&C website

Benjamin Hom
 

Pierre Oliver asked:
"Has anyone tried the F&C website today?
My browser and anti-virus software are blocking access. Seems they've
been hacked or infected.
And since Sharon's not answering the phone, could they be on their way
to another show?"

Just accessed their site with no issues.


Ben Hom

Re: F&C website

James Fellows
 

They are at the New England Proto Meet in Collinsville, CT.



Jim Fellows

----- Original Message -----


From: "Pierre Oliver" <pierre.oliver@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Friday, May 31, 2013 3:40:26 PM
Subject: [STMFC] F&C website

 




Has anyone tried the F&C website today?
My browser and anti-virus software are blocking access. Seems they've
been hacked or infected.
And since Sharon's not answering the phone, could they be on their way
to another show?
Thanks

--
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]