Date   
Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

C J Wyatt
 

I have a WAG.

It's the old land a plane on a moving train stunt. After landing the wings were
removed for clearance to where the plane could be off-loaded.

Jack Wyatt

Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 30, 2013, at 8:49 AM, Jon Miller <atsf@...> wrote:

On 5/30/2013 3:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:
If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."
SWAG; Given the era it's possible that with no overhead problems the
plane might have been transported a short distance (x miles). Not sure
that a truck, at that time and road conditions, could have done the job.
Looking up E.W. Wiggins in Wikipedia has some interesting
information. Could we assume the picture is 1929+?
Yes. The Piper Cub was introduced in the mid-1930s.

Richard Hendrickson

Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 30, 2013, at 6:14 AM, Bruce F. Smith <@smithbf> wrote:

I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.

I will suggest another, though perhaps unlikely, explanation for the platform, which is - as Bruce says - substantial, and runs the full length of the box car roof. What may be going on here is the aftermath of a stunt that is still performed from time to time at air shows in which the pilot of a Piper Cub (or similar light aircraft with a very slow stall speed) lands the aircraft on a platform on top of a pickup truck while the truck is moving just slightly faster than the the airplane's stall speed. A rail car moving at ca. 40 mph would have provided an equivalent landing platform back when there were very few paved airport runways on which a truck could operate at such speeds. Today when this stunt is performed the airplane takes off again after landing on the platform, so that doesn't explain why the wings have been removed from the Cub in the photo and it is being rolled off the car roof on what is obviously temporary planking. But it is possible to land a Cub on a small platform atop a moving vehicle, and it is still being done today.

Richard Hendrickson

Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Benjamin Hom
 

Jon Miller wrote:
"Could we assume the picture is 1929+?"

Yes.  Additionally, the earliest model of the Cub was introduced in 1935.

Ben Hom

Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Bruce Smith
 

Jon,

The reweigh date on the BAR car is October 1937.


Regards

Bruce


Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/


"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On May 30, 2013, at 10:49 AM, Jon Miller wrote:

On 5/30/2013 3:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:
If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

SWAG; Given the era it's possible that with no overhead problems the
plane might have been transported a short distance (x miles). Not sure
that a truck, at that time and road conditions, could have done the job.
Looking up E.W. Wiggins in Wikipedia has some interesting
information. Could we assume the picture is 1929+?

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Steven D Johnson
 

The re-weigh date on the boxcar in the side view is 10-37.



Steve Johnson





From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of Jon
Miller
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 10:49 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?





On 5/30/2013 3:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:
If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."
SWAG; Given the era it's possible that with no overhead problems the
plane might have been transported a short distance (x miles). Not sure
that a truck, at that time and road conditions, could have done the job.
Looking up E.W. Wiggins in Wikipedia has some interesting
information. Could we assume the picture is 1929+?

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Jon Miller <atsf@...>
 

On 5/30/2013 3:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:
If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."
SWAG; Given the era it's possible that with no overhead problems the
plane might have been transported a short distance (x miles). Not sure
that a truck, at that time and road conditions, could have done the job.
Looking up E.W. Wiggins in Wikipedia has some interesting
information. Could we assume the picture is 1929+?

--
Jon Miller
For me time stopped in 1941
Digitrax--Chief/Zephyr systems, JMRI User
NMRA Life member #2623
Member SFRH&MS

Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

thmsdmpsy
 

It could be clean-up from a movie shot.  Tom Dempsey, Spokane, WA




________________________________
From: Steve and Barb Hile <shile@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 7:00 AM
Subject: RE: { SPAM 2 }:[STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?



 
And that the ramp down is from one boxcar while the platform is on another.

Interestingly, they are Bangor and Aroostook boxcars and the plane is
lettered for a commercial guy who flies in the Northeast, including places
in Maine.

The guys doing the unloading (note the way everyone is facing on the down
ramp shot) are pretty well dressed for laborers, but it must be cold.

Regards,

Steve Hile

_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 8:15 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: { SPAM 2 }:[STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the
roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the
ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.

Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

On May 30, 2013, at 5:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:

Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/

Ben Hom

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Soo Sawtooth box cars

Eric Hansmann
 

--- In STMFC@..., "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:
... Which I've added to my "Soo Sawtooth Primer folder at:

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFPH/files/Soo_%22Sawtooth%22_Primer/

The photo is named "1926 Geared Handbrake". You can also see this part in the Pullman builders photo named "1926".

Dennis
======================


Thank you for this timely reminder, Dennis. I'm on the last few steps in building one of your Soo box car resin kits. This kit has been a joy to build. I have built six F&C kits in the last month before starting the Soo box car and there has been less stress in the Soo box car build than in any one of the previous six builds. It's hard to believe this kit is about 20 years old.

Clark asked how long it would take to build 100 resin freight car kits and I'd estimate each can be built and ready to paint in 10-15 hours of work. I'm about to move again (but only ten miles), so the home layout is on hold. I've spent most of my time at the new house with contractors, so I've spent my time building several resin kits on a makeshift workbench at my new home. Different kits have slightly different build times, but the more you build the easier it is to get rolling and make progress. The toughest part is taking a seat and opening the box to get started.

I plan to share my resin kit building adventures on my blog in the next couple of weeks.

Eric


Eric Hansmann
El Paso, TX
http://designbuildop.hansmanns.org/

Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Steve and Barb Hile
 

And that the ramp down is from one boxcar while the platform is on another.



Interestingly, they are Bangor and Aroostook boxcars and the plane is
lettered for a commercial guy who flies in the Northeast, including places
in Maine.



The guys doing the unloading (note the way everyone is facing on the down
ramp shot) are pretty well dressed for laborers, but it must be cold.



Regards,

Steve Hile



_____

From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
Bruce F. Smith
Sent: Thursday, May 30, 2013 8:15 AM
To: <STMFC@...>
Subject: Re: { SPAM 2 }:[STMFC] Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?





I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the
roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the
ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.

Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

On May 30, 2013, at 5:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:

Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/

Ben Hom

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: { SPAM 2 }: Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Bruce Smith
 

I'll add that there seems to be a pretty significant wood platform on the roof of the car. It's hard to tell if the Cub is being brought up from the ground, or lowered to the ground in the photo with it on the ramp. Weird.


Regards

Bruce

Bruce Smith

Auburn, AL

On May 30, 2013, at 5:52 AM, benjaminfrank_hom wrote:



Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/


Ben Hom



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

Re: Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

Benjamin Hom
 

Nick Fry wrote:
"Take a gander here:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our
new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at
RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know."

No way the aircraft was shipped on top of this boxcar as it wouldn't
make clearances. However, aircraft factories before WWII weren't
necessarily set up for efficient manufacturing (Ford's Willow Run
B-24 plant was still years in the future), with assembly facilities
often set up on the second floor of buildings. (Brewster in Long
Island City was a notorious case as their inefficient arrangement
contributed to their difficulties meeting wartime production.) I
have a photo of the wing assembly of the Spirit of St. Louis being
lowered from the second floor of Ryan Aircraft in San Diego in using
a Santa Fe automobile car as an intermediate platform. (Charles
Lindbergh is seen in the photo helping to push the car out of the
way.)

This aircraft is a Piper Cub. Here's a photo of Piper's Lock Haven,
PA facility:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/Piper_1930s_Picture.jpg

I couldn't find anything on the layout of this factory, but the photos
could be documenting an event similar to that of the Ryan photo. I
did find a website of the Piper Aviation Museum in Lock Haven, who
might be able to shed more light on their manufacturing facility
setup.
http://www.pipermuseum.com/


Ben Hom

Shipping a plane on TOP of a boxcar?

NicholasF
 

Take a gander here: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/STMFC/photos/album/855954353/pic/list

We found these photos at the Barriger Library while cataloging our new B&A collection. No caption on the back.

I thought you all would find them interesting, if someone has this at RPM East next year I'm buying them a drink.

If anyone has any ideas about what's going on, please let me know.

Thanks
Take Care
-Nick Fry

Curator
John W. Barriger III National Railroad Library
http://www.umsl.edu/barriger

Re: Wabash Autobox - Yarmouth Model Works

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Thanks, Ryan.
I'm looking forward to it as well.
But I make no promises for a release date.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., "rreed_eagle" <twogreyhounds@...> wrote:

Pierre,
That new CP boxcar looks stunning and definitely good for at least a onesy in every freight car fleet but I have to tell you, I am REALLY looking forward to that Wabash autobox coming out!!

Just sayin' ;-)

Ryan Reed

Wabash Autobox - Yarmouth Model Works

Ryan Reed
 

Pierre,
That new CP boxcar looks stunning and definitely good for at least a onesy in every freight car fleet but I have to tell you, I am REALLY looking forward to that Wabash autobox coming out!!

Just sayin' ;-)

Ryan Reed

Re: more on Speedwitch's SP/T&NO A-50-4 auto car

Rhbale@...
 

Bill...
I am sending a page from my prototype parts scrap book that has images of
seven vertical hand brakes with bottom mechanisms directly to you. I hope
it offers some help.

Richard Bale
_

In a message dated 5/29/2013 3:08:00 A.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
fgexbill@... writes:




Thanks Dennis, glad I saw this before I began gluing things.

Bill Welch

--- In




_ (http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/) _STMFC@...
(mailto:STMFC@...) _, "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:



--- In _ (http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/)
_STMFC@... (mailto:STMFC@...) _, Bill Welch <fgexbill@> wrote:

If my thinking
about "mechanical advantage" is correct (it may have been high school
when I last thought about this--unfortunately), the large gear will
> go at the terminus or bottom of the brake shaft more or less at the
front of the gear box and the smaller gear will go towards the back
of the gear box (and closer to the brake cylinder) to mesh with the
larger gear.
You have it backwards, Bill. All geared handbrakes were "force
increasers" so the pinon (small gear) is on the driving shaft (the brake staff) and
the large gear is the driven gear. This reduces speed, relative to how fast
the brake wheel is turning, but increases torque.

I have a photo of one of these bottom of the staff gear boxes on a Soo
Line car built in 1926, but it doesn't look like a three sided box, so must
be something different.

Dennis
_ (http://www.model-railroad-hobbyist.com/)


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: Sunshine Order

Dennis Williams
 

Bruce.
I know that I am FAR from being a winner!  There are way more in other private collections. I did inform the family how, where and what to do with the collection. 
Thanks for the advice!.. 

Dennis Williams/Owner
http://www.resinbuilders4u.com/


________________________________
From: Bruce F. Smith <@smithbf>
To: "<STMFC@...>" <STMFC@...>
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 12:30 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine Order


 

Dennis, Folks

You win! Alas, this reminds me of the passing of a good friend and co-worker a few weeks ago. She was a quilter and had quite a fabric "stash" that my wife and some friends rescued from the ex-husband who wanted to put it in the dumpster. More than 20 Rubbermaid totes later, the ladies concluded that my friend had "won", at least by the definition, "she who dies with the most fabric, wins."

Relevance? Several things - first, make sure that your survivors understand the value of all these kits and models and do not "dumpsterize" them as has happened to several collections of rare models. Second, have a plan that your survivors can follow (and a will, something my friend did not do, even after a diagnosis of metastatic cancer). My wife has a trusted modeling friend's phone number, as his wife has mine. Third, keep records so that someone can decipher what ^%$#$ you did!

Regards

Bruce

Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On May 29, 2013, at 10:39 AM, Dennis Williams wrote:

I am close to 600 Resin cars here for my layout. Over 250 are built. I always add 8 or 9 each time I build for someone else. What will I do after they are all built? What else, work on brass!

Dennis Williams/Owner
http://www.resinbuilders4u.com/

________________________________
From: Bruce F. Smith <mailto:smithbf%40auburn.edu>
To: "<mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>" <mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 10:43 AM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: Sunshine Order

Clark,

You're serious? <VBG> I have well over 100 resin kits, and yes they are all for me and the layout I haven't even built yet. I call the upstairs area I keep them "the hobby shop". With a 500 car fleet necessary to even contemplate operations, several hundred of those being resin, I clearly have my work curt out for me. Of course, I have many duplicates of the same class, such as the PRR GR and GRA gondolas, of which I have 8 F&C and 11 Westies respectively. On the GS gon end I have 13 F&C, 1 Sunshine and 1 Bowser (must be rebuilt) and I need 10 more! Lets see, 8 X26, 9 X25... and then there are the foreign road cars <VBG>.

My wife does have explicit instructions about what to do with the built and unbuilt kits should I pass this mortal coil.

Regards

Bruce

Bruce F. Smith

Auburn, AL

https://www5.vetmed.auburn.edu/~smithbf/

"Some days you are the bug, some days you are the windshield."

__

/ &#92;

__<+--+>________________&#92;__/___ ________________________________

|- ______/ O O &#92;_______ -| | __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ |

| / 4999 PENNSYLVANIA 4999 &#92; | ||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||__||

|/_____________________________&#92;|_|________________________________|

| O--O &#92;0 0 0 0/ O--O | 0-0-0 0-0-0

On May 29, 2013, at 9:32 AM, <mailto:cepropst%40q.com<mailto:mailto:cepropst%40q.com>>
wrote:

Pierre, that's your business. What if the kits were all for you? Once you whip through that 100, what are you going to do with them? What next?
Clark Propst
As a disciplined prototype modeler/layout builder/operator I'm just trying to wrap my head around such large orders : )

--- In mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com<mailto:mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, "Pierre" <pierre.oliver@...> wrote:

Clark,
100 kits would take me about 4-5 months. I can do a car a day, but there are inevitable interruptions and distractions. And you have to make allowance for the "trouble" kits. Not all resin kits are created equal.
Pierre Oliver

--- In mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com<mailto:mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, cepropst@ wrote:

Ryan, You would actually build 100 resin kits? How long would that take?
Clark Propst

--- In mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com<mailto:mailto:STMFC%40yahoogroups.com>, "rreed_eagle" <twogreyhounds@> wrote:

If a new caster took over tomorrow and opened shop, I'd have no problem ordering 100+ kits right off the bat and I don't think I'm alone.

Ryan Reed

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

Re: ?: 1937 AAR 40' boxcars

Benjamin Hom
 

Tim O'Connor wrote:
"Now that we've identified the model as 1948+ postwar 10'6" -- there were quite
a few possible prototypes (if you ignore the particular door applied to the
model). RDG as Larry said, and also KCS, RI, SOU, WAB off the top of my head.
I'm sure there are others as well."

...except you'll also have to ignore the ends as well, as they are very poorly
rendered and really don't match the prototypes you cite.


Ben Hom

Re: ?: 1937 AAR 40' boxcars

Benjamin Hom
 

Up and down.

Ben Hom

________________________________
From: "@timboconnor" <@timboconnor>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Wed, May 29, 2013 4:19:05 PM
Subject: Re: [STMFC] Re: ?: 1937 AAR 40' boxcars

 
Ben

Do you mean narrower side-to-side or up-and-down? Both are possible.

Tim O'

----- Original Message -----
From: "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...>

Larry Kline wrote:
"The ends on the Precision Scale model are rather inaccurate models of
the Standard Railway Equipment R-3-4 end."

I referred to the ends on the model as r+3/4 ends (lower case) because
of the narrow top rib vice the wider ribs shown on the the other
cars. ("R" is used to denote the rectangular top rib.)

Ben Hom

Re: Sunshine Order

Pierre <pierre.oliver@...>
 

Clark,
Reread the my last.
Or better yet visit my blog, http://www.elgincarshops.com/mylayout.php
The layout is under construction. In fact all the handlaid track is in, it's all wired, scenery is under way, I'm very close to operating sessions.
Pierre Oliver

--- In STMFC@..., cepropst@... wrote:

Pierre, you are one of a kind!

I hesitate to offer advice to anyone on this esteemed panel, but you need to build your models now because you won't have time when the layout's under construction. If you read this as: "IF the layouts under construction." Not to worry, you're never going to build one.

I'm putting together a clinic I hope to give at Naperville on this very subject. Kind of light hearted, but with a kick : ))

Clark Propst
Right now I have 164 freights in service 59 are resin. Several more had resin castings added. I'm surprised that I have 10 RTR models, most are Erlt and have been extensively modified.