Date   

Re: Train Miniature

Richard Hendrickson
 

On May 5, 2013, at 5:14 PM, pullmanboss <pullmanboss@yahoo.com> wrote:

Frank Pearsall wrote:

Was originally started by the guy who ran Balboa Scale Models (brass importers) (Ted "Something") in the early 1970s.
Ted Hollow

Tom Madden
Tom is right, and the toolmaker was the late Al Armitage. Which explains why a lot of the paint/lettering was pretty good, as Al Westerfield observed, even though the models were mostly bogus. The first TM cars were the wood reefers, which were crude and clumsy (but not essentially inaccurate) representations of PFE wood reefers. After that, it went downhill. To keep tooling costs down, the reefer underframes and other parts were also used for other kits (including the awful "X29" steel box cars). I was around Balboa/TM a lot at that time because I was living in San Diego and sometimes doing prototype research for Ted, and I once got up the nerve to ask Al, in a joking way (though I wasn't really joking), how he could look at himself in the mirror while tooling those phony freight car models, and his answer was that he did what Ted wanted him to do as long as his paychecks cleared the bank. When sales didn't live up to expectations and the paychecks dried up, Al moved on to other (and, one hopes, better) things.

Richard Hendrickson


Stock Car Shipments in 1953

Charles Hostetler <cesicjh@...>
 

Group,

I was interested in the earlier discussion about post-war stock car shipments and thought I would chip in some data from the 1% Carload Waybill Survey. Those interested can find the information at:

http://cnwmodeling.blogspot.com/2013/05/stock-car-shipments.html

I think there might be some interesting subtlety in the way we can portray stock car traffic that I didn't see before.

Thanks and Regards,

Charles Hostetler


Re: UP's Daylight Livestock Train...was Re: Post War Stock Cars

Mikebrock
 

Dave Evans writes:

"What is curious is that the wheel bearing covers look like the older plain bearing caps - and they look to be painted a very light color - maybe even white - perhaps to indicate they should not be serviced like a plain bearing."

It is noteworthy and perhaps fortunate that the UP stock cars with roller bearings used the same bearing caps as non roller bearing equipped trucks. The article by Metcalfe notes that there were no outside visible changes to conventional plain bearing trucks, with Timken providing the roller bearings and the RR fitting them into the existing trucks. It also notes that the journal box lid was painted yellow to signify roller bearings. There is a photo [ B/W ] which clearly shows the much lighter color on the lids. I'll do some additional checks with color photos to see if there is some indication as to how long the lids were painted yellow.

Mike Brock


UP's Daylight Livestock Train...was Re: Post War Stock Cars

devansprr
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "soolinehistory" <destorzek@...> wrote:



--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Evans" <devans1@> wrote:

I wonder how long these cars retained the white bearing covers. For modeling, seems to me like a regular plain bearing truck could be used under these cars - just need to paint the bearing caps.

Dave Evans
The journal lids were painted silver (aluminum) to indicate the special bearings.

Dennis
Dennis,

Many thanks - and that makes sense - they are the only "white" on an otherwise slightly washed out grey image. Couldn't figure out why they were so bright - even though they may have been in the sun.

Dave Evans


UP's Daylight Livestock Train...was Re: Post War Stock Cars

Dennis Storzek
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Evans" <devans1@...> wrote:

I wonder how long these cars retained the white bearing covers. For modeling, seems to me like a regular plain bearing truck could be used under these cars - just need to paint the bearing caps.

Dave Evans
The journal lids were painted silver (aluminum) to indicate the special bearings.

Dennis


Re: Post War Stock Cars

devansprr
 

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, Guy Wilber <guycwilber@...> wrote:

The numbers are based on receipt of livestock to major markets (for slaughter) numbering from 64 in 1935 to 68 in 1950 from the US Department of Agriculture. The numbers might very well rise in favor of the railroads if long hauls such as you suggest existed in high enough numbers (which I rather doubt). The railroads did not report tonnage of livestock hauled to the ICC until 1940 after which you can study tons originated and terminated (by territory).

"And are those 'numbers of animals hauled' or 'numbers of animal haul miles' percentages?"

Strictly those hauled to their death sentences.

"And did those numbers count the animals hauled by truck to the local rail head at all?"

Absolutely not.

"I'm not 'doubting your numbers' ... not at all - I just want to understand them fully."

Here are ARA (1928) and AAR statistics for carloads of livestock originated for a few select years: 1,375,485 in 1928, 740,685 in 1936, 640,968 in 1940 and 541,606 for 1949. These would seem to parallel the percentages lost to trucking. WWII traffic did escalate on the railroads notably in 1943 when the drought forced Western ranchers to sell off herds. Even the war years were dominated by trucking. The post war years were a continuation of the downward spiral.


Guy Wilber
Reno, Nevada
Guy, all,

I have always read that long-haul trucking in the US was significantly curtailed during WWII due to lack of fuel, tires, and even new trucks.

From the ICC class I railways statistics:
United States
Revenue carloads originated: 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945

Horses, mules, ponies, asses 10,887 11,919 17,659 16,518 18,715
Cattle and calves, single-dck 305,555 378,473 408,155 465,520 529,828
Calves, double deck 6,830 6,174 7,473 7,190 6,289
Sheep and goats, single-deck 20,691 18,307 16,624 19,989 19,625
Sheep and goats, double-deck 80,052 92,096 94,971 91,471 95,604
Hogs, single-deck 68,701 64,428 74,227 73,935 74,230
Hogs, double-deck 117,538 142,304 188,037 193,660 136,907

I think this is meet in reefers?
Fresh Meats, N. O. S. 268,402 276,023 273,056 314,147 273,370

I do not have any post-war data.

Dave Evans


UP's Daylight Livestock Train...was Re: Post War Stock Cars

devansprr
 

-- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Brock" <brockm@...> wrote:

One of those profitable trains was the UP Daylight Livestock train running
between Salt Lake City and LA. The train was developed to be more
competitive with trucking and to avoid having to expand the stock yards at
Las Vegas, NV, which were used to water and feed stock enroute to LA. This
was necessary because of travel time laws. The Daylight train dropped the
travel time in about half and eliminated the stop in Vegas. The train was
initiated in 1947 and by 1949 UP handled more livestock than any other RR.
The year 1949 showed an increase of 9% just on this run. The late Terry
Metcalfe wrote a very thorough article on this train in the first issue of
The Streamliner by the UPHS in Jan 1985.

Mike Brock
Mike,

The stock cars for these trains had been upgraded to roller bearings. The book "Railway Mechanical Engineering, A Century of Progress, Car and Locomotive Design", published by American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) in 1979. States:

"The first large application of roller bearings was to 300 50-ton stock cars on the Union Pacific in 1947 (Fig. 9). These cars operated between Salt Lake City and Los Angeles with a 58-60 hour running time. After being rebuilt with roller bearings applied, the running time was reduced to less than 30 hours. This enabled shipments to market without and intermediate-stop to feed and water the cattle. This service was so effective that another 500 cars were ordered."

Figure 9 shows car 49018 class S-40-10 with a date of OM 3-47 noted on it. The book has old halftone grey scale images - not the best for reading any of the smaller markings.

What is curious is that the wheel bearing covers look like the older plain bearing caps - and they look to be painted a very light color - maybe even white - perhaps to indicate they should not be serviced like a plain bearing.

The caption for figure 9:

"Union Pacific Livestock car 49018 equipped with Timken bearings which fit into AAR standard side frames of the integral box type. Axles were machined from worn friction bearing axles. 800 existing livestock cars were placed in service on Timken by the U.P. during 1947 and 1948."

I wonder how long these cars retained the white bearing covers. For modeling, seems to me like a regular plain bearing truck could be used under these cars - just need to paint the bearing caps.

Dave Evans


Re: Train Miniature

Steven D Johnson
 

There is some good information here, at least on all the models in the Train Miniature line:



http://www.ho-scaletrains.net/trainminiature/index.html



Steve Johnson





From: STMFC@yahoogroups.com [mailto:STMFC@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Al and Patricia Westerfield
Sent: Sunday, May 05, 2013 5:06 PM
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [STMFC] Train Miniature






Does anyone know the history of Train Miniature? I’ve never heard a word about the line. Certainly the owner must have had a large supply of photos to do all the accurate lettering (on not so accurate cars). – Al Westerfield
.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Railway Express Agency Article

al_brown03
 

"Railway Express: An Overview"; Rocky Mountain Publishing: Denver, 1992.

Al Brown, Melbourne, Fla.

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, RUTLANDRS@... wrote:

Bill,
Vic also did a book about modeling the REA. I think by Carsten's and
pretty sure it was a conglomeration of the articles.
Chuck Hladik


In a message dated 5/5/2013 6:35:10 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
PARDIEW001@... writes:





I have just spent the morning (without any success) going through
my collection of Rail Model Journal magazines seeking an article by
Vic Roseman on REA delivery trucks. The article appeared somewhere
near the end of publication. Does anyone recall what issue this was in
or better yet what paint he recommended for these trucks?

One tends to forget how much great material was in this magazine.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








Re: Train Miniature

Tom Madden
 

Frank Pearsall wrote:

Was originally started by the guy who ran Balboa Scale Models (brass importers) (Ted "Something") in the early 1970s.
Ted Hollow

Tom Madden


C&O box car for sale

Clark Propst
 

I have a Des Plaines Hobbies C&O Viking roofed Red Caboose box car renumbered 5483. It has Keith Retterer three panel doors and Duco ends. Photo on request.
Clark Propst
Mason City Iowa


Re: Railway Express Agency Article

Benjamin Hom
 

Wow. Lots of misinformation flying around on this thread. Let's set
some things straight:

Chuck Hladik wrote:
"Vic also did a book about modeling the REA. I think by Carsten's and
pretty sure it was a conglomeration of the articles."

Vic Roseman authored "Railway Express - An Overview", but the rest of
Chuck's post is incorrect. The book was published in 1992 by Rocky
Mountain Publishing (the post-Schleicher publisher of Model
Railroading). While it includes material from his series in Model
Railroading, it expands on what was previously published and is NOT
strictly a conglomeration of articles.


Scott Haycock wrote:
"IIRC, he did at least 2 articles on REA trucks, but I think they
were in Model Railroading Mag, not RMJ. I found one, on cowl-length
trucks in the Dec 2003 issue."

Here's a link to that article:
http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/pages/166/12048/december-2003-page-42

Not entirely true. The article that Bill Pardie was looking for was
in the January 2008 issue of Railmodel Journal.
http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/pages/1/50/january-2008-page-50

Additionally, Vic did an additional article on REA trucks in the May
1991 issue of Model Railroading.
http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/pages/215/15828/may-1991-page-14


Ben Hom


Re: Railway Express Agency Article

Charles Hladik
 

Bill,
Vic also did a book about modeling the REA. I think by Carsten's and
pretty sure it was a conglomeration of the articles.
Chuck Hladik

In a message dated 5/5/2013 6:35:10 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
PARDIEW001@HAWAII.RR.COM writes:





I have just spent the morning (without any success) going through
my collection of Rail Model Journal magazines seeking an article by
Vic Roseman on REA delivery trucks. The article appeared somewhere
near the end of publication. Does anyone recall what issue this was in
or better yet what paint he recommended for these trucks?

One tends to forget how much great material was in this magazine.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


UP's Daylight Livestock Train...was Re: Post War Stock Cars

Mikebrock
 

Tim O'Connor writes:

"There were probably still some profitable stock operations in
1950 but I imagine most of them were very low margin, and the
industry was changing dramatically in the 1950's for other
reasons, so it's really no wonder that railroads didn't want
or were not able to adapt to a rapidly changing market."

One of those profitable trains was the UP Daylight Livestock train running
between Salt Lake City and LA. The train was developed to be more competitive with trucking and to avoid having to expand the stock yards at Las Vegas, NV, which were used to water and feed stock enroute to LA. This was necessary because of travel time laws. The Daylight train dropped the travel time in about half and eliminated the stop in Vegas. The train was initiated in 1947 and by 1949 UP handled more livestock than any other RR. The year 1949 showed an increase of 9% just on this run. The late Terry Metcalfe wrote a very thorough article on this train in the first issue of The Streamliner by the UPHS in Jan 1985.

Mike Brock


Re: Train Miniature

Frank Pearsall
 

Was originally started by the guy who ran Balboa Scale Models (brass importers) (Ted "Something") in the early 1970s. Then it went to Illinois and became "Train Miniature of Illinois Ltd." Dave Rouzer in South Holland, Ill. was the owner. Then Walthers purchased the line and incorporated it into their line.

Frank Pearsall
Brevard, N.C.

On May 5, 2013, at 6:05 PM, "Al and Patricia Westerfield" <westerfieldalfred@frontier.com> wrote:


Does anyone know the history of Train Miniature? I’ve never heard a word about the line. Certainly the owner must have had a large supply of photos to do all the accurate lettering (on not so accurate cars). – Al Westerfield


Re: Railway Express Agency Article

Benjamin Hom
 

Bill Pardie asked:
"I have just spent the morning (without any success) going through
my collection of Rail Model Journal magazines seeking an article by
Vic Roseman on REA delivery trucks. The article appeared somewhere
near the end of publication. Does anyone recall what issue this was in
or better yet what paint he recommended for these trucks?"

January 2008 issue, available (with all other Railmodel Journal and
Model Railroading issues) at TrainLife:
http://www.trainlife.com/magazines/pages/1/50/january-2008-page-50

It took me literally less time to log into the Kalmbach website, do a
search for "railway express" on the Model Train Magazine index (still
at http://index.mrmag.com), and pull the article to get the URL than it
did to type out this response. PLEASE use the research tools
available - otherwise, they WILL go away as the Index almost did.


Ben Hom


Re: Railway Express Agency Article

Scott H. Haycock
 

Bill,
IIRC, he did at least 2 articles on REA trucks, but I think they were in Model Railroading Mag, not RMJ. I found one, on cowl-length trucks in the Dec 2003 issue.


Scott Haycock
Modeling Tarheel country in the Land of Enchantm ent

----- Original Message -----






I have just spent the morning (without any success) going through
my collection of Rail Model Journal magazines seeking an article by
Vic Roseman on REA delivery trucks. The article appeared somewhere
near the end of publication. Does anyone recall what issue this was in
or better yet what paint he recommended for these trucks?

One tends to forget how much great material was in this magazine.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Railway Express Agency Article

eshoben <eshoben@...>
 

I believe the article you are looking for appeared in 12/03 in "Model Railroading". In it, the recommended shade of green is Tamiya Flat green. There is some discussion of color, but the flat green is the recommendation under typical layout lighting.

The issue of the magazine is available from Trainlife.

Hope this help. -ed Shoben

--- In STMFC@yahoogroups.com, WILLIAM PARDIE <PARDIEW001@...> wrote:


I have just spent the morning (without any success) going through
my collection of Rail Model Journal magazines seeking an article by
Vic Roseman on REA delivery trucks. The article appeared somewhere
near the end of publication. Does anyone recall what issue this was in
or better yet what paint he recommended for these trucks?

One tends to forget how much great material was in this magazine.

Thanks in advance for any help:

Bill Pardie

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Post War Stock Cars

Ray Breyer
 

In 1950, 66 railroads owned a total of 54,555 stock cars. The largest was
the Santa Fe with 13% of the national fleet. Only 3 roads east of the fleet
Mississippi: PRR, NYC, and B&O, had 1000 stock cars or more. 18 railroads
had 80% of the stock cars.
Steve Sandifer

Um, the IC had 1100 stock cars in 1950, the Rock had 1207, the Q had 3573, the C&NW had 3331, the Milwaukee had 3690.

Might want to rethink and say west of Ohio. The Mississippi has always been a bad way of deliniating "east" and "west", especially for us Midwesterners (of course, we generally consider Ohio to be part of the east......)

Regards,
Ray Breyer
Elgin, IL


Re: Train Miniature

Mark Drake <markstation01@...>
 

1970's shake-the-box type, Walthers ran the molds in the 1980's


Mark L. Drake
eBay ID member1108

From: Al and Patricia Westerfield <westerfieldalfred@frontier.com>
To: STMFC@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, May 5, 2013 6:05 PM
Subject: [STMFC] Train Miniature

 

Does anyone know the history of Train Miniature? I’ve never heard a word about the line. Certainly the owner must have had a large supply of photos to do all the accurate lettering (on not so accurate cars). – Al Westerfield
.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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