Date   

Re: Steam/Transition Era Cement plants: image help?

JoelDee
 

--- In STMFC@..., "cereshill" <cereshill@...> wrote:

Fellas,
I am hoping to model a cement plant c.1950 for my railroad (PRR and NYC rolling stock). I am having trouble finding prototype images and or drawings to use. In seattle we have a modern plant or two---but I do not think they are representative.

Thank you for any help,
Brad Andonian
BRAD, Google Trona, California and search the historical photos which would represent a minerals mining operation during the steam era from the 1800s on into the 50s. UP, I believe had a 50s cement plant in Wyoming and the UP historians should be of help. Portland Cement had a plant in Ontario or Corona, CA--Once a mountain of cement somewhere in San Bernadino that was used to build the city of Los Angeles.


Re: Lackawanna USRA steel box car question

Donald Ford <ford.donald77@...>
 

Aaron
the 47000 series had 4/4 dreadnaugh end with the corrugations beveled off the the end of the ribs and Hutchins dry lading roof they came with Youngstown dors but some got 5 or 6 panel Surerior doors  I have a poto of one of those cars but the lettering is all most gone con't read the number
the 47700 series had the same type of ends and Murphy rectangular panel roofs they alos got soem Surperior doors the Seatm era site has a picture of 47936 with a 6 panelk Superior door hope this helps
Don Ford
69 and sunny in Kanab UT


Re: Steam/Transition Era Cement plants: image help?

Clark Propst
 

Brad if you contact me off list I can send you photos of the two plants in Mason City Iowa from that time.
Clark Propst

--- In STMFC@..., "cereshill" <cereshill@...> wrote:

Fellas,
I am hoping to model a cement plant c.1950 for my railroad (PRR and NYC rolling stock). I am having trouble finding prototype images and or drawings to use. In seattle we have a modern plant or two---but I do not think they are representative.

Thank you for any help,
Brad Andonian


Re: Steam/Transition Era Cement plants: image help?

John King
 

Brad,

Search on "Lehigh and New England Railroad". You should find a site, "Lehigh and New England Railroad-Black Diamonds to Tidewater". It has an interactive map and when you click on the towns just north of Allentown you will find lots of photos of the cement plants in that area.

Also, if you can find the color book on the L&NE that was written by Doug Lilly, it has a number of color images of cement plants taken in the 1950's. Many of them contain STMFC's (stay out of jail content).

John King

--- In STMFC@..., "cereshill" <cereshill@...> wrote:

Fellas,
I am hoping to model a cement plant c.1950 for my railroad (PRR and NYC rolling stock). I am having trouble finding prototype images and or drawings to use. In seattle we have a modern plant or two---but I do not think they are representative.

Thank you for any help,
Brad Andonian


Lackawanna USRA steel box car question

npin53
 

I'm interested in modeling one of the DL&W box cars in the 47000-47699, and 47700-47999 series. What ends and roof did these cars have?

There is a picture of one of the cars in Ted Cullota's box and auto car reference manual, page 128.

Are decals available for the "Route of Phoebe Snow" logo?

Thank you for any assistance.

Aaron Gjermundson
Still Winter in North Dakota.


Re: Weaver Models 40' SS boxcar - prototype match

Larry Kline
 

I have all three of the Weaver / Crown cars. They all are the same height and all three have the same 4-4 Dreadnaught end and the same simplified underframe. The 32 ARA boxcar and the reefer have rectangular panel roofs. The SS boxcar has a 13 carline flat panel roof. Crown models was located in Newtown MA and I bought my first Crown Models cars in a Boston area hobby shop.

The 32 ARA box car is dimensionally correct. I have several painted for the WM. I have 2 reefers painted for the MDT 8000-8145 series. The reefer has a rectangular panel roof rather than the correct DSI roof. I have three SS boxcar models one I painted for as ATSF 128784, and Weaver factory paint jobs for MILW and MWR. The SS boxcars are all stand in models. I agree with Ben Hom that the SS boxcar does not have a prototype.

Bob Jones wrote:
Hi , The model in question was done by Crown Models originally , as was the woodside reefer and the 1932 style boxcar . The line was bought by Weaver soon after they moved into injection molding business , as I remember . The reefer and the 1932 share a 4 over 4 dreadnaught end , which may be the case with the outside braced (box car)

Ben Hom wrote;
Unfortunately, there aren't that many "Pratt truss" 8 ft 7 in IH prototypes (B&M/MTC, L&N, SAL), and none with Dreadnaught ends or 13- carline roofs. You can use this model as a stand-in for the B&M/MTC, L&N and SAL cars, but be advised that roof and ends do not match these
prototypes.

Larry Kline


Re: Steam/Transition Era Cement plants: image help?

James Babcock
 

Try google - photos of Portland Cement or photos of Portland Cement in Jamesville, NY
Jim


________________________________
From: cereshill <cereshill@...>
To: STMFC@...
Sent: Saturday, April 20, 2013 12:15 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Steam/Transition Era Cement plants: image help?

 

Fellas,
I am hoping to model a cement plant c.1950 for my railroad (PRR and NYC rolling stock). I am having trouble finding prototype images and or drawings to use. In seattle we have a modern plant or two---but I do not think they are representative.

Thank you for any help,
Brad Andonian




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: SAL Class B-3/B-4/B-5 SS XM (was Re: Weaver Models 40' SS boxcar)

thomas christensen
 

Drawings for the B-5 are in the files section.
Tom Christensen



------------------------------
On Fri, Apr 19, 2013 5:20 AM EDT Monk Alan wrote:

Hi guys,

I've been working on a similar conversion, but using F&C's BAR 1927 ARA SS (Pratt truss) boxcar with flat steel and Youngstown doors (http://www.fandckits.com/HOFreight/6553.html) instead, as the diagonal strapping on the side's end panels is a closer match to what I've observed in pics of SAL B4s and B5s (ie a single strap running diagonally top to bottom, slanted inwards to the top). The sides and ends are basically good, replace side ladders with wire grabs and add shallow fish-belly centre beams to the underframe.

Must admit I hadn't considered the roof, but as the model is only part-started, it's not too late to rummage through my spares box and see what I have. Decals were going to come from a hodge-podge of SAL decals in my decal box, though IIRC there's suitable ones on the Speedwitch SAL boxcars sheet??

Regards,
Alan Monk,
London, UK



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Michigan Central hart ballast cars 50T

Brad Andonian
 

Fellas,
me again... Anyone have an image of some of these cars?

Thank you,
BRad Andonian


Steam/Transition Era Cement plants: image help?

Brad Andonian
 

Fellas,
I am hoping to model a cement plant c.1950 for my railroad (PRR and NYC rolling stock). I am having trouble finding prototype images and or drawings to use. In seattle we have a modern plant or two---but I do not think they are representative.

Thank you for any help,
Brad Andonian


Re: How to get that greasy look

Craig Zeni
 

On Apr 20, 2013, at 7:54 AM, STMFC@... wrote:
3e. Re: How to get that greasy look
Posted by: "qmp211" milepost206@... qmp211
Date: Fri Apr 19, 2013 1:47 pm ((PDT))




I found this company while digging around for some 1/35th scale armor paint. They are based in Spain with a U.S. office.

Here is a link to their weathering paints including engine grime, oil and fuel stains. There is a lot of material on their website and worthy of your time if interested.

http://www.ak-interactive-usa.com/weathering.html

I became intrigued due to their quest for perfection in reproduction and bought both of their books - FAQ and FAQ 2 to get a handle on the results. The book cost is justified. Outstanding presentation and content. The FAQ 3 book is due in the U.S. in a few weeks and I would recommend your serious consideration. Don't be bothered by the fact that the subject matter is mostly armor. It doesn't matter. This stuff is great!

They're on youtube.

The company is interested in developing rail based tutorials and you can offer suggestions directly. However, they are attending the AMPS Show in Atlanta this weekend so I wouldn't expect a response until next week after the show dust settles.

I don't work for AK or represent them. I'm just an impressed user of their products.

Randy Danniel
www.TheBurlingtonWaycars.com
Brain Banna has been using their products for a while - they produce remarkable results. I haven't tried them yet though...



Craig Zeni
Cary NC


Re: How to get that greasy look

qmp211
 

I found this company while digging around for some 1/35th scale armor paint. They are based in Spain with a U.S. office.

Here is a link to their weathering paints including engine grime, oil and fuel stains. There is a lot of material on their website and worthy of your time if interested.

http://www.ak-interactive-usa.com/weathering.html

I became intrigued due to their quest for perfection in reproduction and bought both of their books - FAQ and FAQ 2 to get a handle on the results. The book cost is justified. Outstanding presentation and content. The FAQ 3 book is due in the U.S. in a few weeks and I would recommend your serious consideration. Don't be bothered by the fact that the subject matter is mostly armor. It doesn't matter. This stuff is great!

They're on youtube.

The company is interested in developing rail based tutorials and you can offer suggestions directly. However, they are attending the AMPS Show in Atlanta this weekend so I wouldn't expect a response until next week after the show dust settles.

I don't work for AK or represent them. I'm just an impressed user of their products.

Randy Danniel
www.TheBurlingtonWaycars.com


Re: How to get that greasy look

william darnaby
 

I have done that with carbody filters on diesels (that pull steam era
freight cars) to good effect putting a tiny bit of LaBelle oil on the filter
and then a bit of weathering powder. So it might work on tank cars.

Bill Darnaby

-----Original Message-----
From: STMFC@... [mailto:STMFC@...] On Behalf Of
asychis@...
Sent: Friday, April 19, 2013 8:49 AM
To: STMFC@...
Subject: [STMFC] Re: How to get that greasy look

This might be way out in left field, but what about a very small drop
of...oil? Like a LaBelle light oil. It would surely spread out well and
if it collects dust, so much the better.

Jerry Michels





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links


Re: How to get that greasy look

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@..., Benjamin Hom <b.hom@...> wrote:
...It would surely spread out well and if it
collects dust, so much the better."

...except 1:1 dust doesn't scale down very well.  Take a look at your layout if
you haven't dusted for a while and you'll see what I mean.


Ben Hom
What, you don't like scale tumbleweeds?

Dennis


Re: How to get that greasy look

Benjamin Hom
 

Jerry Michels wrote:
"This might be way out in left field, but what about a very small drop
of...oil? Like a LaBelle light oil. It would surely spread out well and if it
collects dust, so much the better."

...except 1:1 dust doesn't scale down very well.  Take a look at your layout if
you haven't dusted for a while and you'll see what I mean.


Ben Hom


Fw: Bygone Era - Life in the 1890s to the early 20th Century

mrprksr <mrprksr@...>
 

Some railroad stuff mixed in here...all very clear...Good picture of FGEX reefer
on slide #33....Hope Boss man will atleast post #33....Thanks....Larry Mennie



----- Forwarded Message ----
From: "Dickchristie@..." <Dickchristie@...>
To: Dickchristie@...
Sent: Fri, April 19, 2013 7:33:13 AM
Subject: Bygone Era - Life in the 1890s to the early 20th Century




________________________________
Bygone Era - Life in the 1890s to the early 20th Century

Windows to history. One really needs to take the time to study these in
detail. Can learn much about how people lived. I noticed too, how clear
these pics are and that some of these folks are actually smiling! So often,
in old pics, they weren't.
These are fantastic photos of life in the late 1890's, to the early 20th
century. I had to view them twice, as they are compelling.
http://www.railfan.net/sysop/temp/shorpyphotos.html


Re: How to get that greasy look

asychis@...
 

This might be way out in left field, but what about a very small drop
of...oil? Like a LaBelle light oil. It would surely spread out well and if it
collects dust, so much the better.

Jerry Michels


SAL Class B-3/B-4/B-5 SS XM (was Re: Weaver Models 40' SS boxcar)

golden1014
 

Hi Ben,

SAL had three classes of Pratt truss cars--B-3, B-4 and B-5. B-3 and B-4 were 40 ton cars and B-5 were 50-ton cars. Also 280 similar cars from the GF&A merger. There has been extensive discussion of these cars in the archives so do a little searching and you should find plenty of info.

In short, yes, SAL rebuilt most of the B-5 cars from 1951-1955 with steel sides, but a few of each car class remained in revenue service into the late 50s and perhaps early 60s. I can send you pictures offline of each class and the rebuilt cars if you're interested, plus a little more detail on when the cars were last reported in revenue service.

The Weaver model in question has a similar appearance to the B-class cars, but the ends are incorrect. SAL B-3,4 or 5 cars did not have 4-4 dreadnuaght ends.

John Golden
O'Fallon, IL

--- In STMFC@..., "Benjamin Scanlon" <benjaminscanlon@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@> wrote:

Clark Propst wrote:
"Off the top of my head a 'look alike' might be possible using a F&C
B&M kit? Maybe adding a X29 roof? Micro Scale makes/made SAL decals."

Funaro does a version with the "X29 roof":
http://www.fandckits.com/HOFreight/6000.html

I'd still do a side-by-side of the Funaro kit with the SAL cars to
verify the changes that need to be made, but this opens up another
option to model these cars in HO.


Ben Hom
hello all

can i ask how late these cars ran on SAL in the form depicted in sunshine's kit? i may be wrong but i seem to recall information that they were rebuilt at some point, with steel sides?

i am not sure if they retained the trusses in the rebuild or whether they ended up looking like a lower height B-5.

regards,

benjamin


Re: Weaver Models 40' SS boxcar - prototype match

Thomas Baker
 

________________________________________
I wonder whether the refrigerator car and maybe even the 1932 box car do not go back to KUSAN-AUBURN trains. KUSAN had a steel box car and a wood-sided refrigerator car that looked quite similar to the WEAVER product. Well, perhaps Bachmann has what started out with KUSAN.

Tom Baker


Re: Weaver Models 40' SS boxcar - prototype match

Bob Jones <bobjonesmodels@...>
 

Hi , The model in question was done by Crown Models originally , as was the woodside reefer and the 1932 style boxcar . The line was bought by Weaver soon after they moved into injection molding business , as I remember . The reefer and the 1932 share a 4 over 4 dreadnaught end , which may be the case with the outside braced . I don't have a sample of it to compare , sold it when the 2008 Convention resin car was done . Bob Jones , Ct.

----- Original Message -----
From: moonmuln
To: STMFC@...
Sent: 4/18/2013 8:43:10 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Re: Weaver Models 40' SS boxcar - prototype match





--- In STMFC@..., "benjaminfrank_hom" <b.hom@...> wrote:



Dennis Storzek wrote:
"I think everyone is just assuming that since the sides look like the
hat-section Pratt truss framing of the 1923 ARA car, that that's what
was copied. But with Weaver these days, who knows... the sides may have
been stretched to fit existing ends."

I'll buy reusing existing ends from another model:
http://www.weavermodels.com/page38.html

However, this car still has the proportions of a lower IH boxcar (8 ft
7 in), and does not have the proportions of one of the taller "Pratt
Truss" prototypes (ex: SP Class B-50-15/16).
http://www.steamerafreightcars.com/gallery/boxauto/sp37582main.html

I'm still standing by my assetion that this model has no prototype.


Ben Hom
I think this single-sheathed car, the steel-sided car Ben mentioned, and a wood-sided reefer http://www.weavermodels.com/page36.html
all originated with Crown Metal Products a few decades ago (maybe the '80s?), and came to Weaver later. They seem to share the same dimensions and ends, with different roofs and sides. I think looking for the prototype is a wild goose chase.

IIRC,the reefer resembles the MDT composite reefers built c'40. The steel box is sorta like a 1932 AAR, but shorter, I think. I've thought of these cars as being around 9' IH, but I sure could be wrong about a few inches. I don't recall whether I ever measured one.
To me, the sides of the single-sheathed car would have been worthy of a kitbash if it weren't for the overly prominent joints between boards. Another missed opportunity for the scale community. (descends from soapbox)

Jack Mullen




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]