Date   

Re: Sunshine Response to Request for Replacement of Wrong Parts in Th...

 

Patricia contacted me about finding a contractor to make the castings or a buyer for the line.  I wasn’t able to help.  It took 4 years to find a buyer for Westerfield.  However, the new owner has found that new runs of cars unavailable for several years is profitable.  As long as the Sunshine kits are up to today’s standards, I see no reason that long off the market kits shouldn’t sell well.  Remember, folks didn’t get a chance to stock up before Martin’s death like they did when we retired. – Al Westerfield
 

Sent: Sunday, May 25, 2014 11:50 AM
Subject: [STMFC] Sunshine Response to Request for Replacement of Wrong Parts in Th...
 
 

I know it is impossible to confirm but is it likely that any of the kits will be re-run? Perhaps by a secondary with a licence agreement perhaps. Is it up for sale? Any hope?
 
 
Greg Martin 
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 


Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

Tony Thompson
 

Richard Eaton wrote:

Try making a pdf of the files and see what size you get.  You can group them into batches with the images in the pdf and each image can still be 'zoomed' to see the details


    Good suggestion. You can choose the resolution of the images when the PDF is created, so you may not wish to include them at the full 600 dpi.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: open car loads

Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Jack & Group,

Right!  Poor choice of words. I should have said storm drain piping. 

I am still looking for a method to model cast iron pipe with the belled end. I have some ideas about how to make this type of pipe, but wonder if others have already modeled such.

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On May 25, 2014, at 8:36 AM, 'Jack Burgess' jack@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:


Bill...

 

Sewer pipes were typically cast iron or terra cotta pipes which could handle the types of liquids dumped into them. Storm drain systems typically used concrete pipes (or corrugated metal). Concrete pipes weren't used for sewer (or water) systems since they leaked at the joints (not a problem with storm drain water) and couldn't accommodate the sewage.

 

Jack Burgess

 

 

 

Tony,

 

Thanks for the link to the DUHA loads. I had forgotten about them. Old dog memory in action.

 

I think I will have a need for a few of the concrete pipes also as the city of Burlington, Kansas, will be installing new sewer piping in 1953. This will bring in a number of loads for the daily mixed train to deliver. 

 

Cheers and Happy Modeling,

Bill Keene

Irvine, CA




Re: Sunshine Response to Request for Replacement of Wrong Parts in Th...

Pierre Oliver
 

As a kit manufacturer I am reluctant to revisit any of the cars that were offered by Sunshine at this point.
The volume of sales would be so hard to predict, which ones would you choose?
Pierre Oliver
www.elgincarshops.com
www.yarmouthmodelworks.com
On 25/05/2014 12:50 PM, tgregmrtn@... [STMFC] wrote:

 

I know it is impossible to confirm but is it likely that any of the kits will be re-run? Perhaps by a secondary with a licence agreement perhaps. Is it up for sale? Any hope?
 
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 


Sunshine Response to Request for Replacement of Wrong Parts in Th...

Greg Martin
 

I know it is impossible to confirm but is it likely that any of the kits will be re-run? Perhaps by a secondary with a licence agreement perhaps. Is it up for sale? Any hope?
 
 
Greg Martin  
 
Eventually all things merge into one and a river runs through it.
Norman Maclean
 


Couplers part of frt cars

Mikebrock
 

Couplers are, indeed, considered by the STMFC to be part of a freight car.

However, it's the Bahamas, not Bermuda.

Mike Brock
STMFC Owner and Head Judge


Re: open car loads

Jack Burgess
 

Bill...

 

Sewer pipes were typically cast iron or terra cotta pipes which could handle the types of liquids dumped into them. Storm drain systems typically used concrete pipes (or corrugated metal). Concrete pipes weren't used for sewer (or water) systems since they leaked at the joints (not a problem with storm drain water) and couldn't accommodate the sewage.

 

Jack Burgess

 

 

 

Tony,

 

Thanks for the link to the DUHA loads. I had forgotten about them. Old dog memory in action.

 

I think I will have a need for a few of the concrete pipes also as the city of Burlington, Kansas, will be installing new sewer piping in 1953. This will bring in a number of loads for the daily mixed train to deliver. 

 

Cheers and Happy Modeling,

Bill Keene

Irvine, CA


Re: Off topic coupler post

Clark Cooper
 

Matt,

I wouldn't think an apology is necessary. Couplers are part of a steam era freight car.

Your youtube videos do an excellent job of showing Sergent couplers in action, and during assembly. I will say that the assembly jig they sell is worth getting, should a person decide to assemble their own.

Tim Warris posted a video a few years back showing the use of Sergent couplers on his Bronx Terminal layout. The sharp curves render Kadees almost useless, but the Sergents work just fine under those conditions.

All that said, Sergents are not for everyone. Those who are interested should buy a couple (ha!) and try them out.

-Clark Cooper
(the other Iowa Clark)

On May 24, 2014, at 11:41 PM, Matt Goodman goodman312@yahoo.co.uk [STMFC] wrote:


I was so pleased to be able to contribute to this list that I didn't recognize that my last note was a bit off topic for this list.

I have apparently funded another day in Bermuda for Mike...

Sorry guys.

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio


Re: open car loads

genegreen1942@...
 

I second Clark's comment.  Sheffield Brick & Tile (Iowa on the M&StL) shipped miles of clay tile in box cars.  Floor was padded with straw and tile loaded by hand in the 1950s.  
Gene Green


Re: open car loads

Clark Propst
 

We had a large brick and tile operation here for years. They shipped all their clay products in box cars.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

Richard Eaton
 

Try making a pdf of the files and see what size you get.  You can group them into batches with the images in the pdf and each image can still be 'zoomed' to see the details.

Richard Eaton
RGM&HS


Re: open car loads

Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Tony,

Thanks for the link to the DUHA loads. I had forgotten about them. Old dog memory in action.

I think I will have a need for a few of the concrete pipes also as the city of Burlington, Kansas, will be installing new sewer piping in 1953. This will bring in a number of loads for the daily mixed train to deliver. 

Cheers and Happy Modeling,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA

On May 24, 2014, at 10:06 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Bill Keene wrote:

Thanks for sharing how to make pipe loads. I will be doing a few of these for my presently empty gondolas. 

But I have a question… What would you recommend to represent a cast iron pipe with the belled end? These would be about 10-feet in length. 

      I know the kind of pipe you mean, and don't know a good easy way to model it. But the corresponding bell-end concrete pipe is made as a car load by DUHA, and sold in this country by JWD; you can see it at this link:


My experience with DUHA loads is excellent, and JWD offer good service.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history







Re: open car loads

A&Y Dave in MD
 

Would terra cotta water and sewage pipe be shipped in gondolas in the 30's-40's? I know that a terra cotta pipe kiln/factory existed on the line I model, and I know Seley composite hoppers brought in the clay from a pit further south on the line.  I have a bunch of F&C Southern Seley hopper kits for incoming, but don't know what cars hauled the finished product at this time.

I was hoping it might be boxcars due to the more fragile nature of terra cotta and a requisite need for packing materials. Boxcar loads are far easier to model!  Maybe they are stronger than that and could go in gons. Any thoughts or pics on carloads of terra cotta pipe in the 30's-40's?

Dave


On May 25, 2014, at 1:06 AM, "Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

 

Bill Keene wrote:

Thanks for sharing how to make pipe loads. I will be doing a few of these for my presently empty gondolas. 

But I have a question… What would you recommend to represent a cast iron pipe with the belled end? These would be about 10-feet in length. 

      I know the kind of pipe you mean, and don't know a good easy way to model it. But the corresponding bell-end concrete pipe is made as a car load by DUHA, and sold in this country by JWD; you can see it at this link:


My experience with DUHA loads is excellent, and JWD offer good service.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: open car loads

Tony Thompson
 

Bill Keene wrote:

Thanks for sharing how to make pipe loads. I will be doing a few of these for my presently empty gondolas. 

But I have a question… What would you recommend to represent a cast iron pipe with the belled end? These would be about 10-feet in length. 

      I know the kind of pipe you mean, and don't know a good easy way to model it. But the corresponding bell-end concrete pipe is made as a car load by DUHA, and sold in this country by JWD; you can see it at this link:


My experience with DUHA loads is excellent, and JWD offer good service.

Tony Thompson             Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705         www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history





Re: Are conductor's lists of interest?

A&Y Dave in MD
 

I scanned all 88 pages of first book, May 15-June 9, 1934 at 600dpi. The TIF files, one per page, are 96MB each. I got a png format version down to 10mb. I'll have to batch resize and convert to compressed format to be able to share, probably via jpg. You can see the pencil dents in the paper at the high res :-)

Let me know off list at dbott at vt.edu. if you wish to help transcribe a train's worth (1-2 pages).

I have some practice reading Mr. Snow's handwriting and abbreviations, so I can share some suggestions. I also have a Winston-Salem division seniority list from about that time that I can share so you get crew names right. I also have W-S division ETT's scanned to help with milepost and train number references.

We could tell quite the story when we're done!

Dave Bott


Off topic coupler post

Matt Goodman
 

I was so pleased to be able to contribute to this list that I didn't recognize that my last note was a bit off topic for this list. 

I have apparently funded another day in Bermuda for Mike...

Sorry guys. 

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On May 25, 2014, at 12:36 AM, "Matt Goodman goodman312@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

If you buy the bulk kits, they are price competitive with Kadees (the last time I priced them, they were actually less expensive). 

They operate fantastically, but as both Clarks mentioned, can be fiddly in coupling. This is not a mechanical issue; if the couplers are aligned and at least one is open, they couple easier than Kadees - no excess speed is required to force the coupler jaws open like is sometime necessary with Kadees. You can push cars together at a snails pace and they will couple just fine - if you have good throttle control, the car being coupled too won't even move. It's fascinating to watch.  That alignment is the key; Kadees self center, so don't require any pre-coupling fiddling. 

As both Clarks have also said, uncoupling is far easier than Kadees, with some caveats (can't use under track magnets, the magnetic uncoupling "wand" can attract (or stick to) steel weighted cars).  

If they aren't scale, they are very, very close. The only part I know is  not to scale is the thickness of the coupler shank - these are thicker than Kadee shanks by about .012", but thinner than the prototype to allow them to be mounted in most HO coupler boxes. 

Assembly is more involved than Kadee, but not difficult. Frank has done a fantastic job making these die cast parts fit very well from piece to piece - tolerances are very consistent.  Check out Sergent Engineerings web site for assembly instructions. This will give you some for context and the pre assembly work and post assembly break in are discussed. 

I made some YouTube videos on these fantastic devices a couple years ago showing how they work, slack comparison to Kadee and parts and assembly. Google "sergent couplers, mgoodman312" to bring up a few (or go to YouTube and search mgoodman312 to find my channel, which has about five Sergent videos in a playlist). I still watch them occasionally for fun - easier to see than watching them in person!

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On May 21, 2014, at 3:38 PM, "riverman_vt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hi fellows,

     I'm glad to see these Sargent couplers come up since there was little response to a question raised about them some months ago. How expensive are they and how well do they operate? Clark, you mentioned work that sounded like pre-installation work. Could you please expand upon that a bit. Lastly are they really scale and do they offer any real advantage over the Kadee #58's?

Thanks very much for any information you'd care to share.  Don Valentine

Yahoo! Groups
PrivacyUnsubscribeTer


Re: Wheelset and coupler choices.

Matt Goodman
 

If you buy the bulk kits, they are price competitive with Kadees (the last time I priced them, they were actually less expensive). 

They operate fantastically, but as both Clarks mentioned, can be fiddly in coupling. This is not a mechanical issue; if the couplers are aligned and at least one is open, they couple easier than Kadees - no excess speed is required to force the coupler jaws open like is sometime necessary with Kadees. You can push cars together at a snails pace and they will couple just fine - if you have good throttle control, the car being coupled too won't even move. It's fascinating to watch.  That alignment is the key; Kadees self center, so don't require any pre-coupling fiddling. 

As both Clarks have also said, uncoupling is far easier than Kadees, with some caveats (can't use under track magnets, the magnetic uncoupling "wand" can attract (or stick to) steel weighted cars).  

If they aren't scale, they are very, very close. The only part I know is  not to scale is the thickness of the coupler shank - these are thicker than Kadee shanks by about .012", but thinner than the prototype to allow them to be mounted in most HO coupler boxes. 

Assembly is more involved than Kadee, but not difficult. Frank has done a fantastic job making these die cast parts fit very well from piece to piece - tolerances are very consistent.  Check out Sergent Engineerings web site for assembly instructions. This will give you some for context and the pre assembly work and post assembly break in are discussed. 

I made some YouTube videos on these fantastic devices a couple years ago showing how they work, slack comparison to Kadee and parts and assembly. Google "sergent couplers, mgoodman312" to bring up a few (or go to YouTube and search mgoodman312 to find my channel, which has about five Sergent videos in a playlist). I still watch them occasionally for fun - easier to see than watching them in person!

Matt Goodman
Columbus, Ohio

Sent from my mobile

On May 21, 2014, at 3:38 PM, "riverman_vt@... [STMFC]" <STMFC@...> wrote:

Hi fellows,

     I'm glad to see these Sargent couplers come up since there was little response to a question raised about them some months ago. How expensive are they and how well do they operate? Clark, you mentioned work that sounded like pre-installation work. Could you please expand upon that a bit. Lastly are they really scale and do they offer any real advantage over the Kadee #58's?

Thanks very much for any information you'd care to share.  Don Valentine

Yahoo! Groups
PrivacyUnsubscribeTer


Re: open car loads

Bill Keene <wakeene@...>
 

Hi Tony,

Thanks for sharing how to make pipe loads. I will be doing a few of these for my presently empty gondolas. 

But I have a question… What would you recommend to represent a cast iron pipe with the belled end? These would be about 10-feet in length. 

Cheers,
Bill Keene
Irvine, CA


On May 24, 2014, at 5:39 PM, Tony Thompson tony@... [STMFC] <STMFC@...> wrote:

I've posted another description of how I make open-car loads, this one a gondola pipe load. If you're interested, it's at this link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2014/05/open-car-loads-more-pipe-loads.html

and the post also contains a link to a prior post on the same topic; or you can use the search box at upper right of the blog page to locate other posts on this topic.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@...
Publishers of books on railroad history



open car loads

Tony Thompson
 

I've posted another description of how I make open-car loads, this one a gondola pipe load. If you're interested, it's at this link:

http://modelingthesp.blogspot.com/2014/05/open-car-loads-more-pipe-loads.html

and the post also contains a link to a prior post on the same topic; or you can use the search box at upper right of the blog page to locate other posts on this topic.

Tony Thompson Editor, Signature Press, Berkeley, CA
2906 Forest Ave., Berkeley, CA 94705 www.signaturepress.com
(510) 540-6538; fax, (510) 540-1937; e-mail, tony@signaturepress.com
Publishers of books on railroad history


Re: typical ART wood reefers

proto48er
 

Ed - About 15 years ago, I measured the only ART wood reefer I could find - the one at the National Museum of Transport in St Louis - and drew up "O" scale drawings for a Chooch resin model.  The kit was Ultrascale II kit #656. I looked all over south Texas (Rio Grande Valley) and all over the San Luis Valley in Colorado for another ART wood reefer, but only found steel cars out on farms, etc.

The drawings are not complete - I did not draw up the end of the car because I had a good full-on end photo of the prototype.  I did draw the side view, underframe views, and roof view.  PM me a snail-mail address, and I will send copies.

I need to find the ink drawings and send them to the authors of the ART book.  I recall that the plans in the Car Builder's Cyclopedia were by ACF and were for a car that was never built.

There were, as I recall, two major groupings of wood ART cars still in operation in the 1940's.  The one at St Louis was the later-built version.  An earlier version was very similar, but slightly smaller.

Does anyone out there in STMFC land know where another wood ART reefer might be hiding?

A.T. Kott

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